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I worked with a woodworking friend to build a coffee table terrarium for my girlfriend. Pictures:

https://www.zaccohn.comhttps://www.reddit.com/images/tablarium/outside-open.jpg

https://www.zaccohn.comhttps://www.reddit.com/images/tablarium/outside-closed.jpg

https://www.zaccohn.comhttps://www.reddit.com/images/tablarium/inside-open.jpg

https://www.zaccohn.comhttps://www.reddit.com/images/tablarium/inside-closed.jpg

Five of the surfaces on the inside are covered with lexan/plexiglass to protect the wood that would be sitting against the moist soil. But we needed a solution to protect the inside of the lid. I don't want to use more lexan, since it would need to overlap with the glass, which wouldn't look very good.

We tried a coat of Dalys Profin Satin, but after just 2 or 3 days, the lid was already significantly warped. We opened it up and let it dry out (which took about 2 weeks), and it's finally straightened back out.

What is the best product/method to go about protecting the wood here? Obviously I'd like it to look good, but since the table is closed most of the time, it's okay if it doesn't look the best.

The wood is walnut.

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Hi

I have a brand new stornäs table and would like to darken the legs a bit. It comes with a bit of a stain and a thin matte laquer and I am looking for something i can put on top to darken down the wood. I won't bother if I need to remove the existing finish.

Thanks

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I was wondering if anyone has any advice on mixing colours to match finishes for repairs? Still learning all this and it always takes me quite long to find the right shades and colours to cover repairs and disguise them. I use pigments / universals atm.

Thank you!

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Heyo,

I built a shower structure from spruce and OSB for a small festival camp, and I want to protect it at least a little bit against dirt and rain.

Is Epoxy a good choice for that? I decided I'd coat at least the end grain with epoxy, to prevent it from soaking in moisture from rain and the ground, but I'm thinking, maybe I should just coat everything, to give it a certain robustness against dirt and rain.

What do you think? The spruce is already twisted, and it needs "persuasion" to stay in shape, so I'm worried that with rain/moisture it will not be usable after rainfall and just bend completely out of shape.

I know spruce is not the right wood for that, but it's what was available. Also, whatever I choose, it needs to dry/harden within 24hours, so oil is out.

Thanks for any insights you guys :)

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I don't have much woodworking experience but I'm aiming to restore an old ship wheel. I'm having difficulty deciding how to remove the old varnish. I spent some time sanding, but quickly relaized, given the tickness of the varnish, it's going to take quite a bit of effort to get down to the wood. There are also many little nooks that makes this method very difficult.

Looking for suggestions. Should I use a chemical remover? Should I use more than one method for different parts of the wheel?

Here are some photos for context. https://imgur.com/a/GBswt7v

Also - I need to glue and clamp much of the wheel as well. Should I do that before removing the old varnish or after?

If there's a better sub for these questions let me know!

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Hi all,

I recently oil stained a few pieces of wood (pine). While the stain was drying in my garage a bunch of dust and other particles settled onto the boards. I'm sorry if this is a rookie question, but would it be okay if I used a damp rag to wipe down the stained boards? Or would this cause some type of issue with the oil stain?

If a damp rag is a no go, any suggestions? I tried using a dry cloth but it didn't quite do the job.

thank you! Any tips are gladly accepted and appreciated!

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I’m making baseball bats that are oversized and custom engraved. I am overwhelmed at finishing options. My needs are such (in order):

Natural look Ease of use Protection

I have looked into spray lacquer, Arm-r-seal, and some other wipe on options. I want to avoid the plastic look and really accentuate the wood feel and tone. I’m using solid poplar. Thanks! Also, I’ve seen people use acid on poplar to make the wood more uniform...is that worth doing?

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I have been trying my hand at turning bits of antler into rings and have had success with the turning part of the job but not the finishing portion. I have reviewed lots of previous posts on here about how to apply ca glue and make it last but no matter what I do the ca glue seems to just flake off over time!

I'm curious to know if this would maybe be because antler isnt to absorb ca glue the same as wood, and if this is the case would there be a different type of finish anyone would recommend for finishing the antler?

Any help would be appreciated!

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I recently finished some MDF shelves with Kilz oil based primer followed by some white latex paint. I use these shelves in a safe so I’m always sliding stuff in and out of them. Is it possible to apply some paste wax over the latex paint to create a smoother/ slipperier surface? Appearance is irrelevant based on my application here. Just looking to make the surface less prone to marking when I take thing in and out. Thanks!

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I just craigslisted a small mid century desk that as a tacky, sticky top. Based on googling I think the original seal is breaking down and it probably needs to be stripped and refinished (I wiped it down with Murphy's Oil Soap twice but it is still pretty tacky). It's in otherwise pretty great condition, aside some discoloration at the bottom of 2 of the 4 legs.

My overall question is the best way to go about this. I've refinished a few wood chairs and side tables so I've gone through this before, but I really like this desk and want to do right by it. I'm pretty sure it has a veneer top but I'm not sure how thick. I was planning on stripping the top, wiping down with mineral spirits, sanding it with an electric palm sander, using a 'natural' oil stain and sealing with oil-based wipe on Polyurethane. I've tried googling for best practices but I got intimidated by talk of waxes and oils. I'm thinking of refinishing just the top this weekend and then refinish the rest of it another weekend and I'm up for all the sanding.

Is there a good strain brand to use on a teak desk? I've disliked using minwax in the past.

Should I strip it with a stripper first or go straight to sanding?

Should I not use an electric palm sander?

https://i.redd.it/w751jhem16a11.jpg

https://i.redd.it/mbtjtjem16a11.jpg

https://i.redd.it/3xdqxfem16a11.jpg

https://i.redd.it/2m3qoiem16a11.jpg

I hope this is all clear and I'm following the rules, I'm super new to reddit.

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Ok, so I'm building an arcade machine. This will play a bunch of games, anything in MAME, all of the classics, etc... it will be pretty cool.

What I envisioned is something with a very dark gray or nearly black finish. Since I can't do much in terms of art aside from some stencils, I wanted to use natural wood grain as a way to give the thing some visual appeal, and I wanted dark gray so that it doesn't just look like a table or some typical piece of furniture.

I am not an advanced wood worker, but I do play guitar and understand that guitars are often finished with dye instead of typical stain... and this seeps into the wood deeply and allows the grain to show itself off with a lot of depth. A nicely finished guitar can look just amazing. So I decided I would finish this with a black wood dye.

The wood is birch plywood, by the way.

So I have applied the dye, and to be honest with you I was thrilled with the result at that stage. Beautiful grain, shimmering patterns that look different as you change the angle you look at it from. Really cool stuff, and looks better in person than the images.

But then I started applying polyurethane to an area which will be obscured so it's a good test area, and as I added more coats, I'm worried that the finish is coming out SO DARK that I cannot see the patterns anymore. What is visible of the patterns seems to be simply the wood grain peaks and valleys catching a glare from the light hitting the glossy poly. It might just be black if not for those. The birch seemed pretty smooth to me but I didn't realize how open the pores seemed until I applied a few coats of poly.

Now I was also thinking that I wanted to try applying wood filler to get a smooth glassy finish. I did not do this on the test piece because I hadn't realized at that point this was even a thing.

So my fear is that I'll apply wood filler and then I'll be left with almost zero visible grain after the polyurethane goes on. What I was imagining though was that I could have a dark nearly (but not totally) black wood with plenty of visible grain, while having a glassy smooth finish..... instead I might just end up with a pitch black look.

Anyway, here are some pics of the dyed but unpoly'd wood, and then some of the test area which I have applied poly to. I was using 50/50 polyurethane and mineral spirits and wiping on.

https://imgur.com/a/VcAh3vf

Any suggestions on how to proceed and get a smooth glossy and glassy look, while retaining wood grain? Or is this thing just too damned dark now? And it's not like I can sand off the dye I don't think, it's probably in there deep.

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Hey Guys:

My wife took a completely untreated reclaimed coffee table and used tung oil on it twice to preserve it. It now has these blotchy shiny spots on it everywhere. We just wanted to preserve it against wine/coffee spills and now it kind of looks crap. Any tips to fix this. Keep in mind we have no experience in wood working. We did what the wood store guy recommended and didn't turn out like we expected:

Here is a pic of it:

https://imgur.com/t6R8opU

edit: Grammar fixes.

UPDATE: Thanks for all the help everyone. So I left it for a few days and most of the oil has sunk into the wood and looks way better now. We should probably not do this again right? If we do should we thin it like someone suggested below. How many times does it take to seal the table so it doesn't absorb spills etc...

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Ive stripped paint from and antique. I next tried metho to remove the shellac underneath but nothing. Im guessing its not shellac. I dont think its a stain as the paint stripper took patches off back to the original wood.

Should I try turps next? Im nothing very keen to keep hitting it with paint stripper is there something softer I can try?

What am I dealing with here these are pretty old antiques it has to be shellac im trying to remove? Help please...,

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I'm about to put together a desk, it's all laminated ready for planing and mortising, and I'm going to char the wood to finish it. I've got a couple of questions before I go any further if anyone can help.

  1. How much do I need to prep the surface beforehand? I'm going to do a pretty solid char, so I'm wondering how finished the top needs to be beforehand. Should I sand it? If so to what grit?

  2. Should I char it before doing the mortises? Or should I just get it built then char it afterwards? I figure it's going to eat in to the mortises if I do those first. Ideally I wanted the top and sides charred but not the through tenons as I thought that contrast would look quite nice. Just not sure what the right order is (obviously the tenons would get charred if I built it all first).

Can't find much about it other than how to actually char it.

Cheers.

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This is the one thing I'm just hesitant on before I start my first wood-finishing project with an IKEA Gerton table. I'd happily finish both sides, but the GERTON's underside has predrilled holes and a metal brace which will be an obstacle to making it a clean finish, never mind potential issues if I opt to wet sand the bottom.

I figured that just leaving the bottom unfinished would be the best option, but something feels wrong about that .. like I'm leaving a job unfinished.

What does anyone else think about tackling the bottom of a table top? I suppose there's also the option of just getting a butcher block off Home Depot or something so there wouldn't be any of this metal bracing or pre-drilled holes.

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