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How does this sub feel about brothless ramen (mazemen)? This is one of my favorite meals to make for myself.

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I respect people that like it, but it definitely isn't my preference. Need that sweet broth to go with the noods.

Please send noods.

Original Poster43 points · 20 days ago

I totally respect your opinion, thanks for respecting my tastes! Aren't noodles the best?

RAMEN!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Original Poster80 points · 20 days ago

Ramen is made of 4 main ingredients: broth, noodles, flavorful oil, and toppings. Mazemen is all of the above, but without the broth. A mandatory topping is a poached or fried egg, so the runny yolk for a part of the sauce. I love Carbonara, and this is basically the ramen version of carbonara. It's delicious.

The bowl shown in the picture is tonight's dinner, made as follows:

Flavorful Oil: 3 parts sesame oil, 2 parts acid of choice, 1 part soy sauce, ground ginger to taste

Noodles: storebought fresh ramen noodles

Toppings:

  • Leftover sliced pork

  • Spinach sauteed with sliced garlic and ginger

  • Homemade pickled onions

  • Smoked Bonito flakes

  • Poached egg, with paprika

This both looks and sounds so delicious.

I love it, looks positively delicious.

-8 points · 20 days ago(3 children)
10 points · 20 days ago · edited 20 days ago

The sauces and oils provide flavour.

Sounds like you need some mazemen in your life.

Perhaps

I like it. Very open format for ramen. Made for quick eating if you don't have time to slurp hot broth. I still need to convince my friends about it. So far I have swayed them to liking tori paitan vs tonkotsu. People tend to like creamy ramen broths, which is ok, but I prefer chintan myself.

Looks great btw.

Hey I’m just just oof

10 points · 20 days ago

Mazemen and Abura Soba are two of my current obsessions. I love broth, don't get me wrong, but there's a lot of fun you can have without including a broth.

Cold, hot, spicy, mellow, super oily, super light...you can take as little or as much inspiration from other cultures as you like. Someone below mentioned pad thai, and I guarantee it's better with alkaline noodles than with rice noodles.

A japanified tomato sauce (heavy seafood presence, plenty of inosinate to amp up the umami), roasted notes, fresh scallions, roasted garlic/niboshi olive oil, couple anchovy filets, red wine ajitama...shit is LIT. And not for everyone.

A big part of it is working with ramen, and not liking to eat a ton at once while at work (makes me lazy, and I enjoy work less when I just want to nap). So my usual staff meal is a bowl of ramen minus any toppings other than scallions, or a jacked up aburasoba/mazemen made with whatever cool we have on hand. Started doing it at home, and now I have an excellent way to deal with leftovers and I get to have ramen-centric fun when inspiration strikes.

Sounds absolutely brilliant. Saving that shit.

I know it's not exactly the same, but Mie Goreng (Indo Mie instant) blew me away. I would love to find a place in AZ that serves mazemen.

What if they gave you the broth as a beverage? That would be good.

2 points · 20 days ago

I do something like this at home - separate the broth and the noodles when they're done cooking, then make egg drop soup with the broth and serve them side-by-side. It's pretty good.

I've never done the noodles with a fried egg on top, so I'll have to try that, but if I'm feeling especially gluttonous I make a mayo-based dipping sauce for the noodles.

I love mazemen. Some of my favorite regional ramen styles are really mazemen styles (like Taiwan mazesoba in Nagoya). A lot of Americans don’t get it since they don’t understand how it’s any different from pasta. A lot of shops I see in the US actually play up the association with Italian pasta and add meatballs or something. It’s a bit of a bummer, there’s so many great styles to explore that are still distinctly Japanese.

Is it pure evil that I hate egg in ramen? I can't eat egg, the taste of it just instantly triggers my gag/vomit reflex.

I was like this for most of my life. Only recently have I totally changed my stance on eggs, and it was because I began eating egg with my ramen. Now I'm obsessed with egg, especially a really good marinated egg.

I think tastes can change over time with exposure. Its good to try things now and again, just to see if you've developed a new appreciation for a given flavor. And if not, no worries either! Food is about nourishment and enjoyment. If you're not enjoying it, don't eat it!

Some people don’t like eggs, some people don’t like broccoli, and some people don’t like pizza.

You don’t have to apologize for a preference. Unless you don’t like pizza. Then you’re a monster and you should beg forgiveness for existing.

Personally, I love eggs. I think a perfectly poached egg in brothless noodles will make a lovely saucy texture.

I am the same. I'm intolerant to egg but I do love all egg except boiled, poached or any where it is raw or cooked without mixing. I just toss it over to my friends or family if I can't communicate that I don't want it. I always find a boiled egg rather out of place in ramen. It is nice when they make stir fried noodles with beaten egg mixed in like with fried rice.

Even nicer to have steamed water egg that is slightly sweet for dessert after.

It's kinda like Hiyashi Chukamen in summer time.

2 points · 20 days ago

I feel hungry.

That looks delicious!

2 points · 20 days ago

Think it’s a phenomenal idea.

Looks great. I usually slurp down my broth and then enjoy the noodles by themselves.

2 points · 20 days ago

Halfway to bibimbop

bibimmyeon!

This is a thing? I've been doing this all along. Heck, I did it this morning with an egg and peppers. This is a thing?? @_@

This is my favorite way to make ramen and I had no idea there was a name for it.

I’m a whore for broth but it’s good on occasion. I typically prefer a different noodle dish like pad Thai tho if I’m not getting broth

Trying doing Onsen egg instead of poached. An even smoother and tastier egg, trust me

A new ramen place opened in my town, with its specialty being abura soba-- I tried it for the first time and it was amazing. Definitely gonna have it again.

The best is when you make it with broth but leftovers suck it all up.

Didn't know this was a thing, I love the broths but definitely giving this a go when I have a chance.

Seems like it is just a Japanese version of lo mein

Huh. TIL the ramen place I work at doesn't serve true mazemen (we put broth in ours, just noticeably less broth compared to our other dishes).

1 point · 20 days ago

I love all ramen. I also love anything with runny egg yolk, especially noodles, pasta, and hash browns. I believe that a hard-cooked egg is an abomination outside of being deviled or in a salad of sorts.

Original Poster1 point · 20 days ago

Preach

Had never heard of mazeman until I ordered some on a cold winters day. Not what I was looking for.

I like it both ways. This way feels less like soup. More like just a pasta dish. All my kids hate broth, so even when we just packaged ramen, I drop an egg or 2 in, drain out the water and add seasonings

1 point · 18 days ago

how do you make it? looks really professional!

Original Poster1 point · 18 days ago

I posted the details in another comment, but I'll put more info here. Basically, it's pretty simple:

Boil ramen noodles like normal. Instant works, but fresh is better. Boil in plain water, no flavor packet.

Make flavorful oil: I use a mixture of 1 tbsp sesame oil, 2 tsp vinegar, 1 tap soy sauce, some ground ginger and hot sauce to taste.

Take noodles straight from boiling water to serving boil, and toss with oil.

While all that is going on, you need to prepare your toppings. Mine were pretty simple.

  • Leftover pork, sliced and heated back up in a saute pan

  • Spinach sauteed with sliced ginger and garlic

  • Smoked Bonito flakes (store bought)

  • Pickled onions

  • Poached egg (with paprika).

The whole process is actually really easy. I get two sauce pans going with water, one for the noodles, the other for the poached egg. Then I get a sautee pan going for the meat and the veg. It all happens fast, but you get the timing of it with practice.

1 point · 15 days ago

sorry for the late reply - i got the notification at the start of the weekend haha. appreciate you writing out this post! will have to try my hand at it sometime

Like it, don’t love it.

If the menu says ramen and it doesn’t come with broth I would be disappointed

3 points · 20 days ago

Well the menu would say it is mazemen, just like it would if this dish were tsukumen or tantanmen or aburasoba.

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