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Is it a thing? Is it good? How does it taste? I want to try it, looking for other opinions on how to integrate the two vastly different delicacies...

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In music, there is the concept a Key signature in a song. That is, for every note music theorists have worked out every not that harmonies with that key note. So say you use a D major scale, the note D, E, F♯, G, A, B, and C♯will harmonise. But other notes will be dissonant.

Is there an idea or practice with flavor pairing that works this way, like say you want garlic to be a dominant flavor, then all of these other flavors harmonize but these other flavors are dissonant?

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Hi all, Is anyone out there involved in any food related research at all? Either commercially or academically, any topic, I'd love to hear about what you're doing!

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I want to know the genus as well as how its sliced. For instance, sourdough is a type of bread, but it might come in a baguette, a roll, or sliced from a loaf.

I know rolls are all the rage. Maybe it was easier to make sandwiches traditionally with rolls? It's certainly more standard at "sandwich places" that you might find in any given city, such as Subway's, Quizno's, Which Which, etc not to mention all of the smaller delis. I'm going to go across the grain a bit and argue for the superiority of the sliced bread. The type is something I mix up, but I'm usually a sourdough or whole wheat guy.

My reasons include better texture (I would describe it as a softer bite that gets you to the interior of the sandwich faster) as well as a higher interior to bread ratio. I don't eat a sandwich to eat bread; I eat it for the insides even though the bread compliments them nicely.

I'm also into turkey/ham/tuna the most. If I venture towards a red meat sandwich, whether it's a thick roast beef or a meatball sando, that's my main exception to the above rule, and in those cases I think the ciabatta roll is superior to all comers. It has good taste, is solid enough to hold the insides but not too solid that it doesn't absorb juices, and it again doesn't take up too much room in any one bite because it's generally a bit of a thinner roll.

Thoughts?

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Doing some research into vegetarian alternatives into gelatine, beside the obvious of Agar Agar, Pectin and Irish Moss, does anyone know of any other ones?

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I tried bon appetit's recipe from this link

https://youtu.be/UGjCeAbWKPo

except using habaneros and bell peppers for volume, and it's much much tastier than I imagined. The problem is, after less than 2 weeks in the fridge, all of the heat went away and I'm left with a very tasty red garlic paste with zero heat. Capsaicin is lyposuloble, and there's no oil in this recipe. Does anybody know why this happened and how to prevent it?

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I'm a schmuck. I read magazines like Lucky Peach and pour over the menus of places like Alinea or Elbulli, but I eat broke folks food. I go to local groceries and enjoy cooking at home, I don't live paycheck to paycheck anymore. But if I go out to eat for the night I check out hole in the walls, which are a fun game of chance with hit or miss. I love tasting new things, and yet I can't justify the money on fancy schmancy joints with tasting menus. While my curiosity gets me, I can't help but think I won't be able to appreciate my meal. Let's say I have the best tea I have and will ever have for the first time. Will I be able to appreciate it's beauty? Or will I slowly recognize over time how great it was because nothing seems to compare to it? I'm curious, epicureans of this thread, what was your first experience like? Did you savor all of the flavors, or did you find something not palatable? Have you ever found everything not palatable and you just don't think you're well experienced enough to enjoy it? Or am I just nutso in this thought process?

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I've tryed to do some research about the subject, but couldn't find any relevant information so I need help to understand the problem.

A lot of articles on internet talks about the danger of soy hormonal exposure (estrogen). My friend told me that his brother used to eat a lot of soy, then his body started to react and then the doctor told him to stop all soy products. Anyone here had similar issues?

But I've also found that farm animals are feeded with hormone wich are present in our meat. Why it seems to be less a concern?

What do you think about hornone in foods?

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/r/foodtheory is designed for redditors of all skill levels to interact with one another in order to gain a better understanding of basic and complex cooking techniques, molecular gastronomy and its uses, better understanding of traditional dishes and their origin, thought processes on flavor combinations, ask a thought-provoking question that challenges our perspective on the way we view food (i.e. are truffles really more of a delicacy than a just ripe danjou pear?), etc.

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