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I've never made pasta before and I'm planning on making gnocchi, does anyone have any tips so I don't make a fatal mistake? I remember once I made cream puffs, they could have been so perfect if only I let the mix cool before I added the eggs. I thought about it but went "well the recipe doesn't say anything about it", I really don't want this to end up like that lol.

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Basically the only thing I have in my house at the moment is some spaghetti, are there any really simple, low resource recipes I can make?

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Everyone always gushes about how wonderful fresh pasta is; but when I've made it, its been pasta so it's always tasty but I don't get the hubbub. I've used the classic egg and flour a few times, I've even tried ones with olive oil/salt added. Do you all have any tips or explanation? Am I the only one who feels this way?

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I'd like to start by stating that I generally prefer dried pasta to fresh. The pastas I tend to make (mainly from the Central and Southern Italian canon) are better suited to it. Fresh pasta is great but it's not the style of cooking I grew up with, although I do play around with it.

My grocery store go-to is De Cecco. The Whole Foods by me carries Montebello, which is a nice locally-made option (although Whole Foods doesn't get my business anymore). My all time favorite is Afeltra, a brand I've only ever seen at Eataly. Anyone else have any dried pasta faves?

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Hello everyone, first time poster. I recently got into making fresh pasta as a hobby and have been running my own experiments with different ingredients.

Just this past weekend, I got an order of Mac and Cheese from a brewery that was baked in a skillet in the oven. The macaroni noodle they used just absolutely melted in your mouth with a gooey, almost gnocchi like texture! I know different people prefer different noodles but this was a perfect balance for what I enjoy. I unfortunately forgot to ask anyone at the restaurant how they made it...

I want to try to replicate this texture with my pasta. Does this behavior have to do with noodle composition (I can't imagine they made their own pasta) or with cooking procedure? Would love to hear any thoughts!

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Hello, I've been making my own spaghetti for almost a year now, and only just discovered this sub. while I used to do only egg noodles, I now make both egg/flour and semolina/water noodles as of this spring. The water-to-Semolina ratio has been great for pasta I've been making (I eyeball it and add as much water as what two eggs would be for a cup and a half of fkour) I usually only add a touch of salt and oil. I actually prefer the taste of only semolina flour, or almost only semolina flour. Does anyone have a good dough recipe that is good for shaping pasta, preferably with mostly semolina?

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Twenty years ago I ate rigatoni pecorara in a small (Italian-family owned) restaurant in Paris. As far as I remember, the sauce was mostly ground (or minced) veal, olive oil, maybe white wine. No tomato, unless I'm very much mistaken. Definitely no pancetta, no veggies. It doesn't match with the recipes I can find online.
Does anybody know what I'm talking about?

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