Press J to jump to the feed. Press question mark to learn the rest of the keyboard shortcuts
67

What is the best SNMP monitoring software out there?

I like Nagios.....and if you say Solarwinds I'm going to bitch slap you! PRTG is also good but cumbersome.

162 comments
81% Upvoted
What are your thoughts? Log in or Sign uplog insign up
level 1
66 points · 7 days ago

I am a fan of librenms

level 2
HEYO8 points · 7 days ago

Agreed. I ditched cacti in favor of this and haven’t looked back after installing it a year or so ago. Supports all the meraki/cisco infrastructure we have right off the bat.

level 2

I've just tested librenms and wow! It seens really robust, and yet so simple to use.

level 2

Totally agreed. I've been switching NMSs until I found LibreNMS.

Easy to install, easy to deploy, easy to manage.

I'm using it with nfsen+(influx+grafana) integrations and going to oxidized and nagios plugins.

level 3
ACI/F5/Infoblox/Openstack2 points · 7 days ago

Do you have a good website to follow? Everything I've seem to find has been out dated. This is the setup I wanted to do.

level 4

Not really. I was using influx+grafana before, so I only did: https://docs.librenms.org/#Extensions/InfluxDB/

You also have https://grafana.com/dashboards/2556 that is an Interface Dashboard for LibreNMS.

If you know how grafana works, you will be able to graph almost everything from LibreNMS.

level 2
Meow 🐈🐈Meow 🐱🐱 Meow Meow🍺🐈🐱Meow A+!4 points · 7 days ago

I'm such a fan, I contribute when I can. A++ project, A++ people involved.

level 3
2 points · 7 days ago

Thanks! :P

level 2
DRINK-IE and LINKSYS-IE6 points · 7 days ago

LibreNMS > *

level 2

Ok, I'll bite. Because I see this come up a lot. What makes librenms better than a commercial product like Solarwinds or HPNA? Just because it's open source and runs on Linux?

I feel this sub is obsessed with open source and Linux, to the point of praising inferior products. Solarwinds, like Cisco, gets a lot of hate on this sub, but it's a vastly superior product to the others (again, just like Cisco.) I'm guessing just because it's popular?

level 3
CCNP | ISP Operations2 points · 7 days ago

I feel this sub is obsessed with open source and Linux

/r/networking is definitely an interesting place. I posted a "demographics" survey a while back but only got 130 responses so I never followed up with the results because it was only a tenth of a percent of the sub. But I wanted to get a grasp of what industry people are in and what size their organizations are.

level 4

I'm 39 work for a small phone company. I'm a huge linux bigot.

level 3

Roll your own fixes, forks, better support with direct contact to the developers, no hidden license fees, no planned obsolescence with 'new releases', often targets Linux so no additional Windows license costs, no pushy sales, easier sell for the budget, no vendor lock-in, etc.

I don't mind proprietary, black box solutions but I do find them a total fucking pain in the arse to get the money signed off. Especially when they sucker punch you with a 'premium' feature that wasn't clear when you made the purchase. Paid support is also rarely useful, with many finding ways to cut off the support (oops, your network card isn't supported, so we won't progress this web interface bug).

level 3

I don't know what lib does ... But I think hpna is a completely different tool from my snmp monitor

level 3

Exposure. As someone whose career is based firmly in linux administration, and the use and support of other open source tooling (gitlab, kubernetes, docker), I often find it very perplexing how I would even expose myself to proprietary products (that are setup correctly, in an enterprise environment) without hail-marying for a job that works with it. Even moreso with enterprise hardware, the idea of having a rack in my house with enterprise switches and servers seems a bit much for my apartment and power bill.

Anyway, my point is that things like the software I mentioned above, LibreNMS included, are tangible for mere mortals and we don't have to pay a cent or sign up for some trial to get our hands dirty and learn it.

In short, I like working with things that I can use and abuse without worrying about licensing, or cost beyond the time needed to administer and learn said software.

level 3

Honestly we use solar winds where I work and we use librenms. They both do really good at their jobs. The area we use libre is simply a budget issue. There are areas that we don’t like solar winds and there are areas that we don’t like other packages. We are not a open source shop. We mix it pretty well.

level 4

What things does libre do better than SW

level 5

For one I hate the graphs of solar winds. We have been working with it at my last 4 jobs over the past 10 years and they never get better.

Another is usability of solar winds feels overly complicated to me. It might be how people before me have set it up. But still a complaint.

level 3
CCNA RHCE BCVRE1 point · 5 days ago

It's a giant pain in the ass dealing with a bunch of proprietary software and the vendors support when you have an issue. Open source stuff allows you to look under the hood and troubleshoot an issue. Last place I worked rolled their own monitoring infrastructure via Linux, Python etc and it was pretty powerful solution. We could have bug fixes and feature requests implemented within a few hours / days instead of waiting months for a vendor to prioritize something.

level 2
2 points · 7 days ago

I set up librenms for most of my customers. Works very well.

level 3

How’s it work for a very mixed environment? I’ve got Cisco, Juniper (routers and firewalls), PA, Arista, and Aruba. Just to name a few...

level 4

Yes, it supports all of those vendors. Plus many more.

level 3
Comment deleted7 days ago
level 4
5 points · 7 days ago

Kind of! I'm part of the LibreNMS team and setup a highly available and scaling LibreNMS installation for my last job. I deployed a central server in AWS with multiple front end servers load balanced by ELB (you could substitute any HA load balancer), RDS for highly available database, and an rrdcached cluster. From there, I setup remote poller clusters in our two different datacenters that used SSH tunnels to report back to the central server in AWS. It's really powerful, and scales as much as you want. I'm on my phone, but i can dig up some links later if you're interested :)

level 5
3 points · 6 days ago · edited 6 days ago

/u/brianthedoggo, /u/hatevalyum

Here is a diagram I made when setting up my LibreNMS instance: https://community.librenms.org/uploads/default/original/1X/48ad67162a686811cfcc88e4dd0ee517f7ce68d5.png

You can find the documentation for remote pollers here: https://docs.librenms.org/#Extensions/Distributed-Poller/

I used something like this to create a service managed via systemd for the ssh tunnels: https://superuser.com/a/1105956

This let me create a tunnel through an SSH server hosted in AWS (You can do this with your own network as long as it has a port accessible from the WAN): https://superuser.com/a/1105956 Basically, you tunnel through the ssh server, to the server actually hosting the services. In this case, you need a tunnel to the mysql server(s), and one to the rrdcached server(s). Their ports will then be present on your local host, so you point your remote poller at localhost:3306 and it will write to the database in your local network. Same with rrdcached. The rrdcached servers will handle multiple writes from different sources to RRDs files and the frontends only have to worry about reading them, it works very well.

As far as load balancing the front-ends, I used this guide to get the PHP instances to share their session data in a memcache: https://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-share-php-sessions-on-multiple-memcached-servers-on-ubuntu-14-04

level 5

Ditto on the links! The remote poller stuff has me scratching my head.

level 6
1 point · 6 days ago

I posted a reply with links and stuff. If you still need help, we have forums at https://community.librenms.org/. My username is the same as on reddit, and you are more than welcome to mention me with quesions, though other team members are probably more capable than I am :P

level 4

I mostly use it to monitor routers and switches, and have set it up for customers with 200+ wan locations without problems. 600-700 devices total. Only 1 VM with 16gb ram.

level 5

That's interesting. My LibreNMS box is a VM that size, and I get occasional dropouts when it does a poll. But then it's polling approx 100 devices, and many are 200-odd port switch stacks, and it's polling all of that. My plan is to scale up to two servers, one to poll one site, the other to poll all our other sites (they're much smaller) and run the front end. I'm wondering what sort of devices you're polling?

level 6
1 point · 7 days ago

See my other comment. You can scale out a single instance by adding more front ends, more remote pollers, etc to make it easier to handle lots of traffic and devices

level 7

Thanks, I'll take a look. I've built two new servers but not yet found the time to install LibreNMS on them.

level 2

librenms is great, we use it at work

level 2
2 points · 6 days ago

Is it better than opennms?

level 3
2 points · 6 days ago

I like it better

level 2

By far the best NMS IMO

level 2

librenms is an excellent system, I even managed to write an app plugin to pull the sensor data from a Homeseer device

level 2

We are also transitioning from a commercial monitoring system to LibreNMS for network devices. We still have servers in the old system but we're looking into different solutions (maybe librenms, maybe something else) to monitor the servers.

level 1

Try Check_MK. It’s Nagios on steroids

level 2

Check_mk is far from Nagios these days. The enterprise version is just insane. I was monitoring 150K+ services on a single VM (2 cores, 4 gigs). Rarely did I have to go "under the hood" to do anything.

level 2
Logs, or it didn't happen1 point · 7 days ago

This. Im just setting up another instance at the moment.

level 1

I like big stuff that promises the world, where you are harrassed daily by sales until you finally commit to purchase and then once you own it, realise that it would require months or years to properly configure to deliver on those promises and strangely it's really hard to find any support for the product from anywhere... until the license comes up for renewal.

level 2
3 points · 7 days ago

That sounds like SNMPc.

level 3

Castle Rock SNMPc? I think of that as a fairly small and simple product that does its job well. We just use it for up/down monitoring, and displaying a map of our network.

level 4

I am a fan myself. Very customizable, but does look dated nowadays.

level 5

It does not look dated, that's retro chic.

level 2

Careful, OP will bitch slap you.

level 2

So you do business with HPe and Netcracker then?

level 2

Spectrum?

level 1

AKIPS

level 2
6 points · 7 days ago

+1 for AKiPS

level 2

+1 for AKIPS. Plus even more for the "site scripting" hooks you can use to alter it's behavior. http://akips.com/showdoc/scripts

I am actually amazed more IT shops don't use it

level 2
2 points · 6 days ago

+1 for AKIPS as well. Had to jump through some hoops to get them on a purchasing approved vendor, but after the demo I was more than ok ditching Solarwinds/PTRG for it.

level 2

I am going to have to check out AKIPS we are looking for something to do flow monitoring at work and this looks great!

level 1

LibreNMS for small-medium environments. The auto-discover functionality is tops and it'll get you up and running in no time.

Zabbix is my go-to for larger environments or those where you need a high level of customisation. It doesn't frustrate me anywhere near as much as Nagios and is quite easy to work with once you understand how it operates.

level 2

+1 for zabbix

level 3
6 points · 7 days ago

Yesss Zabbix all the way +1

level 4

Zabbix is love, Zabbix is life.

level 5

+1 Zabbix. Setup was a breeze too. Well documented.

level 2
DRINK-IE and LINKSYS-IE1 point · 6 days ago

Have you had issues with LibreNMS on larger environments too?

I'm not being accusatory, I'm just curious on what you guys have seen on larger environments for LibreNMS.

level 3

I'm not being accusatory, I'm just curious on what you guys have seen on larger environments for LibreNMS.

No worries!

Have you had issues with LibreNMS on larger environments too?

I had a look at scaling it for a few large/distributed environments. Yes, it can scale, but it seemed... clunky in comparison to other products. I found it to also be quite resource hungry when monitoring large numbers of devices, and adding support for new devices is not straightforward.

Again - great for SME, or a specific use case/device type at a large environment, but there are better products out there if you need to tweak the knobs a bit more, or if you're just That Damn Big(TM).

level 1
Comment deleted7 days ago
level 2
9 points · 7 days ago

Another vote for PRTG.

There is a learning curve, and I'm not a fan of the new interface; however, for what you want it to do, which is to keep an eye on your devices, save historical data for baselines, and alert you when something goes wrong, it works fantastically.

One of the major features I like about PRTG that is missing in many other tools is that all the settings are can inherit from their parent or can be individually overridden.

I will add that, one of the pro-tips that will turn your PRTG install into an easy-to-use monitoring machine is to develop a tagging policy and follow it.

Also, even for large installs, the price is very reasonable and easy-to-understand.

level 3

I’m curious about how you use tags, I haven’t started using them yet. Care to share what kind of system you setup with them?

level 4
5 points · 7 days ago

Basically, the PRTG interface is terrible at selecting or searching for a specific group of sensors (more than 1, less than all the sensors of 1 type) because you can't reliably AND tags together. The best way to handle this is to make sure any group of sensors you'd ever think about can be defined by a type and tag.

To do this, each geographical group has the site ID and common name as tags. Each organizational group uses that org name as a tag. Each device gets tags for: vendor, model, type, purpose, and class. Then some sensors get additional tags: IPSLA gets a tag for the type of SLA, traffic sensors get 'uplink', 'trunk', 'portchannel', 'member', and/or 'gateway'.

This makes it very easy to define reports that will continue to work in the future without additional maintenance. I also use them to bookmark groups of sensors for quick status checks or maintenance.

level 5

I would also add that you can use tags to create 'sensor libraries', for which you can define unqiue alert thresholds and notifications.

level 6
1 point · 6 days ago

We just discovered this, and it is another awesome feature I need to dive into.

level 5

Hi! If I have lots and lots of sensors, all with tags. But some tags are different than others, and I want to mass change the tags, how can I do it? Is there a database where I can export the Tags and then import it back?

level 2
3 points · 7 days ago

You can do some pretty cool custom sensors with PRTG and it is not hard. Adding mib files is easy with their utility. To get started I suggest downloading all of the mib files for the hardware you want to monitor most. Paessler has made a fair monitoring solution that covers all of the basics.

level 2
CCNA / VCP-NV3 points · 7 days ago

Well, it is cumbersome in the way of required resources. Still my platform of choice though.

level 3
1 point · 7 days ago

No way near as cumbersome in resource requirements as Solarwinds, however!

level 2

I'd probably give it a spin if it wasn't Windows only, alas until then.

level 2
i know some stuff2 points · 7 days ago

Agreed. Just deployed PRTG. No complaints so far.

level 2

Have another upvote and another vote for PRTG. Fantastic product.

level 2
1 point · 7 days ago

Agreed - another vote for PRTG. Really easy to set up and get going, and 100 free sensors is great.

level 1
7 points · 7 days ago

Prometheus and Graphana are something i want to try, I can't attest to it at all. But, I thought to mention as a lot of people like using it.

level 2

Use TICK stack with Grafana instead, IMO.

level 3

Ill check it out, thanks

level 4

Look at SNMP Collector for gathering SNMP into InfluxDB I would say, much better than Telegraph’s SNMP support.

https://github.com/toni-moreno/snmpcollector/wiki

level 5

So much faster than Telegraph.

level 2
CCNP, JNCIS-ENT1 point · 7 days ago

If you have a lot of free time and you want customized boards then yes. If you want something pretty that works out of the box then no

level 1
Moderator | Infrastructure Architect9 points · 7 days ago

What are you monitoring for?
How large of an environment?
Just SNMP Graphs, or do you want Netflow, Traps & Syslog all-in-one?

level 2
Original Poster4 points · 7 days ago

Traps and netflow

level 3
Moderator | Infrastructure Architect5 points · 7 days ago

How large of an environment?

Have you looked at Akips ?

level 4
Original Poster2 points · 7 days ago

Want to capture snmp from roughly 500 devices

level 5
Moderator | Infrastructure Architect5 points · 7 days ago

Ask for an eval of Akips or StatSeeker.

It will be worth the effort.

But, there may be some free solutions such as LibreNMS that can fill your needs.

level 6

-1 StatSeeker. We we're a customer and the product stagnated. Most of their talent to build AKIPS (which is everything StatSeeker wanted to be)

level 6
0 points · 7 days ago

+1 for Statseeker.

level 1

I use Zabbix for some SNMP monitoring. I like it well enough.

level 1

We use Zabbix for centralised alerting.

For longer term stats we have collectd pushing to graphite, and have grafana for visualisation.

level 1

Zabbix!

level 1
JNCIS CCNP3 points · 7 days ago

Checkmk is like reskinned \ streamlined nagios pretty good.

level 1

LogicMonitor... cloud based with a very simple collector that can be installed on any server. Easy to customize and can do full netflow from all devices. Also can include configuration backups.

level 2

+1 for LogicMonitor. So easy. I can't believe I don't see it come more on these types of threads.

level 1
CCNA9 points · 7 days ago

Solarwinds it works well and is easy to setup and start monitoring.

Honestly I don’t think there single piece of software that does everything SW comes close with its single pane of glass but it’s very expensive.

level 2

but it’s very expensive.

And that doesn't include the cost of the showers to wash off the Solarwinds Salesperson Sleaze!

level 3

If only my phone would stop ringing... Leave me alone, Matt!!

level 3
2 points · 7 days ago · edited 7 days ago

The trick is to purchase SW through a vendor. I bought it through our primary VAR, Softchoice. The last time SW called me I told him to talk to my account manager at Softchoice and they have left me alone ever since.

level 3
Original Poster2 points · 7 days ago

That's my beef!

level 3

For real.

level 3

I swear my phone started ringing before the trial finished downloading.

level 2
CCNP7 points · 7 days ago

Solarwinds also is a hog and I don't think it's very intuitive to manage.

It does a lot but not a lot of it very well.

level 2
Associate Network Analyst/Administrator3 points · 7 days ago

We dropped solarwinds for Nagios and still monitor the same stuff (or more) for a fraction of the cost.

level 2
Moderator | Infrastructure Architect4 points · 7 days ago

Solarwinds is only suitable (IMO) for small environments.
It doesn't scale for shit compared to AKiPS or StatSeeker.

Solarwinds needs to get off of MS-SQL and onto PostgresSQL or something similarly free.

Their polling engine needs a serious tune-up.

But I will acknowledge that Solarwinds does have a very slick GUI that is customizable as hell.

level 3
It's not the network!5 points · 7 days ago

We have a consultant installing Solarwinds, and he looked at me like I was crazy when I said I wanted to monitor all the ports. Our current software (CA Spectrum) does it, so I didn't think I was asking too much. Apparently I am.

level 4
Moderator | Infrastructure Architect6 points · 7 days ago

We had a primary solarwinds server and two additional polling engines plus the dedicated MS-SQL server. All were ProLiant DL380 physicals. Best we could do was polling all switch ports every 7 minutes, and critical ports every 3 minutes.

We evaluated StatSeeker and the sales team said "Install our product on whatever your standard laptop is, and tell it to monitor all the same things your Solarwinds environment is polling."

StatSeeker polled our entire environment every 1 minute from a laptop that was also running their database server.

Solarwinds needed 4 physical servers to TRY to accomplish the same thing.

StatSeeker ran into some development strategic vision problems, and some of the core developers started a company called AKiPS.

AKiPS is solid. It's youthful, and therefore missing some polish in a few places. But it's solid.

If you want a commercial product for a larger environment, I encourage anyone to evaluate these products.

level 5
It's not the network!3 points · 7 days ago

I love AKiPS. We've had Statseeker for many years now, and it works, but their UI is garbage. Unfortunately we can't switch to AKiPS because they don't have a US distributor we can use. I think we'll eventual get there as Statseeker raises their prices allowing us to get a special exemption.

level 5
Comment deleted7 days ago
level 6
Moderator | Infrastructure Architect3 points · 7 days ago

It all depends on what your requirements are.

If you need a highly granular Netflow reporting tool, then neither StatSeeker nor AKiPS are going to make you happy.

level 7

Do you have a preferred Netflow reporting tool?

level 8
Moderator | Infrastructure Architect3 points · 7 days ago
level 8

It's totally not applicable to many people, but we pump the data from pmacct into our own CRM via a REST API that I knocked up.

level 3
CCNA1 point · 7 days ago

Thank you never heard either going to look into them as your right SW is a bit h to scale.

level 2

It’s “expensive” for small shops.

I’m monitoring a larger network for 20k a year with modules and that’s in the noise of my budget.

For the 80% it does well I find it worth it

level 1

Telegraf, InfluxDB, chronograf, and Grafana. Roll your own.

level 1
CCNP R&S, JNCIA, bad jokes+52 points · 7 days ago

What does your monitoring software need to do exactly?

level 2
Original Poster2 points · 7 days ago

Want to gather traps& netmon information

level 3
CCNP R&S, JNCIA, bad jokes+52 points · 7 days ago

You could try setting up Graylog for syslog and snmp trap logging.
LibreNMS does both I think and it faster to setup.

level 1
2 points · 6 days ago · edited 2 days ago

I was a huge fan of Zenoss (core) a couple of years ago (2012-2015ish) ... But they had a big change in the way they released and I am not sure if they stuck with it, but I MUCH preferred the old version. [they went to a horrid container architecture that made their deployment way-over complicated - it was a prime example of trying to go "micro-service" architecture simply because it was the trend of the day]

If they ended up sticking to what they were, it's a pretty awesome piece of software; Can't say for certain which way they went, though. Worth a look.

level 1
2 points · 6 days ago

Joined a corporate Microsoft shop a few years ago after living and breathing linux with Nagios for 10 years. At the end of my time with Nagios, it was actually Icinga to enjoy more frequent updates with nconf to make configuration a bit more manageable. I like to think I was pretty good with it, but now when I think about opportunities to deploy from scratch I shudder a little. Regardless, I still hold a soft spot for Icinga.

At this new site, it's 97% PRTG which makes sense given how we're primarily Windows. And hey, it does a good job of monitoring all that. I hit a lot of pain points with PRTG in both the OS and Network camps but nothing, however, tops my disappointment about not being able to do decent scheduled maintenance. You can schedule a downtime window, but it disables the sensor polling during that window as well. That means if you like to use your monitoring system to confirm it's all healthy immediately following a change, you can't do it until the window is finished or cancelled and sensors leave their paused state. At which time, alarms will go off and follow normal notification escalation. We've dabbled with auto-acknowledgement as an alternative, but that makes the uptime stats look ugly (which some people care about). I'm actually writing this in hope someone can correct me and show that there is a way to do maintenance windows without Auto-Ack or pausing of sensors.

Anyway, PRTG has reasonable overall network hardware support and a not-too-bad MIB importer for the other stuff, but after a colleague and myself independently dabbled with LibreNMS, we are convinced this is a much better option for network monitoring. Now we've got a proof of concept in place and while it does mean potentially we'll be running two monitoring systems (I am sceptical LibreNMS would fit our Windows needs), I am pretty impressed with both the out-of-the-box capability and being able to customise it. I had tried OpenNMS and Observium briefly for home use but found Observium's requirement for hosts to have SNMP inconvenient and then after discovering and comparing against LibreNMS, it was hands down a win for LibreNMS.

level 1

Depends, if you what to monitor Operating Systems, i like Grafana with InfluxDB. But for networking, you can use cacti. Always talking of free options...

level 2

Solarwinds its to expensive

level 1
BOFH2 points · 7 days ago

It really depends what you want to accomplish. Nagios is incredibly limited in a lot of ways (at least the free version; I've never tried the paid one.) It also lacks some functionality that, in 2018, I'd consider basic, like an API for management and the ability to modify configurations via the web UI. Having to edit config files is pretty meh, and more so when they're a proprietary format to begin with.

I use observium for a solid handful of stuff, and icinga2 for other stuff, and between the two of them I cover almost all of the bases I'd like to cover. Both are FOSS, and observium has a paid option as well.

level 2
1 point · 7 days ago · edited 7 days ago

Do you use SNMPTT with Icinga2, or something else? Know of any good guides on setting that up? It seems so convoluted

level 1

Sol..s..soooll...Solar Winds.

/jk

But seriously, Fuck Oracle.

level 1

Solarwinds

level 1

Icinga 2 instead of Nagios, or Observium.

level 2
1 point · 7 days ago · edited 7 days ago

Do you use SNMPTT with Icinga2, or something else? Know of any good guides on setting that up?

level 1
Comment deleted7 days ago
level 2
Original Poster1 point · 7 days ago

Thank you.

level 1

Observium, This tool puts, all the others to shame!

level 2
2 points · 7 days ago

Lol, pretty sure LibreNMS can hang

level 3

When places like VZW, Bank of America, Sprint and Apple start using that then I will believe it. Edit: meant that for both of those tools

level 4
2 points · 6 days ago

I know of one of those that do.

The annoying thing about open source is you don’t get to hear about who rolls your stuff out. Thankfully we’ve had a few engineers in $big corps let us know they do. It’s a nice pat on the back.

level 5

I see, I had not considered this. Thanks for pointing that out about the open source model

level 5

Just seems funny it even matters.. it does everything I want, but I won't use it because some big name company doesnt.

level 6
2 points · 6 days ago

Open source sometimes isn’t as rewarding as people may think it is so getting a nice warm feeling when big companies use it - or when people say thank you as well makes a world of difference (to me at least). Think of it like working on a help desk. You get rare gems where people say thanks, for the rest of the time it feels like you’re getting beat up :)

Threads like this are also nice. Definitely feeling the love in here :)

level 4

Considering LibreNMS is the most upvoted NMS in this post, I think a lot of other engineer's have already started to beleive.

level 1

I have used every single one in the list. The fortinet siem (accelops purchase) is the best snmp, netflow, logging, monitoring product out there. Takes anything yiu can send it. Extremely powerful. Get an evaluation and try it. That's all I'm saying.

level 1
A+/N+/S+/CCNA1 point · 7 days ago

how about the actual version of snmp..how many have converted to snmp v3?

level 2

We tried ... But found that the SNMPv3 engine on out aging APC UPs devices occasionally silently fails. Not fun :(

level 3
A+/N+/S+/CCNA1 point · 7 days ago

still on my list..of many lists.

level 1

NetXMS is another option, something I've used extensively. Offers decent vendor support and is highly customisable, open source, scripting, agents etc.

level 1

We used Nagios in my old job and quit before the roll-out of Solwarwinds.

level 1

WUG use to be okay but they suck horribly now, LibreNMS all the way.

level 1

While were on the topic, anyone know of any good open source Netflow monitors?

level 1

Microfocus NNMi. Nothing else handles the scale NNMi does, thats why its used in all the big telecoms and banks, huge networks.

level 2
CCNA1 point · 7 days ago

NNMi is great until it breaks. I thought HP's software support was the worst I had ever dealt with in my life, but then they sold it to Microfocus and somehow it got worse.

level 3

Premier support is decent but it costs extra

level 4
CCNA1 point · 6 days ago

So their strategy is to provide terrible support in hope that you become desperate enough to pay for their Premium support, just to get an engineer that knows what they're doing? No thanks. Frankly we're going to be taking our business elsewhere as soon as the budget allows.

I mean, I really can't emphasize enough how worthless their business level support is. My last case I spent 2 weeks waiting for them to read logs, 1 week of them repeatedly rescheduling the webex so they could help other clients, 5 hours straight on the phone watching them screw up basic Linux commands (while their coworker was whispering the commands in their ear), until they finally agreed to escalate. The tier 3 guy fixed it in 15 minutes. And this wasn't even an extreme case, in my experience, 2 week turnaround is the bare minimum with them.

Funny thing is, they haven't even tried to upsell better support to us. My boss sent our account rep a nasty letter after that last incident, asking if that is the level of support we can expect from them, and... no one ever replied. Not to mention the numerous bad surveys I've sent them after every incident. They just don't even care.

level 5

To be honest with you that sounds about par for the course

level 1

I am very happy with Zabbix. It can do very much while being pretty easy to use.

level 1

Is there a text-only CLI SNMP monitoring framework?

I'm aware of snmpget, snmpwalk, etc., not what I mean. I'm imagining an entire text-only NMS that you would access by SSHing into the server. It would collect and save stats and have a query language that you could use to filter and display. Does anything like this exist?

level 1
MSP consultant1 point · 7 days ago

We use Auvik. Commercial, but we think it is cost effective.

level 1

PRTG is what we use, quick, fair price, 100 nodes are free from the outset and its very expandable.

level 1

I wasn't a fan of LibreNMS. Seemed a bit too "out of the box" and constricted, which I suppose has its place if you want something quick to implement and get up and running.

I like Zabbix. A lot.

level 1

HP operations manager

level 1
1 point · 7 days ago

I am still a fan of PRTG - their API allows me to build fun stuff if I ever get time and it is easy to build quick dashboards with their builder thing.

level 1

We use Solarwinds for about 2000 nodes. It's a bit pricey but it is a very powerful tool.

level 1
Gnetwork Gnome1 point · 7 days ago

This may get downvoted, but depending on your situation, you could also learn a little Linux and Python and just build yourself exactly what you want :D

level 1

I use Whatsup Gold. They could use some improvement with their reporting, but its cost is not too bad and does all that I need it to do. I used to have Solarwinds, but they are too damn expensive.

level 1

OpManager if you like an all-in-one that doesn’t look like the UI was last updated in 1995.

level 1

Best and free is Mikrotik's The Dude. I love it. Many people don't realize it supports SNMP, so not only Mikrotik products.

level 2
3 points · 7 days ago

best... I wouldn't go that far. It's cool if you have a lot of Mikrotik devices, and while it supports SNMP, it doesn't scale well at all. Plus the email alerts are meh.

level 2

I am yet to see a product that is as simple as The Dude. I have used it in big and little environments. Just really wish they would turn it into a full blown product that ran on something a little more reliable than windows.

Also the visualization of the links with utilization, absolutely awesome! I generally use it alongside LibreNMS. LibreNMS for historical and the dude for real-time ‘single pane’ view

level 1
-1 points · 7 days ago

Opsview Monitor. Having tried everything this is the one that stuck.

Community Details

127k

Subscribers

1.1k

Online

###Enterprise Networking Routers, switches and firewalls. Network blogs, news and network management articles. Cisco, Juniper, Brocade and more all welcome.

Create Post
r/networking Rules
1.
Rule #1: No Home Networking.
2.
Rule #2: No Certification Brain Dumps / Cheating.
3.
Rule #3: No BlogSpam / Traffic re-direction.
4.
Rule #4: No Low Quality Posts.
5.
Rule #5: No Early Career Advice.
6.
Rule #6: Educational Questions must show effort.
Cookies help us deliver our Services. By using our Services or clicking I agree, you agree to our use of cookies. Learn More.