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TIL Anne Frank has a tampon named after her in Japan, and because the enthusiasm she displayed in her diary about getting her first period shattered a cultural taboo, the Japanese refer to a woman's first day of menstruation as “Anne’s Day”.

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level 1

I love that they appreciate the unedited version vs the version edited by her father.

I also love that this website is called theJEWniverse.

level 2
Comment deleted1 month ago(152 children)
level 3

the slightly more personal bits were awkward.

Semi related: Someone wrote some fan fiction (weird to say fan fiction with regard to the persecution of jews and the holocaust in general) where Anne survives, believes her entire family is dead, goes on to live her life, and years later is mortified to learn her personal diary is published, and that millions of people have read how she describes her vagina.

level 4
Comment deleted1 month ago(0 children)
level 5

concentrate

M8...

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level 3
1.3k points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

Uhhh, on one hand, it's important not to censor literature, on the other hand it's a bit weird to make a 13 year old girl read a diary passage (1st person) of a close in age girl exploring her body.. -out loud to a class- *edit

Idk, I think if I were teacher I would just have the kids read those parts to themselves then continue after it to the class.

It's one thing to discuss anatomy and sexuality, it's another to have a child basically talk about their own body, in front of a class.

level 4
841 points · 1 month ago

Educator here who has taught middle school, high school, college, and law school students. Seems like very poor teaching/common sense on the part of the teacher. Having a child read anything that sexually intimate out loud sounds creepy/perverted. Discussing the themes by allowing students to volunteer their reactions is one thing. But yeah, poor girl.

level 5

Honestly when I was in school taking turns reading out loud was the worst. I didn't have an experience like that, but taking turns made reading frustrating and unfun for me. It's probably to help with public speaking in some way, but I would get frustrated with how slow things were going and read ahead. Of course when you're 3 pages ahead of everyone else and get called on it makes YOU look like the idiot who wasn't following along.

level 6
140 points · 1 month ago

i hated reading out loud so much. im a good reader, but i have a slight lisp and social anxiety. ffs just let me read the passage on my own, if anything my reading comprehension went down during the big group readings because id spend have the time panicking about it being my turn soon.

level 7

One one hand I understand that. But on the other hand, reading aloud isn't all about the child themselves reading the passage. It's also about the children listening. You learn to take information from your fellow students and also learn to understand that not all people read aloud well. Some, like yourself, can have social anxiety or a lisp, or could just be god awful at reading aloud. You learn to exercise patience with the people around you. I guarantee no kid in any of your classes as a kid just yelled out loud while someone was reading slowly and was like "you know what fuck you and the level at which you read aloud!"

In any case it's also good to read aloud because you get out of that shell that keeps you from wanting to talk. It forces you to mumble coherent words out loud to 20 other kids which in itself can make you a more confident speaker as you get older.

But in this case it's fucking weird that people were made to read out Anne Frank's diary aloud. That could just be straight up fucking nerve wracking.

level 8

It seems like all of those could be covered in less time intensive ways. I always found reading aloud annoying because I read a lot faster than people talk.

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level 8

I always hated reading aloud and now that I’m in college I hate to even read a funny post aloud in fear of messing up. I think Socratic Circles are probably a better form of speaking and listening, because you can wait until you have something you’d like to speak about. Even if you never speak in them, kids still learn listening skills from the other people talking and will encourage you to share if you have anything to say.

level 8

That is not the reason. The real reason is to make sure the lazy fucks in the class have actually read the book.

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level 6
12 points · 1 month ago

I enjoyed it as it did help with my speaking, I got over being worried about my voice cracking, being suddenly nervous, stuttering and corrected my pronunciation of words! But it did give fellow students (my friend who was at the time one of the nicest people in the world now he's jaded like the rest of us.) small bursts of anxiety or nervousness.

I only let my self read the full page before following along, and volunteered often enough that I could finish the chapter in peace because everyone needs a turn to read.

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level 5

One time in 6th grade, my teacher let one of my friends “teach” the class and call on people to name different body parts. He kept calling on me to say shit like urethra. I wanted to die

level 6

Goddamn. That is some intense cringe.

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level 4

I got one better. In high school literature our teacher made us read huckleberry Finn out loud in turns

It was really fun seeing who would replace the text and say “n-word” instead vs the brave (or very racist) souls that would just blurt out the word

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level 4

That sounds just as bad as my nightmare honors English teacher that read us every single word of the color purple out loud. With her very obvious lisp.

I fully support uncensored literature in schools. But let students read and process on their own.

level 4
45 points · 1 month ago

I think the easy fix is to put off Anne Frank until an age where you no longer read aloud in front of the class.

level 5

In my high school, we did that all the way up to senior year. I remember quite well because the whole fucking class would volunteer me to do it because I was one of very few that could read aloud and not sound like Ben Stein.

EDIT: Okay, not at the front of class, but at my desk.

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level 4
61 points · 1 month ago

Confirmed pervert teacher.

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level 4

Uhhh, on one hand, it's important not to censor literature, on the other hand it's a bit weird to make a 13 year old girl read a diary passage (1st person) of a close in age girl exploring her body.

Sure, censorship is wrong, but that isn't a book on the shelf that didn't benefit from editing. Publishing a completely unedited diary might be good from a historical record standpoint, but it isn't necessarily the best way to get a story out.

level 5
55 points · 1 month ago

I don't know I think it's important to humanize her even more, people read about someone who was forced into a gas chamber having the same private thoughts and feelings we all do it makes a lot more of an impact.

level 6
24 points · 1 month ago

someone who was forced into a gas chamber

She died of disease, actually. Bergen-Belsen wasn't an extermination camp, although many of the prisoners died.

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level 3

Wasn't there some controversy around that here in the US where parents were petitioning to have the book removed from school cause of those parts?

level 4
64 points · 1 month ago

My school gave us the censored one. I didn't even know the original was released until I was just discussing it with my wife, due to reading this headline. This would have been 15 years ago, give or take.

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level 4

Yes — it’s happened several times. I think the most recent one was in Michigan, but Virginia and Alabama have also had cases against the book.

level 5

I really can't decide it this is a warranted freak out, or another example of our country's.... reservations about sexuality and nudity.

level 6

I actually teach high school English... we get around that section of the diary by reading the play version. There’s still two sketchy sections (The stage directions mention that Anne is “wearing several pairs of panties” when she first arrives in the annex and there’s one metaphorical mention of getting her period — “it’s a sweet secret happening inside of me and I long for it to happen again”)... I’ll have a few boys snicker at the panty line, but only the girls get the period line.

I guess I’ve been lucky — I’ve only had one parent refuse to let her daughter read the play in the past three years — but it was because she was afraid it would give her nightmares. The same parent threatened to get me fired when her daughter brought home a book from the classroom library that had a girl in a bikini on the cover... some parents are just weird.

level 7

Really? But they’re high schoolers, they can handle reading about a period and boobs. I can see the issue with middle schoolers or younger, but damn high schoolers need to see the real world. Not be sheltered by teachers. This is why you have so many kids going to college who aren’t prepared.

level 8

Exactly. Your soon to be adult children are going to discover the functions of the reproductive system & their own sexuality at some point (if they haven't already), whether or not you want them to. At least if you let them discover - and be educated about - those things in high school, they'll be armed with knowledge about how their bodies work, what to do to prevent unwanted pregnancies & STIs, what consent is, and so on. That's an ordinary part of life they'll have to grow accustom to. I understand that parents in part want their children to remain relatively innocent and you can't help but see this young man or woman as the child they once were... but I would think the potential consequences are too big to hamper them because of that.

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level 3

Tumescence.

Do you happen to be a friend of DeSoto?

level 4
Comment deleted1 month ago(0 children)
level 5

friend of DeSoto

Same idea as friend of Dorothy, but way more public shame.

Well, not really. It's about Star Trek.

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level 3

You just taught me a new word.

Time to use it in a sentence

level 3

I love your language.... tumescence. Well done.

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level 2
Comment deleted1 month ago(8 children)

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level 2

♪♫♬ words are flowing out like kiddush wine into elijah's cup / the sizzle of the latkes makes its way across the jewniverse ♪♫♬

level 3

baroookh ata adoneinoooo

oyyyy

level 3
8 points · 1 month ago

I appreciate how well the syllables of your words are matched to the original lyrics, bravo!

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level 2

very eJEWcational!

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level 1
1.7k points · 1 month ago

That's kind of adorable.

level 2
791 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

It's also kinda time-machiney. This is an article about a product that was launched in the 1960s, and both the product, and the company making it, ceased to exist decades ago.

It's kinda like saying "TIL Americans keep rocks as pets."

level 3
103 points · 1 month ago

You don't keep a rock as a pet?

level 4

Mine is still alive.

level 5

Omg I forgot to feed my rock!

level 6
17 points · 1 month ago

He ded

level 5

Can you smell what he's cooking?

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level 4

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level 3
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4 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

>implying

Technically I'm not American but Canadian :

https://imgur.com/2lmIAEL

her name is Josephine

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level 2
267 points · 1 month ago

And a little fucked up. Exactly what I would expect from japan

level 3

Damn, that's a good way of putting it. Gotta love Japanese culture.

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level 2

Or not.

It “others”public education about menstruation in Japan. Michael Palin said modern Japanese tendencies to identify the expression of “taboos” with Caucasian Westerners allows the Japanese to skirt responsibility and blame somebody else for their culture’s oppressive reflexivity about these “taboos”.

level 3

Can you explain that to me but slower? I hope I don’t sound rude, I’m genuinely curious about this idea.

level 4

Basically Japan blames their cultural problems on the West

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level 4
18 points · 1 month ago

I'd also love to know more. From what I understand you are saying that the japanese find it easier to accept something as normal if they can blame "westerners" for starting the practice?

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level 4
16 points · 1 month ago

I think what they're saying is that:

In the West we assume our attitudes to menstruation are normal and the standard. Therefore different cultural attitudes are weird. This is the process of "Othering": assuming you are the norm and others are deviations of you.

Reflexivity is the study of oneself in relation to a topic. So Japan is reflecting on its taboos around menstruation, and the tools that they're using to do this is Anne Frank's diary.

However, given that the West still has large taboos about menstruation (Google "period shaming") it allows Japan to avoid learning from self-reflection and say "Oh, they're doing it too", and continue to perpetrate taboos.

That's my subjective interpretation of what u/smellslikesnow said; they could have meant something completely different.

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level 1
2.2k points · 1 month ago

oh Japan

level 2
522 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

Anne Frank tampons, cheese flavored ice cream, and tentacle porn all go quite well together.

Let me correct myself, cheese flavored ice cream is popular in the Philippines. I remember binge-watching Bizarre Foods With Andrew Zimmern for a day straight years and years ago, just got my foods and countries switched up.

level 3

Cheese flavored ice cream is delightful.

level 4

It doesn't even taste like cheese imo. It's great though.

level 5
38 points · 1 month ago

Sounded weird at first, but the more i thought about it, the more sense it makes. Both are forms of dairy. Cheese is delicious, as is sugar. I'd give it a try.

level 6

Yeah it's not crazy new either. Salted caramel is an ice cream flavor and there are parts of the U.S. where they put a slice of cheddar on their apple pie.

level 7

Wisconsin or Upstate New York? Those places seem to me like chedder cheese and apple pie places.

level 8

Not in Upstate New York, at least not my neck of the woods. We only put cheddar on our steamed hams

level 9

I'm from Utica and I've never put cheddar on my steamed hams.

level 10

It's more of an Albany topping.

level 9

My MIL is from Potsdam area in Northern NY and she’s a devoted cheddar on apple pie lady.

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level 8

Never heard of it in Wisconsin, sounds like it could be good tho

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level 8

Vermont

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level 6

Isn't just like cheesecake ice cream?

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level 4

Does it taste like cheesecake, or is it more like cheddar flavored icecream?

level 5

I've had parmesan, goat cheese, and cheddar ice creams before. All were wonderful, but goat cheese and parmesan were the best. It seems to me that tangier cheeses work better.

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level 3

Japan likes Red bean ice cream

level 4

Red bean everything is so good tho

level 5
14 points · 1 month ago

Red bean bao get in my face nao

level 4

So do I. It's fantastic. You should try their purple potato ice cream too. Good stuff.

level 5

Is purple potato different from Taro Root?

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level 5

I've been to Japan a couple of times. Once you try some of the weird stuff you find out it's actually good.

level 6
8 points · 1 month ago

If you say that sweet red beans are "the weird stuff" you did not even open the box.

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level 3

Filipino here, Cheese ice cream is delicious

level 3
Comment deleted1 month ago(4 children)
level 4

Because strange stuff at home isn't strange; that's what makes it home.

If someone knocked cheese ice cream I'd just mention Cheesecake.

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level 3
22 points · 1 month ago

and you don't need to be Helen Keller to see it!

level 4
level 4

Now hold on there

level 4

Can Hellen Keller see why kids love the taste of Cinnamon Toast Crunch?

...no, she can’t.

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level 3

In America we have manly yogurt and feet porn. Every country has their weird thing.

level 4

Foot fetishism definitely isn't a US-exclusive thing.

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level 3
3 points · 1 month ago

Considering how many flavors of kit-kat Japan has you can probably just assume they have every food and flavor you can imagine, some just might be exclusively in kit-kat form though.

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level 2

Are tampons pixalated in Japan as well?

level 3
50 points · 1 month ago

only once they start to be inserted?

level 4

Usually that's when all the sobbing and whimpers start too.

level 5

eiiuh eiiuh aaahhh aaahhh eiiuh

level 6

Yamete Tampon-sama!!

level 6

I said hayyy, what's going onnn

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level 3

see for yourself (extremely nsfw)

level 4

that is not at all what inserting a tampon feels like.

level 5

who do you think would know better, you or a virgin 42 year old male from japan who wrote the source material for that?

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level 5

at all#

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level 2
85 points · 1 month ago

They "shatter" taboos, get weirdly obsessed with them and make it weird.

level 3

There are many american taboos that we make weird, just like everywhere. I don’t see how Japan is different.

Also, mainstream Japan is much more conservative than PornHub is. Again, like many (most?) places.

level 4

I had a Japanese mate in high school who would watch the weiderst fetish hentai without hesitating, but would freak out at the gross obscenity of a vanilla porno where they showed genitals

level 5
14 points · 1 month ago

I went to high school and university in Japan. Literally zero people freaked out about uncensored porn. Most people watched western porn instead of Japanese porn anyways. Your friend was just weird.

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level 2
34 points · 1 month ago

Japan is amazing in so many ways, but their rigid culture is semi-killing their entire society nowdays. Taking things to court, arguing for your rights, discrimination, sexism, workplace- environment etc. are all going to shit which is so godamn sad.

For example, hardly anyone in Japan used medication (or shrinks) against depression or such. It wasn't until a company made a slogan- and commercial about how "depression is just a cold for the soul" that anti-depressant purchases were raised by over 67%+.

Now I know medication isn't a solution, for some people it is incase you got a pathological disorder. But that's the point, even trying to fight the symptoms of the culture is fucking taboo in Japan, let alone the origin.

As I said, I love japan overall, but being scandinavian I can identify all to well with the "we don't talk about it" culture.

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level 1
878 points · 1 month ago

Dutch influence everywhere....

Still though, it's nice to see that it shattered a taboo! Periods are a normal thing and should be discussable.

level 2
462 points · 1 month ago

Well, the dutch did bring many things into japan, like clocks, and guns, and jesus

level 3

If I remember the Dutch didn't do much with Jesus in Japan, which is why they weren't entirely kicked out like the Portuguese, just forced to only trade on a tiny island and killed if they landed anywhere else.

level 4
123 points · 1 month ago

Was just joking :p, was a reference to a video made by bill wurtz "history of japan"

level 5

Oh yes, I remember that. Knock knock, it's europe.

level 6

Knock knock. It's the United States. With big boats. With guns. Gunboats.

"Open the country," they said. "Stop having it be closed."

level 7
36 points · 1 month ago

Oh the times have changed. Japan is now free trading with the EU and USA is regressing into protectionism.

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level 4

The Japanese of the time didn’t understand the nuances of Catholic vs Protestant, at least according to William Adams’ letters. So Tokugawa saw the Dutch as anti-Catholic...and several of his enemies (pre-Sekigahara) were converted Catholic daimyo along with their armies. So he saw Dutch as potential allies and took Adams, who was British but under Dutch employ, into his confidence and elevated him to an extremely important position. After Tokugawa became the shogun his primary role was to protect Japan from external threats, he saw Catholics as potential conquerors and the Dutch as potential allies.

Subsequent generations of the shogunate became more isolationist and Christianity virtually disappeared from Japan. The Dutch position became more precarious and they couldn’t evangelize without risking angering the shogunate so they focused on sharing technology in exchange for trade exclusivity.

It’s interesting to think about if Tokugawa’s son and grandson had continued the relationship he began through Adams, Japan would have been able to to keep up with the West in terms of sea power while providing more advanced medicine, metallurgy, etc, and this would have eventually either prevented the Meiji restoration or else made Japan more technologically advanced. Then looking at the two world wars, had they happened the same way, Japan would have been more advanced and could have changed the outcome. Of course there are infinite variables but it’s one of those intriguing what-if scenarios.

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level 3

So that's cool, but everyone's still fighting each other for control. Now with guns!!

level 3

I feel like no one got your Bill Wurtz reference.

But I did, my friend. I did.

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level 3

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shing%C5%8D,_Aomori

Nah. Jesus brought Jesus to Japan.

level 4
3 points · 1 month ago

Is this from the manga adaptation of The Bible?

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level 3

A lot of Japanese medical terms are also derived from Dutch, because the Dutch trading post on Deshima was the first prolonged source of Western medical knowledge in Japan.

level 4
11 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

Yes, Dutch and German. A lot of them travelled with VOC ships and were in contact with Japanese scientists and doctors.

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level 2

I may have misunderstood the article, but I thought the taboo was related to how the Japanese viewed victims of WWII

“She symbolizes the ultimate World War II victim,” Lewkowicz told JTA. “And that’s how most Japanese consider their own country because of the atomic bombs — a victim, never a perpetrator.”

The “Anne” tampon was perhaps the earliest example of what Japanese literary scholar Norihiro Kato called the “cuteification” of Anne Frank, and of Japanese history. “It has neutralized issues that are too painful to deal with by rendering them purely aesthetic, and harmless — by making them ‘cute.’”

From this I inferred that before this time it was taboo to see allied victims as victims and admit to Japanese wrongdoings during WWII. I believe this was the taboo in question. However, the wording of the title seems to imply that the taboo was related to periods, and I have little knowledge on Japanese culture and taboos.

I could be wrong. Anyone else have thoughts on this?

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level 2

I agree. Isn’t it a normal consequence of humans being fertile year-round?

level 3
55 points · 1 month ago

Yeah, but sexuality has rarely been "normal/widely accepted" in any part of human history.

level 4

What about all those fertility statues from Mesopotamia and all those Orgy arts in Greek culture?

level 5
27 points · 1 month ago

After the Greeks fell and the church started to gain power (with all the Roman stuff happening, their emporer for example, became Christian), they quickly ended this all.

Previously, in both the Greeks and romans I believe, it was normal for gay couples to exist. Men/women roles were heavily present so the "top" was the male and the "bottom" female. Is that the right way to do it? Not really. Did they do a great job at the time? I believe so.

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level 3
12 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

I've always thought what would be the consequences of womens' fertility being controlled by density, like with grasshoppers/locusts. The more people around the less fertile. We'd eventually be able to control it with hormones but seems like it would be a pretty cool natural overpopulation governor.

level 4
6 points · 1 month ago

That seems incredibly hard to control with hormones compared to our "standard."

So I need different amounts of each hormone depending on where I live? And if I go somewhere for a few days it can completely duck it up?

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level 1

Sometimes i wonder how Anne Frank would have reacted to the world idolizing her nowadays. Like, she wrote the diary with the expectation that it wouldnt be read. She had no conception about how famous she would be after she died. I mean, for Anne, Japan was the enemy at the time. Could you imagine if she landed in the 21st century and saw that the Japanese named a tampon after her?

I'm not saying it's a bad thing at all, just mind blowing.

level 2

Actually she was planning on publishing it when she got the chance, as she'd heard of other people publishing their journals and wanted to be a writer, iirc. The fact that she was living through a rather historic time and having a unique experience was probably not lost on her. Though it's possible she would have edited those parts out, though we'll never know.

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level 1
[deleted]
244 points · 1 month ago

this was just a single TV ad from around 1961

level 2

When I lived there in 2002 I learned about “Anne no he” (Anne’s Day) as being the first day of your period. So it’s not just one ad or anything.

I did not realize (until now!) that it meant the first day of your FIRST period. I had a suprise visit from Aunt Flo while I was there, and I told my host sisters about it using this phrase. They understood but were probably confused why someone so old was only just then entering into womanhood ...

level 3
[deleted]
59 points · 1 month ago

I just did a more intense google search and it looks like some people do use it, but the meaning depends on the person. Also, I don't think people under 40 say it: https://twitter.com/okasanman/status/996621650425626624

level 3

By the way, day is "hi", not " he".

level 4

Yeah, 'Anne no he' would be 'Anne's fart'.

level 5

Her first fart

level 6

And that's how the soldiers found her and the book ends.

level 7
10 points · 1 month ago

What a travesty that was. I am glad they left it out of the mueseums, for her sake.

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level 2

Lived in Japan for a good bit and have not only never seen those, I have never heard people use that term for their period.

It's just another case of people associating something weird that happened once in Japan as an everyday occurrence there.

level 3

I'm with you, all I know is "josei no hi" which means 'womens day'. I worked in a women dominated office and then later a school. So it came up a few times.

Hey, are you okay?

Yeah, women's day.

Ahh. Need anything?

No thank you, I am okay.

level 1

My wife has never heard of this. Says this is just another thing foreigners think Japanese people do because they interviewed some fringe/kitschy group in Tokyo and western media wrote an article on it.

Source: is Japanese

But hey, I think it’s fun!

level 2
23 points · 1 month ago

My wife says she's familiar with the term, but has never used it herself, as it's slang from her parents' generation (so probably people in their 60s and older).

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level 1

Uh... anyone know what's on that finger? For sure nota tampon

level 2

It's probably a finger glove. OB are small tampons that don't come with an applicator so you just push them up there yourself with a finger. A finger glove would have been a nice thing to sell alongside them, though I know the boxes I used when younger didn't have those.

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level 2

Yeah I'm confused about this too.

level 1

As good as this is I feel like they took the wrong lesson from Anne Frank.

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level 1

When I first read this I thought the tampon was named after Anne Frank because it gets hidden in a cramped space

level 2

like the back of a volkswagen?

level 3
51 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

that is a very uncomfortable place to fuck

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level 3

Fuck, what's that a reference to again? I forgot.

level 4
13 points · 1 month ago

I am pretty sure it's mallrats

level 4
level 5
5 points · 1 month ago

Oh neat, a schooner!

level 6

It's a sailboat you dummy.

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level 1

I mean it was in her personal, secretive DIARY

level 2

She did write in her diary that she hoped after the war she would be able to share her experiences through her diary though...

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level 1
23 points · 1 month ago

Anne Frank is a trailblazer. Period.

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level 1
9 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

  Copied from a website I found:

A passage from The Diary of Anne Frankdated March 24, 1944—initially censored by Anne's father—poignantly illustrates the struggle that many women of all ages endure while trying to understand their bodies and their sexuality.

"I'd like to ask Peter [Peter Van Daan who, along with his family, joined the Franks in hiding in the Secret Annex] whether he knows what girls look like down there. I don't think boys are as complicated as girls. You can easily see what boys look like in photographs or pictures of male nudes, but with women it's different. In women, the genitals, or whatever they're called, are hidden between their legs. Peter has probably never seen a girl up close. To tell you the truth, neither have I. Boys are a lot easier. How on earth would I go about describing a girl's parts? I can tell from what he said that he doesn't know exactly how it all fits together. He was talking about the "Muttermund" (cervix), but that's on the inside, where you can't see it. Everything's pretty well arranged in us women. Until I was eleven or twelve, I didn't realize there was a second set of labia on the inside, since you couldn't see them. What's even funnier is that I thought urine came out of the clitoris. I asked Mother one time what that little bump was, and she said she didn't know. She can really play dumb when she wants to! ... But to get back to the subject. How on earth can you explain what it all looks like without any models? Shall I try anyway? Okay, here goes! ... When you're standing up, all you see from the front is hair. Between your legs there are two soft, cushiony things, also covered with hair, which press together when you're standing, so you can't see what's inside. They separate when you sit down, and they're very red and quite fleshy on the inside. In the upper part, between the outer labia, there's a fold of skin that, on second thought, looks like a kind of blister. That's the clitoris. Then come the inner labia, which are also pressed together in a kind of crease. When they open up, you can see a fleshy little mound, no bigger than the top of my thumb. The upper part has a couple of small holes in it, which is where the urine comes out. The lower part looks as if it were just skin, and yet that's where the vagina is. You can barely find it, because the folds of skin hide the opening. The hole's so small I can hardly imagine how a man could get in there, much less how a baby could come out. It's hard enough trying to get your index finger inside. That's all there is, and yet it plays such an important role!"

Also, from another source:

P.S. I forgot to mention the important news that I'm probably going to get my period soon. I can tell because I keep finding a whitish smear in my panties, and mother predicted it would start soon. I can hardly wait. It's such a momentous event. Too bad I can't use sanitary napkins, but you can't get them anymore, and Mama's tampons can only be used by women who've had a baby. (Monday, November 2, 1942)

I think that what's happening to me is so wonderful, and I don't just mean the changes taking place on the outside of my body, but also on the inside. I never discuss myself or any of these things with the others, which is why I have to talk about them to myself. Whenever I get my period (and that's only been three times), I have the feeling that in spite of all the pain, discomfort and mess, I'm carrying around a sweet secret. So even though it's a nuisance, in a certain way I'm always looking forward to the time when I'll feel that secret inside me once again. (Thursday, January 6, 1944)

I hadn't had my period for more than two months, but it finally started last Sunday. Despite the mess and the bother, I'm glad it hasn't deserted me. (Wednesday, May 3, 1944)

level 1

She symbolizes the ultimate World War II victim,” Lewkowicz told JTA. “And that’s how most Japanese consider their own country because of the atomic bombs — a victim, never a perpetrator.

No Japan, you were the bad guys. We nuked you for a reason.

level 2
240 points · 1 month ago

The atrocities committed by the Japanese in Nanjing were so bad they resulted in the head of the local Nazi party sheltering the Chinese from them.

level 3

TIL

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level 3
69 points · 1 month ago

Yeah, because they weren't Jewish.

level 4

I can assure you that John Rabe wasn't an antisemite considering that he was member of international community of Westerners living in Nanking. He even supported his Jewish friend who lost his job.

level 4
[deleted]
9 points · 1 month ago

many german businessmen joined the nazi party for the competitive advantage that gave them, while that is deplorable in it's own way it does not mean they shared any ideals with the nazis, it just means making money was more important to them morals.

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level 4

not all nazis were antisemites, though of course many were.

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level 3

I'd reccomend "City of Life and Death" for anyone who wants to see a fantastic, but brutal, movie about the Nanjing Massacre. A lot of it focuses on his involvement.

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level 2

Teaming up with nazis pretty much disqualifies their victimhood.

level 3

that pales in comparison to what they did to chinese citizens and pow's.

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level 3

Even Nazis who lived in China were disgusted when they saw what atrocities Japanese did.

level 4

Appropriate username?

level 3
64 points · 1 month ago

Nah their treatment of othet Asians is what disqualifies them

level 4

Why not both?

level 5
24 points · 1 month ago

Cause one was a lot worse than the other?

level 6

Conspirating with a holocaust and performing one. I don't know if you really want to start ranking those.

level 7
8 points · 1 month ago

Ehhh, I think accessory to murder is below murder, so I'd say accessory to genocide is below genocide. Both are pretty fucking bad though.

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level 2

Think about it though, the Japanese government censored a lot of stuff about the war. The atomic bombs alone were a taboo topic until the mid to late 50s (around the time of Gojira's debut).

With the government telling you that you the US just decided to drop hellfire on two major production cities for no reason, there's no wonder they thought themselves as the noble losers.

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level 2
109 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

This comment is directed at you and many who replied to you:

As if regular Japanese people had any choice. Unlike in Germany, the Japanese citizenry had no say in who held the positions of Emperor, Prime Minister, or any military leadership. The lack of empathy towards the Japanese civilians who were incinerated and irradiated is very sad indeed. I mean you may think the use of the atomic bombs was the best choice the USA could make to end the war with minimal death and suffering (although there is plenty of reason to disagree); but still a little respect for people who dragged their bodies into the Ota river to die as their skin was falling off would seem appropriate.

Yes, the Japanese military perpetrated horrendous crimes against humanity. These actions were concealed from the rest of the Japanese citizenry. The civilians of Japan were doubly victims: of both militaristic tyrants and the doctrine of total war.

I wish everyone could go to the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum and see how horribly those people suffered. But the least you could do is look at some pictures and find an ounce of pity in your heart for the many men women and children who didn't know anything about Nanking or Manila or Unit 731. They were just people doing the best they could do in the midst of a fucked up situation they had no control over.

level 3

To reinforce your point simply, it's completely possible to have empathy for the people of Japan and the innocent human lives that were lost due to atomic bombs being dropped on two major cites, while at the same time understanding that making the choice to drop those bombs was most likely the lesser of two evils and condemning the horrendous war crimes the Japanese government and military committed.

Please let this never happen again.

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level 3
47 points · 1 month ago

I don't think many people here are making the point that the Japanese civilians deserved to be nuked for the evils committed by their overlords.

The point is that the historical revisionism that's happening in Japan right now is pretty much mainstream, and the Japanese people who think that the country was a victim of Western powers (and ignore their country's perpetration of massive war crimes) are sorely mistaken.

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level 2

Those atomics bombs saved many more Japanese lives than they've taken.

War crime denial is pretty common in Japan.

level 3
53 points · 1 month ago

True. Though I do think most Japanese citizens admit that the bombs, though catastrophic for two major cities, were necessary evils as the 2nd bomb essentially ended the war with Japan instantly. Without them, the Japanese (and American) casualties would have been so much higher.

level 4
15 points · 1 month ago

The US ordered so many Purple Hearts in anticipation of invading Japan that they are still giving them to vets of Iraq and Afghanistan 70 years later.

level 4
18 points · 1 month ago

Yup, and even if the US hadn’t invaded and blockaded the island, significantly more Japanese civilians would have died of starvation than were killed by the bombs.

level 4

People who bitch and whine about atomic bombs, have no clue about history. On mainland alone Japanese had 4 million military personnel, while they trained the whole population, 30 million to resist Americans with anything from bamboo spears to rocks.

A study done for Secretary of War Henry Stimson's staff by William Shockley estimated that invading Japan would cost 1.7–4 million American casualties, including 400,000–800,000 fatalities, and five to ten million Japanese fatalities.

They should have tried the Emperor, this legitimization only led to the denial they have today.

level 5
39 points · 1 month ago

If they had tried the Emperor, the insurgency would have been horrific, and likely would have reignited the war.

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level 2
5 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

Doesn't mean they can't also be victims. My great-Uncle, a man I greatly admire, was a prison of War of the Japanese who was nearly starved to death and still thought of many of the Japanese as victims.

level 3
4 points · 1 month ago

Your great Uncle sounds like a great person. I wish some of the people in these comments were more like him.

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level 1

. .. the Japanese refer to a woman's first day of menstruation as “Anne’s Day”.

That's just not true though. Never heard anyone here ever say that.

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level 1
10 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

I wrote about her first period in my book review in 7th grade and my teacher marked me off and said it was not in the book. I resent that woman to this day.

edit: said 8th grade, meant 7th grade

level 1

Interesting that they had a cultural taboo surrounding periods considering what their flag looks like

level 2
11 points · 1 month ago

What people does not have a taboo about it?

level 3

Navajo

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level 1

That's a realllllyyyy lighthearted take on the life of someone your country supported being murdered....

Then again, we have a sports team named Redskins in the US so I can't really talk shit

level 2

Also girls getting periods for the first time and Anne Frank fans are probably not the same people who decided Japan should join the Axis.

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level 1

I'm a Japanese. Literally never heard of this ever.

level 1
13 points · 1 month ago

"Anne no hi" (Anne's day) is also a play on words or close enough to "ano hi" (that day). Japanese like puns and love to be discrete. Having a phrase for 'that day' that also doubles as a day named after a cultural icon sounds like something the Japanese culture would really take to.

level 1

That's pretty cool. Apparently they are also very much into Anne of Green Gables.

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level 1

We read the Diary in middle school, and as a joke, everyone insisted that this one guy in our class (very popular student athlete sorta guy) read for Anne. None of us knew that the Diary discussed these things. We just childishly wanted to see a jock read Anne Frank, but we ended up watching him stammer through an entire page about her 'sweet secret.'

I will never forget that phrase.

level 1

her legend lives on within us all, in one way or another.

level 1

NOBODY WHO IS LIVING IN JAPAN HAS EVER EVEN HEARD OF THIS, PLS STOP

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