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904

Somwtimes I find myself acting like paula dean or that BAM! guy when I'm cooking and just pretend someones filming me and I have my own youtube channel or w/e and I'm explaining everything I'm doing to the fishtank in my living room. It just makes it so much more fun and I'm like always telling myself that I could totally have my own cooking show grillin up pork chops or shelling shrimp and sauteing mushrooms n shit. Like I could be the bob ross of cooking and just whisper to ppl that they can do anything and if it doesnt come out perfect that's ok cuz we all make mistak----I mean happy little accidents. Idk maybe its just the booze talking cuz I'm kinda drunk right now from the fantastic wine I had from tonight's meal but does anyone else do this? Who do you channel/portray?

Edit: Emeril Lagasse!! That's the name of the BAM guy

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Summer for me is all about burgers on the grill and kidos playing in the yard. Once fall hits I start gravitating towards creamy pasta dishes and roasted vegetables. But I don't have a dish that defines fall the same way burgers define summer - what about you?

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Hey Reddit: Want to write better? Eliminate grammatical mistakes, wipe out wordiness, and let your ideas shine. See for yourself why over 10 million users are hooked on Grammarly's free writing app.

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...They kept the fire on, they introduced food when it was available etc. And everything you had to do was waiting for a simmered dish... It was supossely a very practical and good way to cook... I just wonder what could happen if we did that today: a constant crock...

What do you think?

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Hey guys, looking for some pointers here. My wife wants salmon tonight for her birthday dinner and I normally just put a little salt and pepper on it and bake it in the oven with lemon slices on top and it turns out very good. However, this time I want to make a pan sauce with it. I was thinking of doing some white wine, chicken stock, dill and crushed garlic and reducing that, then adding some butter and lemon juice and reducing that a little. How does that sound?

Also going to roast some asparagus with some olive oil, salt, pepper and some grated parmesan, but every time I roast asparagus I always over cook it. Any time and temperature tips? Same temp as the salmon?

Thanks!

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Had a bit of an unexpected cash boost the other day. I live in a pretty rural region that produces a lot of food, and I've had my eye on some locally produced pierogi and farm raised eggs that cost a pretty penny compared to the usual grocery store fare.

So I figured I'd treat myself.

I could tell from the moment I tried to crack an egg into the pan that these were a little different. The shells actually stood up to the first tap, and even when they did crack, they didn't just shatter outright and actually stayed together. Once they were in the pan, the whites didn't just run all over the place, and the yolks were a deep sunny yellow. In short, they're beautiful. ;_;

In the same vein, these pierogi are fucking incredible. I picked up a pound each of mushroom and saurkraut, and a beef and pork mix as well. I don't think I can ever go back to bland, textureless grocery store pierogi ever again. The dough didn't just disintegrate at the lightest touch after being boiled, and crisped up well in a hot buttery pan without any tearing. While the meat ones were my favourite, the fillings of each were packed with flavour and perfectly seasoned. I only wish I'd had the foresight to grab some sour cream to complete the dish.

I'm gonna have a real hard time going back to regular boring old eggs. I'm just straight up never buying grocery store pierogi ever again though, if I can't afford these ones I'll just find something else to eat.

How about you, have you made any culinary discoveries you couldn't go back from? Something so good it changed your perspective forever?

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My title is very clickbait-y and I'm going to justify it with both a really nice mac and cheese recipe and demonstration of a useful pasta technique. I sub starch in the pasta water for the flour in the roux, and it turns out way creamier and richer than you'd expect. A lot of us know to save our pasta water for red sauce, but it's also perfect for a creamy sauce as well. I personally discovered this through Bon Appetit's Alfredo recipe. I can't say much about how creamy it stays in the fridge, mainly because I never leave any leftovers. The best part is that the ingredients are everyday essentials, with no niche stuff like evaporated milk or sodium citrate or something. And it's better than all the other "easy" mac and cheese recipes out there. I actually regret learning how to do this because it's so addicting. It scales perfectly and everything can be eyeballed to make an amazing product. Here goes:

Ingredients:

  • 1 pound pasta of your choosing (I'm obsessed with Garofalo-brand stuff which is really starchy, but cut it to a 1/2 pound because it expands so much lol)

  • 4 tablespoons butter

  • 8 ounces shredded cheese (good choices are cheddar or a blend with cheddar like 4-cheese or monterey jack)

  • 4 ounces parmesan (freshly grated is best but packaged works fine, adjust to how much you like parmesan or sub with other cheese)

  • 2 cups milk (add more butter for lower-fat milk)

  • 2 teaspoons mustard (Dijon or yellow)

  • Dash of cayenne or whatever spices you're feeling (optional)

  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions:

  1. Boil and salt water for the pasta

  2. Cook the pasta al dente according to the box. Once finished, retain about a cup or so of pasta water and drain the rest

  3. Over medium-low heat, add the butter to the pasta water and stir in to combine

  4. Stir in the shredded cheese and parmesan to combine

  5. Stir in the milk to combine

  6. Stir in the mustard, spices, and seasoning to taste. Adjust proportions including milk and cheese to reach desired consistency

  7. Fold the pasta into the sauce and serve

And that's about it. The first time I did this I also stirred in a sausage-jalapeno-mushroom-onion mixture and that tasted about as good as it sounds. The cheese sauce absorbs additional flavors super well and doesn't overwhelm other toppings. It's super versatile and can be easily personalized to everyone's mac preferences, and more importantly doesn't have a roux involved :P Jk, all mac and cheese is good mac and cheese, I just think this is a really convenient recipe to have around. If anyone tries it, tell me if it made up for the bad title ;)

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I made just a simple packet of country sausage gravy (Pioneer) two days ago for meatloaf and mashed potatoes.

Last night I warmed it up for leftovers and my son and I both noticed that it tasted a good bit better.

What have you found that tastes better when it's warmed up after a day or two?

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Guys I’m having a chili cook off at work and need this to be the best. Let me hear your best chili recipes using ground beef.

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I've been looking for a cookbook that has recipes with a main dish and a side dish or two listed in the same recipe or that provides suggestions of which mains go with which sides.

Most cookbooks I've seen are organized by bizarre or cutesy categories but as a pretty incompetent cook I really just want guidance on how to cook a meal. I know there are other resources for these things, but I'd really like to find an all-in-one cookbook that has recipes and has designed full meals around them.

Thanks!!!

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Turns out, hurts like hell...

Who'd'a thunk it?

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Hey all. Im 26 in my last semester of college and the only one who cooks in the house. I just discovered this sub and have gained some pretty good ideas through reading along.

I recently picked through a friends garden and came up with some orange tomatoes, some romas, a few onions and a TON of these super hot little red "super chili" peppers.

I'm having trouble figuring out how to use them. They're pewtty small and hand chopping still leaves them in nuclear sized pieces. I was thinking some sort of hot sauce (never made but we have a food processor) or maybe some type od hot curry style? Thanks for any tips

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https://youtu.be/QNQbk6x9ZW8 This is a very easy and tasty dish to make. If you've never had Tilapia or arent sure how to prepare it you'll want to give this one a try. There is also a dipping sauce you'll want to make for added flavour. I hope you guys enjoy our video. Thank you

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I am.in Canada, and have a bunch of options:

1- Walmart, Homesense, Bed Bath & Beyond, Winners/Marshall's etc....

2) Kitchen Stuff Plus/Warehouse Sales

3) any other home department or kitchen store...Hudson's Bay??

I need to basically revamp my kitchen fully, but since it'll be really expensive I'll start with the basics like ( Wooden utensils+one or two pots+basic bakeware)

Edit: I typed this in a hurry, ofocurse Amazon is always included. (Decided to buy cast iron pan and instant pot from them) (Don't know what else to buy from Amazon)

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The uglier the mug, the better! Sign up for the Reddit Gifts Ugly Mugs exchange by October 1st to get matched!

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I need a gift for my boss who is very well-off. One of the things I know about her is how much she loves cooking and food, so I thought this sub might be able to help. I am heading to her birthday celebration in a couple hours. Any ideas for a gift that would be quick to pick up, relatively inexpensive, and something you would appreciate as an amateur chef?

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I’ve got the day off tomorrow and kind of want to invest some time in a great meal. What do you make when you have unlimited time? I have access to almost anything as far as food prep goes, including sous vide, slow cooker, pressure cooker, wood pizza oven (Uuni), but I don’t have a smoker. I’m looking for ideas.

Things that immediately come to my mind:

  • sous vide French Dip on homemade bread
  • coq au vin
  • boef bourgugnone (probably spelled wrong)
  • chili
  • pulled pork sandwiches - would have to be slow cooker / braised without the smoker though
  • early Christmas? Could go all out and do a roast bird, stuffing, glazed root veg etc.

What would you make if you had a day free for nothing but a single great meal?

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I've dabbled with quite a few oat milk recipes but I think I need to start moving towards amylases to get the foaming qualities of animal milk.

Anyone have tips?

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The dish constisted of white fish in a red curry/ sauce, and the sauce itself wasn't very thick. I had it in a Pan Asian restaurant in Britain if that helps.

I would love to be able to cook it myself, but I have no idea what was in it. Any ideas on what it is I'm talking about?

Edit: It seems unlikely that I'll find what I'm thinking of, but if anyone has any good fish curry recipes then please send them my way.

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Greetings wonderful people from r/cooking. I hope that you fine folks can share your fool-proof cookies recipes. I'm quite confident in my cooking. However, I think cookies are like my nemesis. Sometimes like today, I struggle to make a simple chocolate chip cookies? I don't understand? This is the recipe I loosely follow and this is the result. The only few thing modifications i did including only browning the butter, skipping the egg yolk, reducing the sugar, freezing the cookie dough and adding a touch of sea salt on top. It should not change the thing that much right? Why is it more of a chocolate cookie than a chocolate chip cookie? I made cookie a few times before and I failed almost every single time. Why is it so crumbly and buttery instead of soft and chewy? At this rate, I feel like I would never be able to make a competent cookie to give away.

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I love making Thai food like curries and Tom Kha Gai. Last time I tried to make the soup, I opened my can of coconut milk and it smelled almost like cat food. I havent done this in a long time but I feel like that's not normal. Also I have read not to stir coconut milk on the stove too much or you risk separating it, but every can I open is already separated, I had to take my immersion blender to the broth just to get it smooth, am I doing something wrong?

My other question is, is the coconut milk like Silk that you buy in the milk aisle just as good for cooking or do you need the canned stuff you find at the asian market?

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Spicy Red Chilli / Garlic Chutney Recipe: Here

Hot & Spicy Red Chilli Chutney / Milagai Chutney / Kara Chutney is a perfect side dish for Idli and Dosa. It is made of 2 main ingredients, red chilly and garlic. To make it less spicy, you can add some gingerly oil to it and serve.

Recipe!

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I love eggplant. I mainly use Italian eggplant, sometimes chinese.

My go to recipes are usually:

Babagunsh

Eggplant lasagna

Eggplant spread: either with tomato and garlic or roasted onions,peppers and cilantro

Eggplant teriyaki

Eggplant Massaman curry

Georgian Style eggplant rolls

Feta stuffed eggplant rolls

Tomato pepper eggplant rolls

Eggplant caponata

I think that may be it for my culinary eggplant repertoire.

So please share any recipes you have for one of my favorite vegetables!

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I was thinking if there's a thing such as pickling meat? like aging meat in vinegar for a couple of weeks. or like marinating the meat for ling time In my culture ( Iranian ) sour pickled vegetables ( Torshi ) are a huge part of the food and they taste awesome.

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Well more of a fast food place really. But we serve mostly chicken. Kind of like a little bit more fancy KFC. There is no competition, I am the only chicken restaurant in my small town. But I would not have gotten here if it wasn't for this subreddit. So once again I seek advice from you champions of food service.

I serve fried chicken, fried in a pressure fryer. I am working on my own breading recipe but for now I use one bought from a supplier. My problem is that the previous owners use a Henny Penny heat cabinet or oven or whatever to keep the chicken hot for some time after frying it has a water compartment that you are supposed to keep filled with water yo leep food moist, but I feel like the crispyness of the chicken is lost after just a small while in there.

I thought about losing the water but I don't want dry chicken either. Opinions ?

The heating cabinet is set to 70°c and has a sealed door and a few exhaust vents. Sorry if there is some broken english, it is not my first language.

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