Press J to jump to the feed. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts
9.0k

Its too hot outside !

2.0k comments
84% Upvoted
What are your thoughts? Log in or Sign uplog insign up
level 1
2.6k points · 1 month ago

I am Australian and was in London last week and it actually feels a lot hotter than the numbers say. Their buildings are built for cold so have lots of insulation and really bad ventilation. The sun was really intense and there was not much wind in the city which makes it feel hotter than it actually is.

level 2
665 points · 1 month ago

Also helps with knowing that there has been around 27 degrees Celsius in London pretty much constantly for the last week and forecast says next week will be even hotter

level 3
168 points · 1 month ago

and forecast says next week will be even hotter

I cannot live another day without air conditioning!

The paper says tomorrow's gonna be hotter.

Hotter?

Like yesterday.

Yesterday? Yesterday you said you'd call Sears.

I'll call today.

You'll call now.

...I'll call now


So what's the paper say about tomorrow?

Another scorcher!

Cool.

level 4

"Okay, I tried to call Sears but it says their number was disconnected due to non-payment."

1 more reply

level 4
12 points · 1 month ago

I hated that commercial. Perhaps he said he would do it, but what is stopping g her from calling?

level 5

I mean, I see what you're saying, but if I tell my wife I'm going to the store to get milk and then don't, and the next day she says "I thought you said you were getting milk," then it's not her fault for not taking it upon herself to do something I already said I'd do.

1 more reply

5 more replies

level 3

It’s only 79f (26c) where I’m at currently, and it’s the dead of night, but you wouldn’t know that from walking outside. 85% humidity and no wind makes it feel close to a sauna even without the sun beating down. Temperature itself is definitely not the only factor when it comes being able to withstand the heat.

I grew up in this so I’m used to it, but we regularly have soldiers from upstate faint from heat exhaustion at the nearby military base in weather I consider nice. Although, like I said, I had years to get used to it. Conversely, I’m a total whimp when it comes to the cold.

level 4
458 points · 1 month ago

Central Texan here.

Tomorrow is forecasted to be 107f with about 90 percent humidity. 9 o clock and it’s still around 90-95f outside.

level 5
128 points · 1 month ago

And you have AC everywhere. Imagine not having AC in your house.

level 6
294 points · 1 month ago

We don't have AC outside where we run our marathons though...

level 7
293 points · 1 month ago

Yeah wtf. The post is about marathons and everyone is talking about AC.

75 degrees and high humidity is about as good as you can hope for in the southeast US for a marathon.

level 8

75F is a dream. It's usually 90+ where I live and with humidity in the high 90s. Southern US.

level 9
55 points · 1 month ago

Its 75F in my house

level 10
8 points · 1 month ago

I’m looking at my ecobee right now and it tells me in large bright numbers that it’s 75 degrees in my bedroom. I feel a little cold. It’ll be 88 degrees today and I’ll be playing ultimate outside.

I guess it doesn’t take long to set one’s zero, as it were.

3 more replies

1 more reply

22 more replies

10 more replies

level 6
118 points · 1 month ago

Damn Americans and their AC. If only there was a way to replicate this technology for the world to use

11 more replies

level 6

Yeah, this makes a huge difference. I lived in the US for years and years and managed fine because there was AC everywhere. If not in my house, I could go to the grocery store or the mall or the cinema and feel a delightful arctic chill.

Now I live in southern Germany. It's not as hot but they're allergic to AC. It isn't ANYWHERE. I'm pregnant and fucking miserable.

And even here the houses have several adaptations, like the heavy metal shutters on the outside of the house that we can roll down on hot days to keep the worst of the heat out. When I visited my family in the UK a couple weeks ago, the house just clung to every bit of the heat even on the odd cooler day.

And that's the crux of it, really. Before you go calling someone a baby for reacting to the weather, ask yourself if they live in a place that's as well equipped for it as yours. Same goes for people in snowy regions laughing at places that shut down in a couple of inches. It's all well and good when you've got a massive army of snowplows ready to go.

That said, I'd kill for some low to mid seventies in the next couple of weeks...

level 7

You guys realize that when it's 110 outside and it is here your AC can't do better in most houses that 77 - 79? Ever live off the coast near Houston or San Antonio? I played outside all day with high humidity and 95+ temps. But that's not what matters here. It is more about what you get acclimated to. I think 20 degrees is really cold. That's laughable everywhere else.

3 more replies

level 7
32 points · 1 month ago

Totally understand this sentiment. I’m from Canada, used to it being well into the minuses (Celsius) in winter. I’ve been living in New Zealand for the last few years and it’s winter now with average temps of around 10-12 Celsius and I’m so cold. New Zealand doesn’t really do insulation, central heating, or double glazed windows and it’s a different kind of cold. (That said, when I’m outdoors in the daytime it’s lovely and can’t believe this is actually “winter”).

level 8

I'd rather adapt to cold than heat any day, though ideally not that much cold!

level 7
28 points · 1 month ago

79 degrees is nothing even without ac. Dont care how you spin it.

4 more replies

27 more replies

43 more replies

42 more replies

level 4

It's going to be 47°c where I live this week.

8 more replies

41 more replies

37 more replies

level 2

THANKYOU.gif

level 2
262 points · 1 month ago

Don’t forget, people who say ‘it’s way hotter where I live’ have air conditioning or ceiling fans in their house. We have none of that in the uk.

level 3

Yeah I live in Florida, I keep my house at 73°F and I'm weird for that. Most people I know keep it at 78-80°F.... We do have air conditioning, but we keep it at the temp they are complaining about.

level 4

I keep mine at 70. 78-80 is just too hot. What’s the point of AC if you’re still going to sweat when you start moving around?

3 more replies

4 more replies

level 3

Not always. Australian houses aren't usually built for heat or cold. It's like they just slap some bricks down and put a roof on for some shade against the sun and rain and assume that the homeowners will place some fans/heaters around or something. The house I grew up in was hotter inside than outside during summer and colder inside than outside during winter.

level 4

This! So many people making out that Brits are the only ones without ceiling fans and air conditioning.

5 more replies

6 more replies

level 3

CLose the windows during day and cover the windows.

2 more replies

level 3

No, they don't all have Ac or ceiling fans but I get that a lot would. We live in Melbourne with neither of the above and summer is hard. But 23,or even 33 is not that bad.

However, all other things aside, if you're not use to warm weather and sunshine then this would be a shock to the system. I spent a summer in and around the UK and it was not very summery. So it stands to reason that most people there aren't coping with the heat. And that's ok. It's not a pissing contest about who can handle hotter weather.

Back to the article. A Scottish runner collapsed at the recent commonwealth games. It was 28 degrees and sunny. The Sunshine can make a big difference when it comes to apparent temperature. 23 in the sun, when you're not use to it, while running a marathon would be hard. I just did a half marathon and it was 13 degrees and I was right at my limit. It's hard! perhaps some people who are laughing have never run many long distance races.

level 3

have air conditioning or ceiling fans in their house

And no concept of how humidity factors in.

level 4

I work ten hours a day in an un air conditioned warehouse in south Louisiana. Temps have been in the high 90s (97, 98) with, I shit you not, 100% humidity. The heat indices are upwards of 115 degrees. Sweat doesn’t work at that point. Instead of cooling you off it just makes you wet and sticky.

Trust me, we have a concept of how humidity works.

3 more replies

level 4

Live in upper portion of bible belt in southern america and work inside of a factory with hardly any ventilation, yeah last week it was 91f with 90% humidity, talk about miserable conditions.

level 5

You could be a heat guy crawling through an insulated attic to fix an AC in that weather... sounds fun! Im surprised more heat guys and electricians don't die of heat stroke.

4 more replies

3 more replies

level 4

I'm from the American South.

Please lecture me about humidity.

level 5
59 points · 1 month ago

Exactly. This “75 degree but oh the humidity!” is some bullshit.

1 more reply

level 5

Midwest here. We have 'corn sweat' (evapotranspiration) contributing to humidity. On really hot days, you can hear it.

2 more replies

level 5
31 points · 1 month ago

Exactly. Please tell me how bad that humidity is in 73f

level 6
50 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

Seriously. Humidity in the 70s feels like fluffly clouds are pampering you.

The US South is like "HEY KID, WANNA DO FOOTBALL (US) PRACTICE FOR HOURS IN OVER 100 DEGREE WEATHER IN NEAR 100% HUMIDITY?????"

Britbongers are babbies.

EDIT: WORD

3 more replies

2 more replies

level 4

You realize that much of the US gets above 90 with near-90% humidity, right?

Also, AC has nothing to do with this post, as it's talking about outdoor marathons.

35 more replies

49 more replies

level 2
Comment deleted1 month ago
level 3

That was my first thought. Why are we talking about air conditioning? What does that have to do with anything here? Our air conditioners don't change the temperature or humidity outside.

5 more replies

level 3

Right? I live in Georgia and have to be outside for work a lot. I sure wish it was 74 degrees but it won’t be till November.

1 more reply

level 2
74 points · 1 month ago

I am in Texas. It was 111 today. (44C if you are the rest of the world.)

level 3

107 in TYLER TX today, it’s so hot the crackheads are putting the copper back in the air conditioners

level 4

That's hilarious. I'm stealing it.

level 5

Just like a crackhead.

2 more replies

1 more reply

level 3
21 points · 1 month ago

Was in Texas a bit ago and endured a 107F (feels like 115) with 50+ humidity...i was smert and decided that was my touring day... In reality it was my melting day.

41 more replies

level 2
26 points · 1 month ago

marathon

inside

Oof, I wish it were 85 where I live, it's constantly >100 and humid as fuck

level 3

100 plus in humidity is a reason to live somewhere else.

level 4

Amen to that.. Too cold? no heat? build a fire! Too hot? No AC? Move to where it's cold.

1 more reply

1 more reply

level 2
23 points · 1 month ago

To everyone who's like "you don't know heat", where I live has 40°C+ for the entire of January so I do know heat. Just saying it's hotter than it sounds to us who live in really hot places

level 3

A shitload of semi-agressive r/gatekeeping going on here

3 more replies

104 more replies

level 1
353 points · 1 month ago

I don’t get the technicalities behind it, but I understand what the non-Brit’s are saying in the comments.

Whether it’s because we usually have temperatures of ~5-10C, or whether the the heat feels hotter than it actually is, I don’t know, but to me, as a fellow Brit, the heat thus far this summer has been unbearable.

level 2
189 points · 1 month ago

It's defo all about what you're used to.

I live in Asia and currently it's been about 30+ plus for weeks with ridiculous humidity.

I can't wear my hair down, I can't walk in it for more than 15 mins and I would love, love love a cool breeze. A real breeze, not air con.

My friend who grew up in Florida...well, she was wearing jeans yesterday. And she always has her hair down. Mental.

But come winter - or even like September onwards, she's got the heating on so her place is toasty, but I am one of those 'put an extra blanket on people' and won't turn the heating on properly til at least December.

level 3
57 points · 1 month ago

The post is old. It's currently 30 - 32 in London every day and has been for about 6 weeks.

level 4

Ok that’s hot

10 more replies

3 more replies

level 3
5 points · 1 month ago

Florida trains you to live in a sauna

2 more replies

9 more replies

16 more replies

level 1

And of course when our Aussie relatives visit us they spend they whole time whining about how cold it is and wrapping up like little old ladies in layers of warm clothes while we run around in t shirts.

It’s what you’re used to that determines how you deal with it

level 2

Don't be silly. When someone is struggling with something you're used to, the only sensible choice is to mock them relentlessly. There's just no way the shoe will ever be on the other foot.

2 more replies

5 more replies

level 1

ITT: people post "lol that's not even hot" a million different times.

level 2
104 points · 1 month ago

Lol that's not even hot

level 3

A million different times

level 4

.

level 3

Mans not hot

3 more replies

level 2
41 points · 1 month ago

People overheating and having health troubles is hilarious because I live somewhere hot, don't you get it!?!?

level 3

Sitting down in my armchair in my air conditioned room is a lot harder than running a marathon because it's twice as hot outside where I live!!

/s. Just in case.

2 more replies

19 more replies

level 1
358 points · 1 month ago

It’s all relative. 23c for England in April is very warm, and it’s warm to run a marathon in.

level 2
129 points · 1 month ago

You just reminded me that the London Marathon is in April.

23 degrees in April?? That's mental. Pure mental.

level 3

I ran Brighton in April 2017 and I'm pretty sure it reached 26 around midday.

People were passing out around the 20 mile mark, it was brutal.

18 more replies

2 more replies

11 more replies

level 1
123 points · 1 month ago

Is England humid?

But yeah, I've seen southerners come to northern winters and throw a fit when it hits 58. I've seen Yanks in Dixie lose their shit with the heat and humidity. So fuck it, England is cold most of the time? I can see why they'd freak about this.

level 2

Yeah it's an island surrounded by sea so it's exceptionally humid

level 2

Not usually but it has been at times. Northern England temps are usually about 16 in summer. 20 is a hot day for us. It usually rains at least a bit every day or 2, even in summer. Most of the year is 10-15 degrees. Winter it's like 5.

For 6-8 weeks now we've had 22+ daily with no breeze, at times getting up to 30. Our houses are built to retain heat, not stay cool. Air con isn't usually needed so basically no one has it. I can count on one hand the number of hours it's rained in the last month.

It's all what your used to - for us this is a heat wave and drought. Switch out someone from alaska with someone from florida and see that they would both feel uncomfortable with the new climate! It takes months to years to make those adaptations.

6 more replies

level 2

England gets like a week of sun. The rest of the year it is gray and dreary from what I hear.

level 3

We're on week 4 with no rain in the part of England I'm in. Had temps of 29c and supposedly it's going to reach 36c next week.

We don't have things like AC built into our homes because for the most part we don't need it.

level 4
32 points · 1 month ago

I refuse to keep my bedroom window open too because swarms of insects seem to invade. It's hitting 38 in London this week. Kill me.

level 5

Nothing worse than being sat behind your desk at 1am sweating your bollocks off but too afraid to open the windows because 17,000 moths and mozzies will flock to crowd your monitor, land on you and fly in your ear.

3 more replies

4 more replies

14 more replies

level 3

It hasn’t rained here for months now. It’s looks like the beginning of the apocalypse.

level 4

I was down in Essex earlier in the week and it's horrendous (well, yeah, but more so this time); I thought the drought was bad up here but there's not even a patch of living grass down there.

level 5

Cambridgeshire is 70% (ish) farmland and fields. It's all yellow and dead now, farmers are losing crops in a big way.

Fact is that England isn't built for extreme weather in any sense as we just don't get it normally.

1 more reply

2 more replies

2 more replies

level 3

We have had something like 50 days now with temps in the high 70s and no rain at all, it was murderfor the first few weeks as more than a week is unprecedented, then i think we started enjoying it. Drought broke on friday night where i am.

6 more replies

1 more reply

level 1
345 points · 1 month ago

As a brit who has spent many summers in Mediterranean tourist spots - 30c in the UK feels far hotter than 30c anywhere else I've been. Primarilly because:

  • A/C isn't widespread

  • It's a very humid heat

  • The UK is pretty crowded - the amountnof people and building and vehicles in London (for example) just ramp up thr uncomfortable level

Brits can handle a bit of heat - enough of us go on summer holidays abroad to find some...we just don't like it when it's on our own door step!

level 2
179 points · 1 month ago

To be honest I’d say “A/C isn’t widespread” is a bit of an understatement. Outside of office buildings and shopping malls it basically doesn’t exist. I’ve never known a house have A/C.

level 3

Yeah, UK houses basically never have AC.

level 4

Indeed, until I got a job in a lab (where temperature is key) I’d never even seen A/C outside of a shopping centre before

level 5

Hah, most of the labs I work in have A/C that doesn't work. One of our rooms is 25-30C all year round. Fortunately the one I spend most of my time in is at ~22C unless someone turns it off.

4 more replies

2 more replies

3 more replies

10 more replies

level 2

Definitely. Have had no problem in the med or Middle East when it’s way hotter than here but it feels completely different.

In NYC last week and everyone was bitching about the heat. It was 5 degrees hotter than London but felt ten times better. Massive breeze from the sea and long straight roads get good air flow.

People in the US forget how much a grid road system allows through flow of air. Out windy narrow streets are massive heat traps

level 3

Not to mention NY is a northern city for us. Go down to Georgia on a hot summer day and you'll see 37-39C and 99% humidity.

4 more replies

level 2

Yeaaaaaa, I'd kill for those conditions. In Florida with 95-98 degrees and 90% humidity. Work as a welder, wearing full leathers, insulated gloves, jeans, long sleeve shirt, and boots. I'm soaked through my jeans by about 830 in the morning. I've gotten pretty used to it tho.

And no ac unless I'm in my truck at work, we install large ac systems for schools and hospitals and government buildings.

1 more reply

23 more replies

level 1
34 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

23C in London must have been a cool day for this year. We’ve been getting nearly 30C for months.

And yes we’re pansies. This is unnaturally hot for England. It should be raining, but it’s not. Instead there’s a mysterious ball of fire in the sky that’s making us sweat and it’s like a nightmare.

level 2
8 points · 1 month ago

That was April ...

4 more replies

10 more replies

level 1
196 points · 1 month ago

But this about running a marathon. Most marathons take place at the end of april / start of may when the weather is cooler and preferably below 20 degrees celsius.

level 2

Yeah, but a lot of people who have never even run a 5k want to comment about how londoners are pansies because they passed out while RUNNING A MARATHON by comparing their July temps. Get outta here with your facts and information.

level 3

Ahh, but, ONE marathon vs a FIVE k. Basic maths shows us that one is smaller than five!!

I don't know where I'm going with this...

level 4

You tried, I can respect that.

2 more replies

level 2
12 points · 1 month ago

The White Rock Marathon in Dallas is in December and Austin Marathon in February, so that they are usually lower than 24C/75F. If they were around the end of April, they'd be pushing 27-29C/80-85F a few hours into the race.

2 more replies

13 more replies

level 1
356 points · 1 month ago

Judges in Southern

level 2
167 points · 1 month ago

It's been 85% humidity and 90°f in Georgia for week straight... and this is just practice for August.

level 3
108 points · 1 month ago

I’m from Florida, you can see the humidity in the air. I just came back from Vermont and I thought it was nice out, everyone kept talking about how hot it is and later I found out there was a heat wave, the temperatures were 96+ degrees all week. It was dry though so I thought it was great. Anyone who says it’s 100+ degrees somewhere doesn’t realize how much humidity factors into it. Would take 110 degrees and 50% humidity over 89 degrees in 90% humidity any day. High humidity means you can’t get away from the heat. Day and night sun and shade it’s always hot. At least when the humidity is low you can go in the shade and your heat regulation works correctly. In high humidity you over heat, your sweat doesn’t evaporate it just sticks to you, you don’t lower your body temp and you smell like shit. Don’t tell me the temp in your area tell me the humidity, that’s what will impress me.

level 4

It's the same in the winter. -40c is a regular occurrence in Alberta. It's dry though, bundle up and you stay warm. -20c in Nova Scotia is bone chilling because the humidity cuts right through the layers.

level 5

I've been trying to explain this to people for years and a good amount don't understand it. I can be shoveling snow in a dry cold and want to be ripping off my layers; you introduce moisture and I'm chilled to the bone. I've gone from being freezing shivering cold in 25F wet cold all bundled up to sweating my ass off in -20F dry cold after a flight.

When you sweat in the cold in high humidity, it doesn't go anywhere (osmosis is a bitch). You just slowly get wet from both inner and outer layers and gore-tex doesn't help at all because of that.

level 5

Definitely. Manitoba is the same. The winters there are painful after living in Alberta for so long. I mean genuinely painful.

5 more replies

level 4

Boi I'm from Phoenix. Dry heat or not 115 is so fucking unbearable it's not even funny. I've been in 80-90% humidity and 90f and it's not close to 115 with a breeze. It like a wave of radioactive hell fire blows all over you. Also it hit 120 some times. Literally you can't go out side. Also it's like 4-5 months of that bs.

16 more replies

level 4
23 points · 1 month ago

Key west baby! Always at 100 percent humidity, most days are an ozone layer warning. Today was 93 real temp, 110 feel temp.

level 5
10 points · 1 month ago

It literally got to 108 degrees where I live in Texas today...

27 more replies

level 4
6 points · 1 month ago

Would take 110 degrees and 50% humidity over 89 degrees in 90% humidity any day.

Here is a handy chart.

You see, the thing is, when temperatures rise, humidity tends to burn off.

89 degrees in 90% humidity would be bad. That's a heat index of nearly 120. Not impossible, just not normal.

When temperatures start to move above 90 degrees it's very difficult for the humidity to stay above 60% in any circumstance.

Don’t tell me the temp in your area tell me the humidity, that’s what will impress me.

4 more replies

7 more replies

level 3

106 with 75% humidity in Oklahoma yesterday

level 4

108 in texas fml

level 5

16 Celsius in Canada. All our igloos melted.

2 more replies

level 5

Luckily it's been so hot for so long in DFW that even the humidity said "fuck it" and dipped.

level 6
8 points · 1 month ago

Yep. So hot the heat index doesn't make a difference anymore.

3 more replies

level 5

They’d probably all die in Texas as soon as they stepped outside

level 6
10 points · 1 month ago

I’ve heard it called civil war weather, because it kills yankees.

1 more reply

2 more replies

level 4

Yeah it's hot here. Visited South Carolina end of June and it was hot. The humidity is where the true difference is. Here in OK, except for these bullshit rainy days that raise the humidity, you can escape the heat in the shade or with a fan.

When it's humid, there is no relief.

4 more replies

19 more replies

17 more replies

level 1
375 points · 1 month ago

Surely this isn’t real. We were just outside talking about how we can’t wait for the temps to drop into the 80s next week.

level 2
226 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

It's isn't real. The marathon didn't see anything special in terms of drop outs or deaths.

There was a bit of concern before the race that it was going to be hotter than normal, but mostly because people often take advantage of the normally cool weather to run in fancy dress. Nobody was saying 23 degrees is terribly hot, or too hot to run a marathon in, but it might be too hot to run a marathon in full fire fighting gear or 6 inches of fur. 23 degrees isn't even hot for the UK.

This is just the Aussies taking the piss.

level 3

Also, the marathon was in April so that's an unusually hot April. That's more the news than anything else

level 3

Is Seven News being the shitty news station that it is.

11 more replies

level 2
12 points · 1 month ago

It's not real. While we are not accustomed to extreme temperatures like other countries are we won't be dropping like flies at 23 degrees. Anything over 30 would be considered "scorching" though.

level 2
106 points · 1 month ago

This temp is what I set my AC at night to cool off. Normally I have it at 78f (25.5c) during the day

43 more replies

level 2

Your body really does adapt to the local climate, and takes about 2 weeks to adjust to a new one. I looked it up once and found actual Science (tm).

I've gone from our normal ice cold winter rain to a vacation down south, and 25c is unbearably hot, like it's impossible to move. Meanwhile locals are in jeans because it's chilly for them.

level 3

My body or head has not adapted since May when this heatwave started in Sweden.

Having 27-31c 24/7 in my apartment and like 26-31c every day outside.

Maybe because this heat is not normal in Sweden during the summers, I feel ill, stomach pains, headpains, feels like I'm hungover all day.

It also has rained like 1 day in almost 3 months, and we got around 40 forest fires going atm that they cannot put out.

I just wish I bought that portable AC in May, I never knew this summer would be the hottest in Sweden in over 260years. Now they are all sold out lol.

level 4
7 points · 1 month ago

I feel ill, stomach pains, headpains, feels like I'm hungover all day.

This really sounds like dehydration. Drink more water?

level 4
4 points · 1 month ago

Maybe because this heat is not normal in Sweden during the summers, I feel ill, stomach pains, headpains, feels like I'm hungover all day.

I feel much slower in the heat, like it is harder to concentrate, so I get that part, but the rest of what you said sounds like you're dehydrated! You need to be drinking a lot more water in weather like that. The headaches and feeling ill sounds very suspiciously like dehydration.

I hear stories about Scandinavians not drinking enough water and drinking tons of coffee, and that will not replace it. In fact, if what my doctor said is correct it will be doing the opposite and you should be drinking extra water if you drink coffee. Don't try to hydrate with tea or coffee or anything else - drink actual water and drink lots of it. You should be drinking 2 liters a day normally, more so if you exercise a lot or are in the heat.

1 more reply

level 3
7 points · 1 month ago

I experience it every season in Oregon. During the winter I'm pretty comfortable without a jacket if it's above 50F, after a couple weeks of the summer when it's 90-105F I feel cold if it dips below 68F. Regardless of the season I like it cold when I'm sleeping, can't really sleep if I'm not covered with at least a sheet so I try to keep it at 65 or below.

7 more replies

level 2

This is from April, not now. Yes, 73 in April is warm for people who trained in 40 degree weather for the months prior. You can run in hot weather but you’ll add to your time drastically and risk injury.

1 more reply

level 2

When you're used to the average temperature being between 10-18°C, you struggle when it's hotter.

People in places like Australia laugh when we Brits struggle in heatwaves, but we do fairly well in cold temperatures you guys would freeze to death at.

1 more reply

10 more replies

level 1

/r/gatekeeping up in here

level 2

Nothing gets people trying to one up each other faster than comparing their own the weather to another climate, wisdom teeth removal tales, or stories about turbulence during airplane flights.

level 3

Or how many bones they've broken/injuries they've had.

1 more reply

2 more replies

1 more reply

level 1
92 points · 1 month ago

Aussies must’ve had a good laugh at that.

level 2

Even as a New Zealander I laugh at this, it's pretty standard summer weather where I live.

level 3
20 points · 1 month ago

Well, for example if I go to Spain for vacation I will enjoy 30 degrees in the burning sun. There will be a nice breeze and it feels good.

Here in the Netherlands when its 30 degrees, there is no wind and the air is very damp. It will feel horrible and your body can't cool at all in these conditions. So if you go for a run you can quickly catch by surpise and faint.

It is all about the moist in the air which makes a huge difference.

level 4
5 points · 1 month ago

Yes, humidity makes a huge difference.

Louisiana feels warmer at 37C with 90% humidity, than Dallas does at 42C with 40% humidity.

Where I'm from it doesn't get below 30C consistently until late November/early December.

5 more replies

1 more reply

level 3

It sounds weird but new zealand heat feels hotter. 30° in qld is pleasant. 30° in Wanganui is like hell on earth. Just like outback heat is different to coastal heat. And people in brisbane scoff at sydney citizens fainting from 38°. It all FEELS different.

1 more reply

level 3

Central Queensland here, this is pretty standard winter weather.

3 more replies

7 more replies

8 more replies

level 1
914 points · 1 month ago

the real joke here is that you still use Fahrenheit

level 2
194 points · 1 month ago

Funny how they just had to include the conversion because no one would get the post otherwise.

level 3
346 points · 1 month ago

Don't throw stones when you still weigh yourselves by them.

level 4

I'm going to pound the shit out of you ya cunt

level 5

Oh yeah? I'm gonna kilogram the shit out of you.

5 more replies

27 more replies

24 more replies

level 2

Counter joke: You guys still use “stones” as a measure of weight, absolutely barbaric.

32 more replies

level 1

Marathon runners, dude. Don't pretend this applies to you.

7 more replies

level 1

The thing is, this is really about what runners here in the UK have trained with, not how comparably high the temperatures are in the US. If all your training runs are below say 18 degrees, then running a marathon at 23 will take its toll on your body. The fact that it’s hotter in Florida really doesn’t come into play.

level 1

Boston marathon history, because New England-

1905 - 100 degrees

1907 - Occasional snow

1908 - Snowflakes and drizzle

1909 - 97 degrees

1925 - Cold wind and snowflakes

1927 - 84 degrees

1952 - 84 degrees

1961 - 39 degrees; snow squalls

1967 - Snow squalls

1961 - 39 degrees; snow squalls

1967 - Snow squalls

1970 - 38 degrees; driving rain and sleet

1976- 96 degrees

level 2
27 points · 1 month ago

When it’s May 1 and the hottest day of the year was in February

3 more replies

level 1

I ran this marathon. I went at a very 'easy' pace for me (3:45) and still found it hard going. I had friends who are capable of 2:20 marathons running who DNF'd because of the conditions.

23° is not that hot but remember:

  • the temperature literally jumped up from 10° to 23° in a week, so no one was acclimatised.

  • The actual temperature was more like 26°/27° because of the effect of the sun on the asphalt and the lack of shade

  • The runners will have been training in temperatures between -5° to 15° for most of the winter and would have had no idea if how much slower to go / how much more fluid to take on.

level 2

Don’t forget that when you’re running your body heats up and makes it feel 20 degrees F warmer. So it felt like it was in the 90s or low 100s to the runners. That’s really hot for suck a long time.

level 2

23° is not that hot but remember:

the temperature literally jumped up from 10° to 23° in a week, so no one was acclimatised

This is probably the most important piece missing, though as another user /u/HiZukoHere posted below, the dropout rate was still in a normal range of 1-2% of the race.

2 more replies

level 1

Nobody cares what temperature your fucking country is. Most of you would probably faint running to answer the front door.

That said I would maintain running a marathon in any temperature is a foolish endeavour. I think because they gave it a name, people think they have to do it.

If someone just said let's run 26 miles, I'd tell them to fuck off so quick.

level 2

ITT people from places where you drive literally everywhere in a climate controlled box talking about how they handle heat better than people running marathons.

level 1

It's relative. We are unaccustomed to those temperatures. I'd love to see some of you guys come over here in the winter and not complain once about how cold it is.

Also, if the temperature is about 23 Celsius, you can add another 10 -15 to that in London where the buildings radiate the heat and no breeze gets through.

1 more reply

level 1
13 points · 1 month ago

Everything’s relative. It’s actually been closer to 28 degrees every day for the last week, and England isn’t built for this weather at all, while places like America etc. Have AC in every building, so we’re just not prepared for it to be a little bit hot.

level 1

For context; this is a standard 'make fun of the poms' headline, not to be taken too seriously. Happens every time it gets a little warm and the English start whinging. Straya get all like 'ill show you fucken warm cunt'.

level 1

.. most of us European doesn’t have AC,.. not in the north. No need for it.

1 more reply

level 1

This kinda misses the point, this year had been unseasonably cold up until the week before the marathon - we'd had snow and ice a couple of weeks before to the point the UK pretty much shut down (I've never seen snow in April in my whole life).

I ran the marathon and the previous hottest run I'd done since October was 14° most had been much lower (sub-zero to 10°)

It was also much hotter on most of the course as the official temp is recorded at St James Park near the river. It was around 28° at Canary wharf with no breeze at all. I saw so many people collapse it was horrendous.

level 1

Everyone going 'bleh bleh bleh try living in hot place here' needs to remember London looked like this literally 6 weeks earlier - show me any of those humid places that get weather like that. it's the rapid and severe variability that's the problem not the extremes themselves.

1 more reply

level 1

Rest of world: “haha look at Brits unable to cope in the heat” turns air conditioning up to maximum

1 more reply

level 1

Tbh the heat is unbearable because it’s humid af. Where I come from in Iran, it reaches 48-50 degrees Celsius and dry but doesn’t feel as hot as London has this past month.

level 1

yeah take the piss all you want but people in warmer countries have like mass panic with an inch of snow

level 1
119 points · 1 month ago

knock knock this is Florida. We’d like a word

level 2

Arizona here. Do you dare?

level 3
86 points · 1 month ago

Sure you guys get higher temp numbers. After all Arizona is mostly desert. But as a Floridian, I have to defend our swamp ass climate.

The dry heat you experience is different from our moist atmospher. Down here, it's like you're just covered in heat. The air itself is trying to drown you, and the fact that it's been heated to a balmy 90+ degrees just means you are slowly overheating yourself with every breath you draw. The Arizona air just isn't as dense as ours. You guys sweat and it evaporates almost immediately. Down hear, the sweat just drenches you until the salty fluid rolls into your eyes and blinds you temporarily. Seriously guys; Florida weather is no joke.

level 4

As a Texan working in Florida temporarily... You are horribly correct. Miami is the devils Gooch.

level 5

As a Miamian working in Corpus, TX... it’s literally Miami’s humidity plus the Texas heat... 100+ daily with the steam feature set to 11.

level 6
7 points · 1 month ago

One of my university professors once described walking outside from Houston Hobby airport like "walking into a dog's mouth".

5 more replies

level 5

Miami isn't bad. I grew up there before ending up in Central Florida. Orlando and north towards Gainesville is pure swamp. Higher humidity, no wind.

level 6

I live in Kissimmee. My dogs will drag me to there pooping spot and immediately drag me back inside. They want nothing to do with it lol.

level 6

As someone who frequently travels around Florida for work on boats, all I have to say is: fuck this entire state and its shitty weather.

1 more reply

level 4

South Louisiana here... can confirm, sweat rolling down forehead into eyes.

I love taking trips to the north and out to the more arid states. Step out in 90 degree heat but it feels comfortable because I am not marinading in my own sweaty boxers all day.

level 4

You lost me at moist

level 5

That’s when I really leaned in.

level 4

I do agree that 90% of the time swamp ass heat is much worse (lived in Arizona for a few years, now been to South Carolina and South Georgia for this summer) but when the temperature is up around 120+ degrees, the air dries out your lungs and it feels like you are thirsty but can't quench it, and if the wind blows, you might as well be sitting in front of a blast furnace, And it's even better when it rains the night before and now it's 120 with 80% humidity until it dries up the next day... Not arguing, as I absolutely would love to go back to the dry heat, but both are shitty in their own way.

level 5

Grew up in Texas now live in Arizona, they both equally suck in the summer. Fuck 100% humidity and fuck 120 degree weather

level 6

Let’s all just agree that Londoner’s are weak.

2 more replies

level 4

It's monsoon season right now, a lot more humid than you think. I'm new transplant from the east coast & did not expect this wet blanket.

level 4

Southeast Texas is like this. 5 minutes outside and you're soaked. But, we do get a little breeze off the gulf. Austin does not, hot as balls

1 more reply

level 4

You guys sweat and it evaporates almost immediately.

It evaporates so fast that you don't even realize you're sweating. Then you get disoriented and die. Happens every year in the winter when the snowbirds start doing "hikes".

18 more replies

level 3

Kuwait here. Do you dare?

level 4

mars here. do you dare ?

level 5

Listen here, Sun speaking... wtf are you kids on about?

5 more replies

1 more reply

1 more reply

25 more replies

40 more replies

level 1
12 points · 1 month ago

The same water that hardens an egg softens a carrot... it all depends on circumstances and what you’re used to. The amount of gatekeeping here is ridiculous. No one cares that you live in Texas and it’s hot— I didn’t know you were running a marathon in 115* weather (which is how it probably feels like for those the article)

In England its cloudy and shitty all the time, they’re not used to it. Get over yourselves

level 1

Trust me if you were running in London in this weather you would not be laughing

4 more replies

level 1

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-43850037

Sadly this is almost true. English folk aren't built for those temperatures if they aren't acclimated. The heat wave has continued only breaking for a few hours of rain. We have seen over 30°C in many places. After the many weeks it's not that bad now though

level 1

As per usual seeing posts in this thread boasting about how much hotter it is where they are and/or calling these people wimps.

You do understand acclimatisation right? You might be used to the hot temperatures but people from colder climes are not. Put these people where you ate for a year and they will be just as used to it as you.

Added to that this is clearly very selective titling and reporting. For one they will be too hot from running and second the dropping like flies will be a big exaggeration to pull in views and to make Australians think good about themselves.

1 more reply

level 1

ITT: people who haven’t run marathons

level 1

The dick measuring in this thread is insane. Wow, you live in a hot place - take a medal

1 more reply

level 1

So much farenheit talk. Literally the rest of the world didn't need the conversion.

4 more replies

level 1

the UK's not supposed to be this glorious! mans not hot? mans fuckin roasting. just remembrr we have a savage immigration policy when your countries become inhabitable in this sweaty hell.

level 1

As a UK citizen. It's been lovely, not too hot at all! Warmer than usual for this time of year, but I wouldn't think it too hot till we hit 28-30ish.

5 more replies

level 1

This may have been a top factor in why we won the revolution

level 2

That, and the well trained militia fighting on home turf with wealthy leaders and foreign funding challenging an empire in major debt on the back end of what was basically a world war.

1 more reply

10 more replies

level 1
9 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

Yes but you have to remember we are not used to this temperature. It’s not just that it’s hot, it’s this whole humidity thing. AC isn’t something that is common other than maybe at work. Sweden have some serious fires all around the country right now. And it’s going to get even hotter next week. It’s a serious situation.

level 1

That's a nice day

level 1

I like how OP pointed out how much that is in Fahrenheit so that Americans can laugh at brits. But then you realise Americans use the imperial system meaning they already get laughed at by the whole world.

level 1

If you are a distance runner (I.e. marathoner), where it is all about staying hydrated, 23C is, indeed, seriously hot. Yes, yes, many races have been run in much hotter temps (don’t remind me about about Boston in 2012) but 23C will have some people collapsing.

level 2

ITT: lots of people who have never run a 5k let alone a marathon forgetting this was back in April too.

1 more reply

26 more replies

level 1

If I remember correctly it took my body 2 weeks to adapt to the cold weather at Europe.... me being from a place where temperature always hits 33-36 degrees Celsius, 18 degrees Celsius in London was really really cold for me.

I believe their body may have not adapted to the hot weather.

level 1

Til people don't understand weather or the English climate.

Also look at the link below. You'll see how this was a freak wave hence the lack of being able to cope. Marathon was on the 22nd.

https://m.accuweather.com/en/gb/london/ec4a-2/april-weather/328328

658 more replies

Community Details

20.5m

Subscribers

99.1k

Online

Welcome to r/Funny: reddit's largest humour depository

Create Post
r/funny Rules
1.
All posts must make an attempt at humor.
2.
No posts to communicate with another redditor
3.
No Reposts
4.
No politics
5.
No pictures of just text
6.
No personal information.
7.
No gore or porn (includes sexually graphic images)
8.
Do not rehost or hotlink webcomics
9.
No SMS or Social Media Content (including Reddit)
10.
No memes, DAE, reaction, MRW, HIFW, "Me IRL", etc.
Cookies help us deliver our Services. By using our Services or clicking I agree, you agree to our use of cookies. Learn More.