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Stickied postModerator of r/bjj

Happy Friday Everyone!

This is your weekly post to talk about whatever you like!

Tap your coach and want to brag? Have at it.

Got a dank video of animals doing BJJ? Share it here!

Need advice? Ask away.

It's Friday open mat, talk about anything.

Credit for the Friday Open Mat thread idea to /u/SweetJibbaJams!

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The Grapplers Guide: Dedicated 100% To The Improvement Of Your Grappling Performance!

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Posted by
Black Belt
12 hours ago

What up Reddit, I have been a medium time lurker and am a Reddit noob.

At the age of 15 I started in BJJ in 1995. It was Salt Lake City, UT. I was a little (140lbs) punk rock skater kid. As such, I was in back alleys, abandon pools, public parks, etc. Doing that you run into some characters. I got jumped a couple times and found myself in anxiety all the time.

Fortunately for me I saw UFC number 4 and learned about Jiu Jitsu. Back then we didn't have the internet(s), so I looked it up in the Yellow Pages. I found some dude named Pedro Sauer who had a school not too far from me. I was 15, so with the money I earned with my part time job, I would take the bus to his school and I paid for my own lessons after class, I would skateboard home.

Around that time, I visited my family in FL and while I was there I heard of a Ricksons Gracie seminar and I attended. He had two assistants his wife at the time and a brown belt.

I ended up back in SLC and was training with Pedro. I think I got my blue belt in 98... Could have been 96 or 97... I lost my original blue belt with his signature and date on it. :(

In 1999 or so I moved to SoCal. I was at a local tournament and say down to watch. I look over and that Brown Belt assistant Ricksons had was right next to me... David Kama. Rickson's 2nd American BB and one of the Dirty Dozen. I have been training with him since.

Ricksons had 2 schools. Ricksons LA and Rickson OC. He stopped coming down to OC right before I started. So we would go up and train with him at his LA academy.

Kama gave me my Purple, Brown and Black, my Professor Bars and my 1st Degree. I'm due my 2nd Degree.

Currently I teach 2 to 3 days a week at Kama Jiu Jitsu in Irvine, CA. I teach seminars internationally. I have spent MANY hours in Rickson's classes and have had privates with him. Funny enough only 1 class from Kron.

I met Aesopian before he even started Jiu Jitsu, that dude is a wealth of knowledge.

Anyway ask me anything. When I joined, I posted my interviews from Budo Videos

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Omg i just started last week. Only been to 3 classes, but I love it so much! I just want to do more and more and more and get better!!! Anyone know, are there any summer camps for 2019 where you stay for longer to learn constantly and cndition yourself?

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I am a white belt and I have spent the last few months working on and "perfecting" my armbar game. My game is based around getting to crosspoint, then full mount for the basic armbar. Or coming up with creative armbars from anywhere I can get them. (Unrelated, one time I pulled off a great armbar on a guy from his own anklelock)

But some of the guys at my dojo are getting annoyed by constantly getting subbed by the exact same submission. I've had one guy swear off rolling me entirely due to white belt hitting and my armbars.

I understand that if they dont want to be submitted by that, they should train defending it, but if I'm training to get it at the same or even faster rate then they never will get past it.

What are you dudes experiences with this sort of thing?

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Bruno Frazatto - The Complete Guard Passing Encyclopedia

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Posted by
Carlson Gracie Team
12 hours ago

Hi Everyone, I just wanted to briefly share my experience at Paulo Miyao seminar. we did a few guard retention drills that helped us get warmed up. after the drills, he showed berimbolo with some clawsome details. He gave us three different techniques in mid section of the bolo that all end up with taking the back. He then showed a 50/50 technique which I knew already but little details that I was missing. We went into sparring and I was one of lucky ones able to spar with Paulo for 6 minutes. The guy is super technical and can and will take your back in any given Meowment if you are not ready for it. A few times in my jiu jitsu career I've rolled with very technical guys that made me feel like I knew nothing. ME rolling will Paulo was definitely one of those experiences. Anyways, I have taken a few seminars before and his by far was my favorite. He has some amazing details that put my Jiu jitsu in a pawsitive direction.

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I just want to start by saying I’m not affiliated with Lachlan or Absolute MMA in any way. I’m a purple belt originally from the UK but currently living in the Middle East. I’d been following Lachlan’s YouTube channel for a while and had purchased his chokes DVD from BJJ Fanatics. Having been impressed by the detail in the DVD, which really helped me clean up my D’Arce choke, I thought it would be fun to go to Thailand and see if I could also do the same for my Butterfly/X-Guard game

My wife is also a light feather, brown belt and the fact that Livia Gluchowska would be there meant we could make it a joint training camp/holiday and she’d have a chance to actually train with someone under 85kg for a change!

// Training //

The camp ran for a week and included two sessions per day from Monday to Saturday - making it 12 sessions in total. Sunday was an open mat/travel day. The first training session would start at 09:00 and run to roughly 11:00. The second session typically began at 17:00 and ended around 19:00. Before the afternoon session on Day 1 we were all given a long sleeved Absolute MMA/Velachiraptor rash guard which was a nice touch and a good souvenir from the camp.

Day 1 PM: With our rashguards

Each session followed a similar format. First we would go through the day’s content with our partner before moving onto some specific sparring/training where we would try and practice the moves learned during the session against various levels of resistance. Then for the last 30-45min we would do open sparring for those who still had the energy! In terms of the content of the sessions, everything was structured in a logical manner with each session building on the last.

If you’ve seen his YouTube videos you know that Lachy gives clear instructions but there was always time for questions in case people were struggling. I’ve been playing butterfly/x-guard for a few years and so some of the content was familiar to me. However, there were lots of little details that tightened up my game and going through things systematically meant that I really started to think about selecting the best possible options to circumvent my opponent’s top game. In addition we went through the most common leg lock attacks (focusing on inside and outside heel hooks) from the saddle and single leg X / irimi ashi garami. This submission section was novel for me as my gym does not train with heel hooks as we are predominately focused on IBJFF Gi competition. You can see a full breakdown of each session at the bottom of this post.

There were roughly 25 people on the camp from all over the world. I’m probably missing a few places but I distinctly remember people being from the USA (Miami and California), Japan, England, Finland, Australia, India, Philippines, Qatar, China, Scotland and Estonia. There were also a range of bents from white all the way through to black and with the inclusion of Lachy and Stuart Cooper (who dropped in to film on several occasions) everyone was able to find someone on their level to roll with. There were also five women on the camp (one white belt, two purple, one brown and one black), four of whom came with their partner, so it worked out really well for my wife also. 

One thing that I especially liked was that after we had got Day 1 out of the way most people really focused on using butterfly and x-guard during sparring, which really accelerated my learning. Also everyone kept their egos in check and there was not pressure to roll with heel hooks for those (including me) who were not familiar with them.While we weren’t allowed to film Lachy doing the techniques but the guys from Absolute MMA recorded pretty much all of the camp and we were provided with the footage 2 days after the camp was over. While the sound quality was not always perfect, for me this was an invaluable resource which I will be returning to periodically when I get stuck in the future. 

// Trips/Excursions //

In the gap between morning and afternoon sessions we’d typically go on some kind of excursion as a group, although it was not compulsory. Some of the places we went to included the local Nai Harn beach, the Big Buddha and Chalong temple, nearby. In addition, we explored the local area and made use of the two free one hour sports massages included in the package. 

Then in the evening after class there were typically other excursion options available for those who didn’t want to simply fall into bed and sleep. We went to see a local Muay Thai fight (featuring a few of the fighters currently training at Absolute MMA, Thailand) and visited the night market in Patong, as well as just going out for food and drinks. In terms of weather, the rainy season in Thailand runs from May to October so while it was warm we’d typically experience one REALLY heavy shower each day, which would last for around 60-90 minutes. While this didn’t disrupt training, because everything is under cover, it stopped us from taking the boat trip that was planned as the sea was just too rough. On the flip side, the good thing about being there during the rainy season was that there were far less tourists and things were a little cheaper than during peak season (March to May).

// Venue and Accomodation //

As a venue Absolute MMA Thailand is on the site of the old Lion Muay Thai gym near Nai Harn beach, which is one of the most desirable, unspoilt beaches in Phuket. However, they have done quite a lot of reservation work and added a new weights area and a large grappling area complete with really nice, thick, roll out mats that are all taped in place so there is nowhere to slip or catch your toes. There are 10 bungalows on site, which offer basic, bare bones, accommodation but are fitted with good AC and a fridge, plus TV. There are also showers and toilets behind the gym. When we attended the camp in August 2018 it was clear that reservations to the facilities were still going on and what they’ve done so far is only a soft launch. I’m excited to see what it looks like when it is completely finished. 

In terms of accommodation, me and my wife started out in the on site bungalow accommodation. We initially chose this because we didn’t know where everyone would be staying and thought it would be nice to just roll out of bed and straight onto the mats in the morning. However, after being there for two nights we decided that the bungalows were really too small for 2 people to share when you include suit case storage etc. Also there was a rooster in the nearby field that kept waking us up at 5:30am!!! - not an issue for me who can fall asleep anywhere but for my wife it was a real problem.

When I brought this up with Joe who was organizing the camp he was very understanding and within 2 hours we were checked into the “luxury” Alphabeto resort 10min walk from the gym - which happened to also be where most of the other guests were staying.

For anyone considering these camps in the future, I’d say that the difference between the 2 star bungalows and the 5 star resort is only about $30 a night and, given that getting a good nights sleep will be essential to getting the most out of training twice day, unless you really want to keep costs to a minimum, or are planning to stay for a few months at a time, its a no brainer to upgrade. 

// Food //

With the exception of a welcome dinner and meal out on the last night as a group, food was not included on this camp. However, you can literally get food from anywhere in Thailand! The street food is generally safe and very tasty and local people cook everything fresh outside of their houses. If you avoid restaurants owned by westerners you can get a good meal for 80-100 Baht ($2-3 USD), which means you can easily get by on less than $15 a day when you add up breakfast, lunch, dinner, post training shakes and water. That being said, we ate out at one of the more upmarket restaurants on our second night in Phuket and only spent $13 each including cocktails!

// Budget //

In total I spent the following in the US Dollars:

Flights = $950
Camp + Accommodation = $1299
Food, water, post training shakes and coffee! = $155
Extra massage = $15
Extra trips/excursions = $30
Souvenirs = $75
TOTAL = $2,524

// Lessons Learned //

Some things to take into consideration if you are planning a trip like this:

  1. Bring a lot of training kit (rash guards, shorts, gis etc) as you will need to wash everything after every session because the humid climate makes it easier to contract staph or other skin infections. Spats under shorts and long sleeve rash guards are also a good idea to keep skin contact with the mats and other people to a minimum.
  2. Bring anti-bacterial soap or shower gel with you and shower within 20min of finishing training to cut down on the chances of contracting skin infections. As far as I know we had no issues on this camp but skin infections are far more prevalent in Thailand than in other less humid climates.
  3. Pick and chose how often you want to roll at the end of sessions. For the first two days I rolled every session morning and evening but by day 3 I was dead. Most people (including me) will be going from training 2-4 times a week to 12 and it’s just not possible to roll every session and survive. I picked up a minor injury on my 7th session which kept me out of sparing the rest of the camp and it’s probably partly because I was too tired to roll well that day. Next time I’ll roll only once a day at most - especially for the first few days of the camp while I’m adjusting to the higher workload.
  4. Try and practice the techniques you have used on the camp during rolling. This will help you remember what you just practiced and also give you questions to ask the instructors the next day or after class. For me it was amazing to see the improvements people were making during rolling.
  5. Go to restaurants where they cook things from fresh or with a high turnover of people. This way you will avoid eating food that may have been sitting out for a while - reducing the chances of food poisoning. Surprisingly salad is often a key thing that people get sick from (because it sits out a long time) so I’d always go for a hot meal.
  6. Take bug spray, in most humid climates the mosquitos are out in force!

// Conclusions and Thoughts //

Overall, I was really happy with the actual training side of the camp, the gym location, quality of the mats, the way we were looked after, the excursions and the post camp video footage. This was the first time I’ve been on a BJJ camp and I think it really helped accelerate both mine and my wife’s game. Compared to reports I’ve heard back from friends who have attended other camps this is on the BJJ first, holiday second end of the spectrum. For me this is exactly how it should be but if you want a more party atmosphere there are other good options such as the Globetrotters camps. However, we stayed on a few extra days to make sure we got to see everything Thailand had to offer after the camp was over and several other people moved on to Tiger Muay Thai to get even more training in!

In terms of things that could be improved, the on site bungalow accommodation still needs some work, as do the shower areas behind the gym, but that’s just a matter of finishing the renovations and a bit more capital investment. They could also find a nice retirement village for that rooster!

Real time communication was the main issue as there was not a WhatsApp/Facebook group with everyone included. I feel they could have set this up a few days before the camp started to ensure everyone could get in contact from the moment they landed. The traffic in Thailand can be bad and our pickup from the airport was about 30min late. While I was able to get hold of Joe via email it would have been great to land, turn on my phone and know what was happening. It would also have made it easier for people to quickly relay options for eating and if they were going to be late for pick ups etc while we were all there.

I know that Absolute MMA are running a women’s camp in October, which my wife is also attending, and there is talk of a Craig Jones camp in November - (not sure if the dates are right here but I found this via Google). I’m pretty tempted by the Craig Jones camp and actually think this Butterfly/X-Guard camp would be the perfect primer before that as most of the techniques we  did ended in the saddle / SLX. Maybe I’ll see you there?

// Training Outline //

Day 1

AM: basics of butterfly, single leg x and x-guard

  • Classic butterfly sweep from bottom
  • Shin on shin entry to Single Leg X (SLX)
  • Entry to x-guard and key details

PM: Butterfly - grip fighting and passing scenarios

  • Countering potential passes: pinning feet, bull fighter pass, smash pass, body lock
  • Grip fighting/counters: arm drag, double leg, front headlock.

Day 2

AM: Butterfly - dealing with single and double arm posts to the upper body

  • Single post > elevation entries to SLX
  • Double post > steering wheel sweep
  • Collar / elbow butterfly sweep options
  • 2 on 1 control to back Arm bar from butterfly

PM: Finishing the butterfly sweep

  • How to switch from over hook to under hook and hit the sweep
  • Three options to compete the sweep when the top player “floats” on your hooks

Day 3

AM: Entries to SLX from shin on shin

  • Shin on shin to SLX from various scenarios
  • Sit up guard to single leg if you lose shin on shin positioning

PM: How to counter typical defenses to shin on shin

  • Shin on shin to SLX - alternative entry
  • Dealing with the back step
  • Saddle entry from shin on shin

Day 4 

AM: Passing SLX and more counters from bottom

  • 3 ways to pass SLX 3 ways to regain SLX when opponent attempts to pass
  • Heel hook primer - outside heel hook from SLX sweep

PM: Heel hooks from saddle and SLX entries

  • Inside heel hook from saddle position
  • Inside heel hook from saddle when opponent hides the heel 
  • Outside heel hook from SLX sweep
  • Outside heel hook from SLX when opponent hides the heel

Day 5

AM: X-guard entries

  • 2 entries to X-guard from SLX 
  • X-guard sweep with adjustments for tall opponents

PM - X-guard passing and counters

  • 3 high percentage passes from x-guard
  • How to counter the x-guard passes above X-guard to banana split submission / sweep

Day 6

AM: Y-guard and Z-guard options

  • Y-guard entries from SLX or Reverse Del Dal Riva (RDLR) and sweep
  • SLX entries from Z-guard and heel hook finishes
  • Saddle entries from Z-guard and heel hook finishes

PM: Q&A 

  • Q&A on all the content covered during the week
  • Some discussion of back attack defense and other off topic areas of BJJ
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I have literally never heard a good thing about flo grappling . Is it my only choice? I want to see him submit gorilla tits

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Posted by
Alliance Black Belt alecbaulding.com
30 minutes ago
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comment
8

Hey all,

I'm wondering if this is a common thing. Context: I'm a tall guy (6'3) training for just over a year and takedowns (single or double leg) feel super awkward for me, especially against shorter guys. The best way I can describe it is I feel very exposed and vulnerable to attacks when I change levels and get in close. Just wondering if there's a better tactic when I have a reach advantage or if I should hunker down and get better/more aggressive at takedowns

Thanks for any advice!

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30 comments
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