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Was his existence just another of the quirks of the Fargo universe?

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So my theory is that Gloria is the robot from her “grandpa’s” book. With the non reaction to door sensors and automatic sinks, because she’s the robot, searching for a purpose. Thoughts?

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Link Here

The season is going to take place in the 1950’s, where Chris rock is going to play the head of of an African American crime syndicate that is going to war with the Italian Mafia in Kansas City

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I'm watching s1e7 so no spoilers please, don't answer if it breaks the experience.

In the opening of every episode it says "At the request of the survivors, names have been chamged. Out of respect for the dead, the rest has been told exactly as it occured". How they know exaclty what's true and that it's not made up? Dialogue, what someone pictured in their head, etc etc.

Edit: It looks it isn't real, as I expected. It's just like Blair Witch Project or Paranormal Activity. Thanks.

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What happened to Stavros? What happened to the deaf hitman? What happened to Lesters brother? What happened to the naked neighbor of Gus? What happened to Sam Hess' wife and children?

It's hard for me to look past those things. I really really loved everything about Fargo, but this kinda left me cold in retroperspective.

Do you think it was intentioned or they just did not have time to conclude these storylines?

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Earlier in the season we see Lou reach out to Peggy and Ed- what do you think the outcome would’ve been if they had been honest? Ed had already grounded up Rye at this point. I can’t imagine much sanctuary would’ve been given.

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Decided to binge-watch this series and was hooked from the pilot onward - the events of that episode played out like a season finale and they followed up on all that madness with nine more excellent episodes. Season 1 was a tight, tense, funny and utterly original thrillride that felt like a proper expansion of the film both in narrative and tone.

And then season 2 comes along and upends the entire structure of the first season, eschewing the singular focus on characters representing good/evil and introducing a huge and colorful ensemble cast with intersecting storylines and motivations, taking on a 70s setting with hyper-stylized visuals and production design, amping up the theatrics and comedy, and topping it off with fucking UFOs because why not. And it absolutely nails it. While I still enjoyed season 1's focused, high-stakes storytelling a bit more, I can only helplessly admire season 2 for its sheer ambition and how flawlessly it was executed. The fact that Hawley and his cast can make these two very different beasts roar with the same ferocity seriously speaks to how wide the range of their talent really is. At certain points in the season I'd occasionally lose myself in amazement that a show like this actually exists on television. I know the phrase "this feels like a movie" is overused on high-budget TV shows, but I was more amazed that this film-like visual and narrative treat is but one chapter in a much larger Fargo story. The perpetual thought at the back of my end the entire time was "wow, these guys are capable of anything."

There's about a thousand things I could point out that season 2 did exceptionally well but if I were to choose one it'd be the acting performances. Usually in a large ensemble cast, there will be certain characters that are more interesting, better-written, fun to watch, etc. than others, but here, with every episode I had to rethink which one I liked the most. In terms of entertainment, my favorite was definitely Mike Milligan - Bokeem Woodbine fucking nailed every single scene he's in and never failed to make me laugh and stay endeared and captivated by his character. But that didn't detract from the quality of any of the others. I was particularly impressed by Patrick Wilson as Lou - after a season that managed to get me invested in the likes of Lorne Malvo and Lester Nygaard, I thought that the noble origins of season 1's most wholesome character would be relatively, well, boring. He's a decent family man and proud veteran who believes in the rule of law, adheres to small-town values and doesn't have any conspicuous flaws. I didn't think such a "perfect" character could be one of the most captivating elements of the season, but Wilson carried himself with both a commanding confidence and a sense of being burdened by forces larger than himself - memories of war, the encroachment of big-city crime on his peaceful hometown, his wife's cancer, etc. He managed to earn my utmost sympathy and investment in the character, and I watched Lou with the same respect that his friends and family regard him with. The gentle warmth of his scenes with his family also made his action scenes and tense confrontations with criminals so much more thrilling to watch - he's a man of peace and dislikes violence, but is unafraid to deal it out if need be, and is more competent and committed than many others in his line of work. To put it one way, I felt safe whenever he was onscreen. Not because we know he survives into season 1, but because of that authority and professionalism that he exudes.

I understand I'm very late to the party and that none of my sentiments are particularly new to you guys, but I just needed a place to gush my appreciation and I figured it wouldn't hurt to do so here. Gonna start season 3 tonight - I've heard that it's just as good as the first two and I'm very excited.

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Curious to know your own ideas as to what Jerry's origins are, as well as what happened to him these past 30 years? If you did a modern day season or prequel season of Fargo, where might he fit into the plot again. Or simply, what do you think happened before and after to his character?

Just off the top of my head, and based on what they did with Lester's character and background in Season One of the TV series:

BEFORE: Jerry was most likely loser wimp in school who got pushed around with no respect. The season would not have him as a main character, but a background character whose family has some involvement in the main plot (not the focus here, but only trying to fit them in) - most likely as innocent bystanders. Perhaps Jerry's father was a gambler and irresponsible with money, whose wife has since left him. He's also in trouble with local thugs. Jerry meets his wife in high school and of course her father Wade does not approve of Jerry knowing his dad's reputation. Later on his dad meets with any untimely end, and everyone feels sorry for him, and Wade helps him out, and hopes to set him on a better path.

AFTER: After his arrest, we see Jerry in jail years later about to be released. Prior to this we see how Jerry has been able to survive all those years surrounded by dangerous criminals. Prior to his release Jerry is threatened and coerced by inmates with connections on the outside to do some task for them that ties into the mainplot. Scotty and his family meet him and he's welcome back into the fold, staying at their place. He is awkward as ever and all the while pretending everything is fine. He ends up dragging in the rest of his family into the whole mess.

etc

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Okay, so he might not reach the over all brutality of characters like Dr Hannibal Lectre, or Gregor Clegane, but I was initially really surprised at how brutal he was. Like I know that the movie Fargo has a lot of blood in it, but the TV show really reminded me more of No Country for Old Men.

Though some of his violence is portrayed in a comical way, there is no denying that he is really brutal - like when killing Sam Hess or the hitman.

But what makes him ultimately so special is how unique he is. He even comes across as a little bit likeable. BB Thornton brings a lot of charisma into this character and I really love him as one of the best TV villains.

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What's with the guy in Lester's insurance shop saying he works at the library, then at the start of the next episode the deaf guy saying there's no library in this town? Then the guy who lives in the town is like, "Yup, there's no library. I wish there was one." Am I missing something or was a really dumb hole in the script?

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Lol, everything he wears is perfectly fitted and super fashionable, anyone else notice this or agree?

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What is Lester's motivation for following Malvo onto the elevator? Couldn't make heads or tails out of that. And how is Malvo a dentist now? Was he a dentist BEFORE he was a hitman or did he go to school in the middle of season 1?

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I'm rewatching season 3 on Hulu right now and I'm lovin it. If anyone is interested here's a list of Thaddeus Mobley's (aka Ennis Stussy) novels:

  • Dungeon Lurk
  • Toronto Cain: Psychic Ranger
  • Organ Fish of Kleus-9
  • The Plague Monkeys
  • The Phantom Vark
  • Brittle Scotch
  • Space Elephants Never Forget
  • Planet Wyh

There was one more, but I couldn't make out the front cover.If anyone knows please share. Pretty interesting titles. I wonder if they tie in anyway to the characters and storylines of season 3.

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Any other Calgarians who are fans of the show? I love driving around town and seeing all the places where they filmed.

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So, I finished watching Season One of Fargo, and it was a really enjoyable ride.

Though I did find some things to be unexplained or rushed, this was over all a really fun and compelling Season with a great sense of style and above all amazing actor performances.

But, I didn't completely get the Riddle they were teasing and mentioning in the last two episodes. So, I get the real solution and answer of the riddle, but in which context does that stand for the characters?

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I don’t know when this happened or if I’m late but the third season is on hulu now!

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Well, i make a Game Development college, and in this semester i have to make a text game. So i was thinking about themes to make a game about, and it stroke me that Fargo may be a good theme.

The story would be original but with the form of the series, and i bet in creating a good original plot that has the same standards as the series plots.

I thought about some base stories but i was thinking if you wanted to propose or to help me writing a story for it.

And if you want to propose game mechanics and etc you're welcome too.

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Just finishing s3 and have had a good time spotting the connections between the seasons. Because the entirety of Season 2 is obvious, let's focus on S3. So far: Malvo narrator episode 4 Luverne inscribed on the bag of doggy ashes in the safe deposit box. The stamp, a man pushing a rock uphill, the Myth of Sisyphus. The deaf Hitman, season two on the ball field and season one...

What else?

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Subreddit for the FX original TV series, Fargo. Each season of Fargo stands alone - you can watch them all out of order and still able to understand what's going on. Fargo is a critically acclaimed series created by Noah Hawley, who is also the creator of FX's Legion. Fargo has won multiple Emmy Awards and Golden Globes Awards for outstanding work in television.

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