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At the risk of sounding like I take hot sauce way too seriously, here are my impressions.

 

Off the bat, I don't know what it is, but it tastes better than most high POP (percentage of peppers) sauces. I'm assuming there's some behind the scenes magic happening with how the peppers were cooked or fermented, but there's some real funk, a sourness that you don't really get from adding vinegar straight. I'm guessing it's from a fermentation brine. Weird reaper taste is well negated the 7 pots flavor is more brought forward. The sundried tomatoes are everything HellFire learned from their Pure Hell sauce but stuffed into an even more ambitious POP sauce. For those who haven't had it, it's absolutely delicious.

 

What really makes the sauce though is the fact it's unapologetically chunky. I don't think it would stand out with a smoother consistency. With a sauce this hot, normally I'll spread it around a bit but since it stays chunky out the bottle (instead of spreading) I find that I eat it differently. The fact it doesn't spread out actually helps with the tasting during eating, like little flavor bombs. The flavor in this type of high POP sauce will typically be either very true to the peppers themselves (pex peppers, demon reaper) or relatively delicate (exhorresco, devorandum) and keeping the sauce chunky like this gives you the chance to appreciate that in a way that thinner sauces don't really.

 

It's a separate thing from whatever I put it on, instead of combining the flavors. And the chunks are big enough that you'll get a bite that's mostly one pepper or another, typically carried by the sun dried tomato skin which is really pretty cool. I'm assuming this effect is from the different seeds present. Writing this, I doubted myself but after four more meals with it the effect is pretty consistent. The other peppers are still there, but you wind up with big chunks of one pepper. Not saying it couldn't be confirmation bias, but it doesn't seem like to me. I feel like the effect will be there for anybody paying close enough attention.

 

Because of the chunkiness, instead of it being all over the place, it's there when you want it, like a polite guest on the plate. Fiery fool isn't the main actor, but when I have a bite with some of it, it's distinct and the flavor is well defined. Because it holds it's own, it pairs with just about anything. It's goes from 'this needs some hot sauce' to 'I'll have some hot sauce with this.'

 

Way I have this sauce is by putting a little on the side, scoop a little on my spoon or fork and then have whatever else, kind of how you would with applesauce and pork, or wasabi on sushi. Coupled with how much of a PITA it is to pour I can definitely see this sauce doing better in a jar with a tiny serving spoon, but I'm glad it's not, since I probably wouldn't have thought to buy it if it were.

 

Honestly, you can tell how much thought and consideration went into this hot sauce and I think the jester juggling the peppers on the label is great, really shows what the sauce is about.

 

I don't know how much of what I talked about is really actually there or was considered by HellFire, but I haven't enjoyed a hot sauce this much well, ever. It's bumped exhorresco down from my #1 favorite and I wanted to share. Typically a hot sauce will stand out in one, maybe two ways but for me Fiery fool is in a category of it's own.

 

tl;dr: Fiery fool stands out in three exceptional, compounding ways:

  1. The way the peppers are prepared and cooked really brought out the best of the peppers themselves.
  2. Brilliant utilization of a chunky consistency to create a taste that's decidedly non-homogeneous, further underlining that each pepper in the sauce holds it's own independent of the rest.
  3. Since each pepper holds it's own, the rest of the ingredients need to be able to work with each pepper while avoiding hurting their ability to work in a non-homogeneous sauce and still being present without stealing the show. Sundried tomatoes and cumin are fantastic answers to each of these requirements in turn.
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I inherited a bag of fifty of them and it’s a lot. I want to make a sauce, but something more interesting than a fresh green sauce. Any ideas?

My best idea so far is roasting them with onion tomato and garlic, then blending and straining into some salt and vinegar.

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I'm thinking of making a sauce with some tomatillos, cilantro and some lime; any other ideas?

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I like to think I’m a decent cook, but this is a territory I have never dabbled in, and no one I know personally has either, so I’m here for some advice.

Generally, what are the pros and cons of different methods of making a hot sauce? Which one do you use, and why?

I’ve got a ton of dried peppers in my freezer that I use to make chili, and I’ve got fresh serrano and habanero peppers growing on my porch. I want to experiment and try bottling some of my own hot sauce, and just need a little guidance.

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Basically title. Normally when I go to tasting events I taste two or three sauces from each vendor and move to the next. For reference I'm looking for heat at about the Marie Sharp's Belizean Heat level and I some of my fav sauces are the Humboldt Hab, Mango, BlackBerry and roasted ghost, both mago sauces, dirty Dick's, and the advark serbanero.

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so with the classic habanero one, can I get away without refrigerating it? and if I wanted to always keep it in my bag with me, what would happen?

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I'm a huge supporter of theirs and they're taking over this bar "Founders Ale House" tonight starting at 6! Seems like they'll be giving stuff away too along with making the menu

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Anyone planning on going? It's this weekend in Anaheim. I'll be there and went last year as well. Bought some food sauces from Fuego Box last year. They had a good variety of the most popular sauces. Anyone have any suggestions on what to get by the sponsor list?

http://cahotsauceexpo.com

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I've really never had anything other than Crystal or Tabasco, or some of the other more common "Mexican" sauces (Cholula, Tapatio...). I'm looking to expand my horizons, so to speak. Would you kind hot-sauce experts kindly give me a list of your top five all-time favorite hot sauces? A brief description of each would be nice, but obviously, not required. Thanks kindly!

NOTE: I hope this isn't one of those annoying questions. I looked for a FAQ and didn't see anything.

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I want something spicier, but I don't want to jump all the way to Marie Sharp's, what are some good sauces in between for me to try after El Yucateco's XXXtra hot sauce?

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My reading has led to conflicting results for some sauces. For instance, I've seen the original Dave's Insanity Sauce (a sauce which kicked my ass in the past) anywhere from 50k up to 250k. Do different measuring methods give different results? How can I compare sauces?

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I mostly use hot sauce for nachos or quesadillas, so looking for something hot that will compliment them well. I currently am obsessed with Secret Aardvark so anything with a similar heat profile would be ideal, maybe even with a little more bite!

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I’ve seen a lot of people recommend a lot of different sauces. Generally, they don’t really have any thing bad to say about most sauces. Are there any out there that are just terrible? I’d like to see this sub’s DO NOT TOUCH list.

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Yep. I’m gonna do it. After making the Pork inspired apple one, my next step will be mangos with chillies for Indian food. I’d like some goat or maybe pork to try it on, but I’ll let y’all know how it turns out.

Thank you everyone for your feedback on my previous sauce!

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