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ArchivedStickied postModerator of r/Charcuterie

While not expressively prohibited, pictures without descriptions or recipes, and pictures of purchased foods or a board at a restaurant are discouraged, and generally down voted severely by community members. And by down voted severely, I mean into oblivion.

Pictures of platters belong in /r/foodporn

What's that mean for you? If you were about to submit that beautiful charcuterie board that you gingerly put together for your significant other on a reclaimed walnut board, with Whole Foods' finest selection of prepackaged cured meats and cheeses that you personally selected.... don't. Just please don't.

We all started somewhere. I get it. But /r/woodworking doesn't get excited for your new IKEA Bobble shelving unit. /r/homebrewing doesn't want pictures of your Sierra Nevada Pale Ale six pack. And we honestly don't want to see your board.

Unless, let's say, you made some of the meats yourself. Or have some kind of mind blowing educational story behind it.

But, that also means that the rest of the sub needs to stop clicking the shiny yellow report button. What you're looking for is the attractive blue down vote button on the left.

Thanks for your time.

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Comments are locked

Saw this in /r/smoking and couldn't pass it up. Bought two myself. At this price, the risk is negligible.

Weston 500 Watt Electric Meat Grinder

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I want some beef idea's. I did a bresola. But I want to go for a piece of beef whole flat bottom round.

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I took out my culatello today. The fiocco was done months ago and quite tasty.

Starting weight was 4400g and has lost 35% wt. It’s been at 75% rh and 55f for 8 months and hung in natural pig bladder and had a pretty decent coat of bactoferm 600.

At first trimming, the texture isn’t uniform. under the fat cap is quite squishy. Nearer the leaner exterior, the meat is firm. There was never any bad mold and it smells fine.

I’m wondering if this is normal or safe or if I can just try to rehang for longer.

Any advice would be appreciated!

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I'm buying a new house and will soon have a basement fridge (or two) all my own so as not to "contaminate" the kitchen fridge with experiments. I'm strongly considering duct taping an STC-1000 (temperature controller commonly used by home brewers) on the side of it and calling it a curing chamber or cheese cave. But temperature control only solves part of the puzzle.

Does anyone have any ideas about humidity control and air circulation/filtration that I should consider?

Am I over thinking it here?

On the one hand, "salt it, hang it, scrape the mold off and eat" it has worked for thousands of years, but on the other, if I want to make "delicious" charc instead of just "edible" charc I think there's a reason they tell you temperature and humidity ranges. Also, maybe I want to inoculate my meats and cheese with only the "good" molds and filter all incoming air. Let the chamber develop its own healthy funk and keep the rest out.

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So I’m planning to do my first bacon cure at the weekend and in what might be an ill-advised move I’ve bought Potassium Nitrate (Saltpetre) as the curing agent rather than Prague powder

This stuff: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01FXJ4P94/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

And I’ll not get a chance to buy anything different before I start curing.

I’m trying to work out how much I’m supposed to use in a dry cure for 1KG of pork belly and I’ve seen numbers vary from 0.6g – 10g (fairly certain I can discount this as that seems way too much).

Just to clarify how much do I want to be using to ensure that it cures properly sans botulism but also I don’t poison everyone who eats my bacon? (I’ve a set of digital scales so can be as accurate as needed)

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If there is anyone who has used both methods, I would love to hear if you noticed any differences in taste. Some people say that molds impart a different flavor into the meat (not sure how that's possible if the meat is encased).

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Posted by
Charcuterie Master
3 days ago
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Through a friend-of-a-friend situation, I'm going to get two wild boar legs tomorrow with the charge to make them into prosciutto-style dry hams; if I'm successful, I keep one. I'd like to make sure that happens, so if anyone here has worked with wild boar before and you know of things to look out for I'd appreciate any tips you have. Here are some details I have:

  • They've been frozen for a few months to kill off potential parasites
  • From the picture I've seen, it looks like the lower section of the leg (the "calf" for lack of a better term) was cut off, so it's just the "thigh" left
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Long time lurker, first time posting. I was wondering if anyone had tried or could find any resources for curing squirrels meats. I hear good things about the meat in general, and in theory, a primarily nut diet does well with iberico ham.

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My basement upright freezer kicked the bucket & needs to be replaced. It doesn't cool. the cooling racks go horizontal, not on the sides. Is it possible to turn it into a curing chamber? thanks

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Looking for a way to improve the bacon I make at my restaurant. It's pretty tasty but a little on the tough side. Cured for 8 days, flipping daily. Rinsed and dried overnight in cooler. Hot smoked following morning for about 7-8 hours at 225f. Sliced once chilled, baked on sheet pans. We turn about 270# worth of pork belly every week into bacon, but it can definitely be improved.

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Actually, more of an outdoor kitchen / pantry.

It will probably be about 10m2 maybe up to 15, which isn't huge, but hopefully will give space for all my process work, as well as brewing and storage of the stuff I make and grow.

Have a few ideas, but if given the chance to build a space just for our hobby, what would be essential / just plain awesome to include?

Edit... To clarify, here's what I'm thinking will be in there...

A curing fridge

Central stainless bench with drawers for tools, equipment. Also an under counter fridge for storing perishables

Spices and other consumables pantry

Trough with hot and cold water

High powered burner for brewing

Exhaust fan

Racks for storing salt, brewing grains etc

Hanging rails for chilli and garlic etc

Racks for bottled brews / finished charcuterie / preserves / cheese etc etc

A few other thoughts... Main one right now is I need more room. And I'm concerned about the heat and steam from brewing where I'll also be storing perishable things... So maybe an out door brewing station is better

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