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Police chief's son, 18, charged with beating elderly Sikh man, smiles, flips bird in court: reports

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level 1
554 points · 1 month ago

"Words can barely describe how embarrassed, dejected, and hurt my wife, daughters, and I feel right now," the chief wrote on Facebook. He also wrote that his son, who has spent time in both juvenile and adult jail, needs to be held accountable for his actions.

good

level 2

Oh thank god. I really thought this story was going to end in him getting away Scot free because of who his dad is.

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level 1

I love how the picture they chose of the Sikh man is him smiling. One thing that is quite nice about stories like this, where someone is so blatantly being a dick, is that everyone can unite and say "hey fuck that guy"

level 2
1.0k points · 1 month ago

I don't love how the police chief is implicated in the title, even though it's an estranged son.

level 3
975 points · 1 month ago

"[The Police Chief] also wrote that his son, who has spent time in both juvenile and adult jail, needs to be held accountable for his actions."

level 4

Bummer for the dad. It’s a lot like Fauda.

level 5

Like fauda like son

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level 3

That's how they sensationalize the title to get you to read the article. Pretty normal nowadays. Journalism is horrible lately and little seem to care.

level 4

This is what happens when you trade clicks for subscriptions. You want this shit to go away, pay for your local paper and a national paper like yer Dad.

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level 1
7.1k points · 1 month ago

I remember my friend's dad was a police officer and he always stressed to her how important her continued good behavior was because it reflected poorly on him as an officer and he could even lose his job if she were to do something horrible.

That last part was after she got a ticket for having cigarettes under age 18 and he was upset about it. I remember him being legitimately worried for his job because of how it might reflect on him.

level 2
Comment deleted1 month ago(136 children)
level 3
776 points · 1 month ago

That's why you have to teach your kids how to make decisions, rather than deciding for them.

level 4

Teach them how to think, not what to think.

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level 4

As a parent, I’m really keying in to how parents are instructing their children. There’s a staggering number that demand the correct behavior - “Say you’re sorry!” Rather than explaining anything - “you hurt them. What should you do?”

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level 2
219 points · 1 month ago

My father is a police officer. Growing up, he always warned me that if I did something stupid and got in trouble, it could cost him his job. Luckily I never got caught doing stupid shit.

level 3

My dad is a financial advisor. He warned me to be careful with my money and how I invest, as it could reflect poorly on him. I am subscribed to r/wallstreetbets. He is disappointed in me.

level 4

I feel for you, I have a similar story.

My father is a kangaroo. He warned me to be careful with where and how I hop, as it could reflect poorly on him. I am now subscribed to /r/hopscotch. He is disappointed in me.

level 5

In half a decade, no one's been interested in hopscotch enough to post or comment there. Amazing.

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level 2
38 points · 1 month ago

I know of agencies locally that forbid employees (sworn LEO and civilians) from living with convicted felons. Including family members.

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level 2
1.1k points · 1 month ago

I feel for this dad, office aside.

My step bro is like this kid, just a POS human being. A big reason I have no interest in having kids of my own, could end up with a real dud and that risk is not worth the heartache or the headaches.

level 3
Comment deleted1 month ago(20 children)
level 4
89 points · 1 month ago

I have so many step-siblings from suffering through 9 marriages from both parents

sounds like shit parents raised shit kids and found other shit parents who raised shit kids.

i dont mean that as offensive, but it probably is.

sorry

level 5
Comment deleted1 month ago(0 children)

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level 4

Don't give up on yourself too easily. You'd be so amazed by the people I've met who were raised by losers, fucked up majorly as young people and even as adults, and somehow turned it around and become important, intelligent, valuable members of the community. In fact, you have the potential to be even more important to people because of your background. You have been through some shit, and survived, and somehow have developed some kind of insight into not only your behavior but a moral code. That's more than a lot of people ever do.

level 4

You are far ahead of others who are not self reflective and have no idea or don’t care how their actions affect others.

You at least have the opportunity to do better, and to consistently work in following the Golden Rule.

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level 3
682 points · 1 month ago

Kids don't automatically become a dud. A lot of things influence their behavior and how they grow up, the major thing is the parents of course.

In this case, the kid was estranged with his parents and such. So he was left with his own devices, let the wrong crowd influence him more when it should be his parents instead.

level 4
[deleted]
530 points · 1 month ago

You’re right, but it’s still a possibility. You could do everything right and still have a shitty kid. If you’re a good parent the odds are low but for someone on the fence about having kids it’s a pretty scary prospect.

level 5

Very real possibility. It’s what scares me about having kids. Doing everything right and still... they end up a shithead.

level 6
263 points · 1 month ago

Also, it's impossible to "do everything right" as a parent. Every parent with every child is winging it, because children are different and there is no handy-dandy notebook for how to raise them right.

level 7

This, there's no perfect way to raise a kid. Otherwise, we wouldn't have such problems today.

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level 7
33 points · 1 month ago

My mom likes to use the "there was not handbook for this, we just did the best we can," but there are thousands of books on parenting and child psychology and I'm pretty sure all of them say that silently watching your husband chase your (not his) kid around the house with a belt will not foster healthy relationships or coping mechanisms.

(*I know that's not what you were talking about, you just triggered my need to vent a little bit. Thanks for letting me use your post to do so.)

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level 6
126 points · 1 month ago

I got your back on this one. I wont have kids for the same reason. And I am that reason. I am that disaster of a human that came from amazing parents. And i know a few other people alot like me. I really feel for the/my parents. So much dissapointment and heartache. You can be amazing parents and still wind up with a lemon.

level 7
91 points · 1 month ago

Don't beat yourself dude, at least you acknowledge your prior mistakes. You can still grow from them and be a better person. It's never too late man, the world needs more understanding and kind people.

level 8

Thanks for the positive comments. I wasnt really trying to shit on myself. I think i overly condensed a complicated topic.

level 9

For what it’s worth, it’s never too late to start making good choices and mend fences.

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level 7

Hey dude lemons are great, don't involve lemons in this. They deserve more respect.

level 8

Sorry bro.

level 9

He just really likes lemons.

level 9

Thank you, I appreciate your apology and accept it wholeheartedly. Lemons are great

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level 4

Partially.

I want to preface that my two young daughter are not shit-heads, but kind, caring children with a lot of love and compassion, but they also have 2 very opposite ways of dealing with emotions and events, even though they both have been raised by myself and their mother the whole time.

Genetics play a huge part and sometimes no matter how a person is raised, their actions falls solely on who they are.

level 5
125 points · 1 month ago

Dad of three here, uncle of two more. From what I've seen and experienced, kids come out with a good portion of their personality pre-loaded.

level 6
58 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

I worked with kids for a special school for violennt behavior.

When I first started I assumed it was nuture. I learned quickly from others and my own experience, that nature had a large say in it as well.

I was assigned to one kid.

His siblings and family were sweet, but he wouldn’t think twice about throwing a desk at someone who irritated him slightly. Like a teacher asking him to hang up his jacket.

I remember I would talk to his parents at time, because I was so good with him. You could tell his mother was guilt ridden, because she always assumed it was something she did. I think she asked me questions over and over, just to see what I was doing right with him.

Last time I heard he was sent away, because he tried to kill his little sister and threatened to kill his mom while she was sleeping.

Edit: Sorry, mobile is a pain sometimes with battling spell check.

level 7
41 points · 1 month ago

Wait, do you mean you thought it was nurture but then realized it was also nature? You wrote nature twice and I just want to be sure, as this is a fascinating anecdote.

level 8

Sorry, my fault - mobile spell check is ferocious. It kept changing it to nature instead of nurture. Then it kept going to butter for some reason after it figured I didn’t want nature. I battle both words for over 50 seconds, and thought I had it.

I meant I thought it was nurture growing up. Then I realized while working with these really messed up kids who really had good parents and support systems it was also nature.

Thanks for saying something. I would have never noticed it!

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level 5

I believe people don’t like to think of the impact of genetics. It’s an unpopular idea. People like to think they’re in control. “It’s not going to be my kids because I’m gonna do things right.” It’s a scary thought that you could do everything right and your child still not flourish. And it doesn’t feel as good when your kid does well and it’s not due to your own diligence but just genetic roulette.

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level 5

I wonder if this is being forgotten because people have so few siblings these days. I grew up in the countryside where it was the norm to have 5 or 6 kids, and it was just common knowledge that otherwise charitable, lovely, stable, extremely kind families sometimes produce a sociopathic deadbeat - they're called black sheep.

The opposite was true, too. Fantastically incompetent parents sometimes pop out valedictorians.

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level 4
52 points · 1 month ago

My brother and I were raised by the same parents at the same time. I’ve been at the same job for 4 years working 50-60 hours a week. All my bills are paid on time. Never been arrested in my life. I have a tendency to put others needs ahead of my own.

My brother is a homeless junky in and out of halfway houses because he hasn’t had a job in years. It’s naturally everyone else’s fault. He once stole $5,000 from my dad and left him stranded in an other state.

Sometimes people turn out to be pieces of shit in spite of their parents, not because of them.

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level 2
18 points · 1 month ago

Sometimes it's the "Preachers Kid" syndrome. It's not him, sometimes the pressure of him being the parent makes some kids revolt.

level 2
74 points · 1 month ago

When I was in college, one of the biggest degenerates I knew was the son of the chief of detectives of a decent sized city. Enormous coke head. He got away with it because his dad always got him out.

It goes both ways.

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level 1

He is 18. If I were his father, I would lazily prop my feet up and let whatever happens happen. Not because I didn't love him, but because it is time for him to face consequences for being a complete shit head.

level 2

Sounds like the dad did even more than just let things happen:

The police chief and his wife worked with local police to track down their son and the 16-year-old.

It's good to read that he's not trying to get his son out of this.

level 3
3.1k points · 1 month ago

His father made an actually really heartbreaking statement about his son.

He basically stated him and his wife raised three children the same way and 2 out of three are doing great. They cannot figure out what happened with this child and it breaks their hearts he hurt someone

level 4
1.9k points · 1 month ago

It's not that unusual honestly. Sometimes you do everything right and your kid still ends up fucked up for some reason or another.

level 5
1.6k points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

Friends. We underestimate how much an impact friends make on development. I think they matter much more than parents after 12 or so.

level 6

Iirc friends have been proven to have a bigger impact on children's behavior than their parents.

level 7
638 points · 1 month ago

Iirc Friends was a popular show in the 90's.

level 8

I was lucky and dodged that bullet, my life could have taken a dark turn if I had watched that show.

level 9

So no one told you life was gonna be this way

level 10

clap clap clap clap

level 10

Your life's a joke, youre broke, your love life's DOA!

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level 9
21 points · 1 month ago

my life could have taken a dark turn if I had watched that show.

Can confirm. I grew up watching Friends, and now, whenever I see an attactive woman, I instinctively nod and say "How you doin'?"

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level 7

It depends on the environment as a whole. Friends, family, school, world events, music, food, the literal health of the environment. All of these play a factor in determining someone’s future.

Parents play the most important role of a young child’s life. Despite a harsh environment, a well equipped parent can alleviate any damage that’s being done. But once a child starts to go through puberty, the environment they’re in plays a bigger role. This is when we start to develop lasting personalities, friendships that have significance, relationships that comfort you in a way you haven’t felt before. This is when we start to really learn about the world. This is when parents can only do so much, especially when other parents aren’t as well equipped in either knowledge or physical resources.

Life is tough and this is one of those moments that puts a perfect life into perspective; that nothing is ever perfect, and nothing ever lasts. We can’t control everything. We can only do our best.

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level 6
40 points · 1 month ago

IIRC I read somewhere that after around 4-5 friends become your biggest influencers

level 7

But at 4-5 your parents still have an impact on who you’re friends with (scheduled playdates, anyone?)

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level 5

That's why I ended up alright.

No friends.

level 6

Makes me wonder who I was influenced by or I just somehow shaped who I am myself.

level 7
Comment deleted1 month ago(1 child)
level 8
11 points · 1 month ago

I had two six-year-long friendships that didnt have any overlap with a small gab between them. Three if you count my now wife.

I gravitated to nerds (someone who didnt laugh at me for wanting to play video games), and I think it's why I'm not a carbon copy if the semi-alcoholic dumb fuck that my rural town pumps out like it's running out of style.

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level 5

Yeah, there’s a ton of influences on a kids life that are outside of a parent’s control. You can’t see everything they see or hear everything they hear.

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level 4

There's always a black sheep in the family. My parents married young and somehow made it work and managed to raise 6 kids. My mom's younger brother, who was also my dad's best friend, became a drug addict and transient. Growing up, I always saw him as just a leech on our family, and never understood how my dad put up with my mom's loser brother. It was a shock to find out they were friends.

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level 3
4.8k points · 1 month ago

It's been mentioned elsewhere that they're estranged. The son is a wannabe thug. Really sympathize with the parents because I doubt they raised him to be such a fuck-up, not to mention the media are constantly going to headline that they're related even if the father had zero impact in this.

level 4
1.7k points · 1 month ago

He's gone considerably past wannabe

level 5

I don’t think beating up an elderly man gets you your certified thug card. Pretty sure it just makes you a piece of shit human.

level 6

You always read about kids joining gangs and then choosing some defenseless person to assault as a part of their initiation. You ever wonder why they pick people like that, or what beating up someone who can't fight back proves? It's not about how tough you are. It's about following orders unquestioningly. They tell you to go beat up the most sympathetic victims because it proves that you will do the worst things imaginable without flinching. They want people who follow orders more than they want the strongest thugs.

level 7

I work security and had a man come up to myself and some coworkers. He was jumped by 3 people in the train station, who the cops identified as gang members or associates. They beat the crap out of this guy, who was on his way to work. It took everything in me not to break down. when I had to call his wife (he was so disoriented he could not give her directions to pick him up), she was basically sobbing, and the look on her face when she saw him... man, I'll never forget that. They basically ruined this guy's life for the month, and by extension his family's, because he was too hurt to go to work. This man had two jobs just so he could support his wife and kid, and some shit-head gang members decided that he was a good target for initiation. I usually stay composed about incidents, but even thinking about it makes me upset.

level 8
[deleted]
201 points · 1 month ago

Honestly, this is why I find it hard to forgive anyone who is a former gang member. Yeah you got out but you probably killed or seriously hurt someone to get in, in the first place. You not being in jail for that or owning up to that means you aren't truly remorseful for your gang life. It means gang life got too much for you and you bailed on it and now trying to cash in on your association.

level 9

I feel like there needs to be less of a focus on forgiveness and a focus on stopping it from happening in the first place. I know there is a whole host of problems associated with that idea, and I am doubtful there will ever be a perfect solution. I guess my main point is how do people expect to be forgiven when they've done something shitty?

level 10
[deleted]
233 points · 1 month ago

There was a guy who called himself a pastor down in Central America country I lived in as well for two years. He came to visit my church here in the states. He said he was a former 18th street gang member, a gang I knew well from where I lived at. Everyone was fawning over this guy for changing his life around and becoming a good guy.

He introduced himself to me. I was not nice to him. He was a gang banger during the time his gang killed a city bus full of innocent people with machine-guns and grenades. I asked him about it and whether he was a part of that. He denounced it. I asked him if he was going to rat the guys out who did it then because "you obviously know who did it being a part of that gang". He couldn't answer me. I told him "Until you do, don't pretend to be a pastor." Those guys on that bus killed an infant and her mother.

Fuck gang members.

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level 7

Well, and they want to cross a threshold with those initiates. Once you do something horrendous like what the guy in the op did, you've crossed a specific line. And if your actions are validated and supported by people you want validation and support from, then that part of you that says "hey, beating up and/or killing vulnerable people is a terrible thing to do" dies a little bit, or even completely. By being numbed to the atrocities of their actions, they are less likely to stick to any reasonable moral compass, making them more willing underlings.

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level 6

What constitutes as thug behavior these days? I never considered thugs to be above doing things like this. In my mind thug = piece of shit human, although I'm sure that doesn't exactly apply to all of them and there are a few good ones caught up in a bad situations

level 7

Fun thug fact: the word originated in India!

1810, "member of a gang of murderers and robbers in India who strangled their victims," from Marathi thag, thak "cheat, swindler," Hindi thag, perhaps from Sanskrit sthaga-s "cunning, fraudulent," from sthagayati "(he) covers, conceals," from PIE root *(s)teg- "to cover."

Originally members of the Thuggee (Tuggee) were members of the Thuggee Cult, a secretive one which worshipped Kali. They would embed themselves with travelers then rob and strangle them in their sleeps.

level 8

That's....more of an answer than I ever expected. Thanks, TIL!

level 8

It is like none watches Indiana Jones anymore, geez. Kali Maaaaa

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level 7
14 points · 1 month ago

Semantics. Thug or not: he is 18 and will likely become a main jail inmate.

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level 6
255 points · 1 month ago

hes gone full mark wahlberg

level 7

That would be a hilarious defense statement.

level 8
73 points · 1 month ago

"Your honor, my client simply felt the vibration."

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level 7

Mark Wahlberg grew up in poverty with divorced parents, the youngest of nine kids, at least four of which served time. He was also a gang member and coke addict by 13. He went to jail a couple of times and then completely turned his life around. I'm not really sure why he doesn't get any credit for that. Isn't that what we want for people in the justice system?

level 8

Holy moly he was a drug addict by 13?

level 9

Sadly happens a lot more than you'd think. Addicrion starts really young in some families.

level 10

Addicrion

Sounds like the villain from a 90's cartoon anti-drug PSA

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level 9
31 points · 1 month ago

Yep, addicted to cocaine, possibly other drugs too

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level 8
Comment deleted1 month ago(More than 7 children)
level 9

Jeez, no kidding. Dude rolled a nat 20 on a life do over.

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level 9

Still can't tell the difference between him and Matt Damon half the time

level 10

You know Mark Wahlberg. The guy in Good Will Hunting.

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level 6
9 points · 1 month ago

Well the definition of a thug is: a violent person, especially a criminal. Seems pretty accurate to me? Do you have some romanticized version?

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level 4
222 points · 1 month ago

Sad part is he could have his entire life set for success if he wasnt a piece of shit. Dads chief of police? Ok stay fit, stay out of trouble, go to the academy to be an officer, get hired, retire with a great pension and benefits in 25 years. Dude could be 50 and retired and never have to worry about money in his entire life.

What a waste.

level 5
88 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

It's nuts my father graduated with two people who became police offers and they retired now in their early fifties. Wtf am I doing with my office job...

Edit. Forgot to mention I am Canadian where being a police officer is much safer than American officers.

level 6
142 points · 1 month ago

Wtf am I doing with my office job...

Making your boss's boss a disgustingly disproportionate amount of money

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level 3
384 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

Yes, the police chief/father has publicly admonished his estranged son's reprehensible actions.[1]

I am completely disgusted in sharing with you that, later yesterday evening, I received a call from the Manteca PD that the suspect in this horrific crime turns out to by my 18-year old son. He has been estranged from our family and our home for several months now.

Words can barely describe how embarrassed, dejected, and hurt my wife, daughters, and I feel right now. Violence and hatred is not what we have taught our children; intolerance for others is not even in our vocabulary, let alone our values. Crime has never been an element of our household, our values, nor the character to which we hold ourselves.

Despite having the desire any parent would have in wanting to protect their child, my oath is (and always will be) to the law and my vow of integrity guides me through this horrendous difficulty. My stomach has been churning from the moment I learned this news. Even though my status as a law enforcement leader has no bearing or relation to the case whatsoever, I am nonetheless devastated by how much the nature of my son’s actions are such a departure from everything I have stood for in my personal life, and in my 37-year policing career.

My son began to lose his way a couple years ago, while he was a juvenile, running away and getting involved in a bad crowd. He pretty much divorced his friends and family, associating with people none of us knew. He got into trouble for some theft-related crimes and ended up spending several months in juvenile hall. As an adult, he was again arrested for a theft-related incident, and he ended up spending another three months in adult jail as a result. Since being released he has been wayward and has not returned to our family home for several months.

About 10am this morning, Manteca police tracked, found, and arrested my son in Modesto. My wife and I worked with Manteca PD to help them track him down and arrest him.


  1. San Francisco Chronicle - Union City police chief’s son arrested for attack on 71-year-old Sikh man

level 4

I really feel for that man and his wife.

Makes me wish I was his kid just so I could try to turn my life around.

level 4
198 points · 1 month ago

The convicted rapist Brock Turner's father could learn a thing or two from this gentleman.

level 5

You mean Stanford's Brock Turner? The rapist Brock Turner who raped someone and then got convicted of raping someone? That Brock Turner?

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level 5

How dare you?! That man's son doesn't even like steak anymore.

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level 4

Sounds like a really respectable guy. I'm glad that he doesn't defend the actions of his child in any way, but I still couldn't imagine being in his situation, sounds terrible.

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level 3
60 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

I almost wish he wasn't mentioned in the headline like this. It makes it seem he is some way complicit.

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level 3
75 points · 1 month ago

My dad was chief of police. He basically offered a reward of his guys caught us doing stuff and threatened them if they would try to let us go to gain his favor.

level 4

Did anything ever come of it? Did you ever get pulled over or anything?

level 5
37 points · 1 month ago

I’d don’t but my sister got arrested for throwing water balloons at cars the night she graduated from high school. I did minor stuff, like skateboarding where I wasn’t supposed to, but never got caught

level 6

how many years of prison did she get?

level 7
45 points · 1 month ago

Still locked up at Guantanamo.

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level 3
Comment deleted1 month ago(57 children)
level 4

Regardless if hes a sihk, hes 71 yrs old.

I don't think being a Sikh is any reason to be beaten...

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level 4

He needs to get charged with a hate, this meets the definition quite obviously. If he doesn't, we'll know exactly the type of person the county's DA is.

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level 2

Seriously - if he is behaving like this at 18 imagine how its going to escalate as he gets older.

level 3

On the other hand, it's the American prison system. Imagine how it's going to escalate once he spends a few years in prison with other violent criminals and then gets out with 0 job prospects. Not saying there's a better solution available at this time, but I doubt prison is going to do anything good for this guy.

level 4
Comment deleted1 month ago(69 children)
level 5

Hunger Games

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level 3

To be fair I was horrible as an 18 year old and I've become a MUCH better person since then.

That being said I had shitty abusive parents, and I started getting better once I cut them out of my life, this kids dad seems top notch.

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level 2

Because you DO love him you'd do it.

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level 1

There's a special place in hell for people who attack the elderly. Fuck this dumb ass teenager. I hope he gets the maximum punishment

level 2

Dudes got a record, he probably will get that or close.

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level 2
132 points · 1 month ago

I thought it was cowardly enough that he attacked an elderly person, but the fact that he came back to get a few more kicks in while the guy was on the ground is the lowest of the low.

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level 1

Nothing says "winner" like an 18 year old brat beating up an old man.

level 1

He looks so happy to be in court

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Comment deleted1 month ago(10 children)
level 3

I think he's trying to hide his embarrassment with a smile. I do it a lot.

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level 1
583 points · 1 month ago

His smug attitude makes me think he forgot he’s 18 now and will be charged as an adult.

No more juvie for you dickhead. It’s time for some real jail time.

level 2

I think he could be tried as an adult before 18. Also, if I read it right he has already spent time in an adult jail as well as a juvenile facility. Doesn’t seem like he has learned nor does he care. Unfortunately there’s no rehabilitation in jail/prison and he will likely come out worse off than when he went in.

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level 2

Yeah, that's cause jail in the states isn't about rehabilitation, he'll spend 5 to 10 inside, be let out after 3 for good behavior and in those 3 years he'll be surrounded by the same gang he was hanging out with outside.

The only thing prison will do for this kid is make him a hardened criminal who will go in and out of the system until he does something that keeps him in.

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level 1
2.2k points · 1 month ago

I took care of a veteran who was age 16 when he fought in WWII. I asked him how he ended up in the Pacific Theater at age 16, this is what he said: "My dad was a police chief in Brooklyn. I was a bad kid. I was robbing bodegas in the neighborhood at the time. When he found out, he sent me to join the Navy. He sure straightened me out." Things were different back then.

level 2
755 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

That shit still happens, what are you talking about? I know people in their 20s and 30s who were shit people before enlisting. My cousin was a 17 year old kid in a court room and the judge gave him the option of jail time or enlisting. He served 15 years in the Navy.

level 3
444 points · 1 month ago

Because no branch accepts people who enlist because of a court oder/plea deal anymore

level 4

Ya during the height of Iraq it was a thing but in recent years nah

level 5

Not true. In the early 2000s even so much as a single felony charge which had been dismissed was grounds for rejection.

Source: Rejected from enlisting in any branch of the military.

level 6

It was true, during the surge there were a lot of waivers given out. They were waiving felonies before that and increased the number.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2007/02/14/us/14military.html

level 6

If you tried in 2007 you probably would have been accepted

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level 5

it really makes me feel old when a decade ago is considering classic history. I just heard Falloutboy on the oldies station here too. it's not been a good day for me today

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level 4

Fair enough. For every person they straightened out there would probably be a bunch that were either dead weight or even a danger to their own unit

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Comment deleted1 month ago(8 children)

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level 3
52 points · 1 month ago

My gf her dad was given 30 days to volunteer for the army or get convicted and sentenced

He got 2 year s in Vietnam instead

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level 3

Lmfao

Some game of thrones Nightswatch type shit

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level 1

I went to school with this guy. Didnt talk to him but I heard he was always doing some stupid shit

level 2

Thank yourself lucky you didn’t have to interact with this piece of subhuman shit

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level 1
347 points · 1 month ago

I'm an ex police officer, I once stopped an absolute pos whilst on duty. This kid proudly told me his dad was a sergeant in the next station over, out of professional courtesy I called the dad.

He sighed, stifled a sob, and simply said "lock him up".

I'd planned on doing that either way, but hearing a father just give up on the other end of the phone was heartbreaking

level 2

What’d he do?

level 3

I second this, what did he do?

level 4
12 points · 1 month ago

It’s been two hours. That kid probably did something to him for narcing on Reddit.

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level 3

Iirc drunk and disorderly was the original stop, later emerged it was possession intent to supply

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level 1
523 points · 1 month ago

Talk about daddy issues. If this pos wanted to rebel there are plenty of other ways that would've grabbed his dad's attention.

And what is it with Sikhs and California. They seem to be a favored target of some nasty poop.

level 2
402 points · 1 month ago

It's the turban. It makes the men easily identifiable, but muslim men don't wear such a thing and idiots don't care to learn anything about other cultures.

level 3
23 points · 1 month ago

After 9/11 some asshats I knew from school went to the local corner store and beat the shit out of the Sikh owner. Dumb fucks had no clue and ended up getting locked up for that shit.

level 3
84 points · 1 month ago

Some Muslims do. It depends on where in the world they came from.

level 4

Pretty sure majority of Muslims don't wear turban. It's only common in areas with hot, arid climate.

level 5

A particular sect of Muslims will wear turbans or a very similar style that could be mistaken for a turban. The clothing attire is mostly identical though as it reflects culture rather than religion. The usually white or cream matching long top and trousers.

level 6

Yeah headwear for Arab men is much more dependent on where they’re from that if they’re Muslim or not, people from places that are very hot and open (a lot of the Arabian Peninsula) usually wear them as it protects against the sun and sand being blown with the wind

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level 2
275 points · 1 month ago

Manny ignorant dumbasses can't figure it the difference between a Sikhs and Arab (Muslims). So, they attack them believing they are attacking a Taliban (or, other Muslim extremist). Ignorance seems to be the main product of our society.

level 3

Funny how Taliban are not even Arab but mostly Pashtun.

level 4

The kinds of people who can distinguish an Arab from a Pashtun probably aren't the kind of people attacking elderly folk

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level 3
200 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

It's really silly, because if you really don't like Muslims, Sikhs should be your natural ally

level 4
227 points · 1 month ago

because if you really don't like Muslims, Sikhs should be your natural ally

Not really. Historical animosities notwithstanding, the sikh community today doesn't bear any ill will towards Muslims. The problems were 200 to 400 hundred years ago. We're kind of over it.

source: Am sikh

level 5

I am very good friends with a Sikh and he very clearly has racial issues against Pakistani people.

level 6

That’s most likely an India/Pakistan issue and maybe not so much a Sikh/Muslim issue. Sikhs are traditionally the warriors and protectors of our homeland. Very patriotic. It’s literally why they exist as a group.

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level 6

A lot of Indians have problems w/ pakistanis. Something something India’s independence

level 6
60 points · 1 month ago

Not all Muslims are Pakistani though.

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[deleted]
129 points · 1 month ago

And what is it with Sikhs and California. They seem to be a favored target of some nasty poop.

It's Sikhs everywhere. Day after 9/11, some racist asshat in Mesa AZ shot and killed a Sikh in a very misguided revenge killing...

level 3
38 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

Grew up in a suburb of Sacramento. Before 9/11, I used to see a Sikh man taking a walk in my neighborhood every morning on my route to school. After 9/11, stopped seeing him altogether.

level 4

At least they still walk in the mornings at a park near me in Modesto. Sucks to imagine that they're putting themselves at risk for hate crimes...

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level 3

A Sikh man was harassed last week.

https://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2018/08/06/sikh-man-attacked-told-to-go-back-to-your-country-in-stanislaus-county/

When researching that I came across several incidents in California going back several years.

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/10/15/us/hate-crime-charges-in-attack-on-sikh-man-in-california.html

It probably happens all over but of late California seems to be in 'the' spotlight.

level 4

California is also the state with the highest population, which comes along with some areas being diverse and densely packed. I think that’s definitely a factor.

level 5

Also, California has the highest Sikh population in the US. New York is increasing quickly though, expect hate crimes to increase there as a result

level 6
25 points · 1 month ago

From what I have seen most Sikhs in California live well inland in agricultural areas and that part of California is culturally closer to Oklahoma than the liberal coastal cities.

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level 4
[deleted]
47 points · 1 month ago

Gah. People suck so hard.

It always makes me sad when some ignorant fuckhead takes out their impotent rage on a Sikh. Sikhs are some of the chillest people I've ever met...

OK, it makes me sad whenever an ignorant fuckhead takes out their impotent rage on anyone. it's super sad when they're so ignorant that they don't care that there are different kinds of people so any one is as good as any other.

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level 3
27 points · 1 month ago

Well, one, people assume they are muslims. Second, Sikhs in california are often in more rural/red parts of the state since a lot of farmer Sikhs moved to california (since they were farmers back home), ie yuba city. That compares to other groups of Indians who came for tech and are concentrated in major cities, and are less likely to be thought of as muslims since they are darker and lack the turban.

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level 1
920 points · 1 month ago

I hope his dad is spanking him in a jail cell right now.

level 2
Original Poster407 points · 1 month ago

Lol I don't know why I find this comment to be so funny.

level 3
212 points · 1 month ago

It's because I still got it, folks.

Your username is pretty funny, too.

level 4

Ain't no party like a juche party because a juche party will murder your entire family for speaking out against the party.

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level 1

r/iamatotalpieceofshit

This definitely belongs on this sub

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level 1

Put him away. Hate crime and contempt of court.

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level 1

If Sikhs are going to be attacked, we should let them wear their swords.

level 2
25 points · 1 month ago

Some still do, I can’t wait for someone to find that out the hard way

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level 1
197 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

This just goes to prove that all race, religion, environment, upbringing, or any other outside influences aside, some people are just pieces of shit.

level 2
163 points · 1 month ago

And his dad actually sounds like a decent guy. I feel sorry for this kid's family.

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level 1
113 points · 1 month ago

There's more than enough police corruption to go around but props to the dad for disavowing everything about his asshole kid instead of trying to make excuses. I do believe children are a reflection of their parents, but there are definitely cases where kids grow into terrible human beings regardless of how well you parent. I hope the man who was attacked is doing ok.

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level 1

Man fuck Stockton. My grandparents live there and have to put up with so much shit like this.

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level 1
17 points · 1 month ago

That guy looks pretty happy considering his circumstance

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level 1

Oh someone has a problem with authority. Better get all that cockiness out now, they are going to love a Sheriff's son in prison.

level 1

It pains me to know that peaceful people like the Sikh are often target of hatred and prejudice.

I hope this young man pays for his crimes

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level 1

I think this punk is doing the shit he's doing for the express purpose of hurting his dad.

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level 1

Aww, Sikhs are the nicest fucking people, what a piece of shit. I would have starved to death in 07 if it wasn't for the Sikh temple up the road from my house. They never even looked at me sideways once, Sikhs are always welcome at my table. What a fucking frozen dog shit dildo.

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level 1
641 points · 1 month ago

Why is this not blowing up on Twitter and other media sites as being a hate crime or getting tens of thousands of retweets?

level 2
345 points · 1 month ago

Why do you think? You already know this would have 8k comments.

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level 1
44 points · 1 month ago

That article's comments section is astounding. Even YouTube comments aren't that bad.

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level 1

lol what a fucking loser he’s a wannabe thug

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level 1

Out of all the religions and persuasions one could have a problem with, it would seem to me that Sikhs would come absolute last on that list.

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level 1

What kind of asshole beats up a Sikh?

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