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13

I am trying to buy a pressure cooker but can’t decide on one. Am trying to pick between crock pots express cooker, Instant Pot, Gourmia and Insignia pressure cookers.

Out of the ones I just named, which ones would you recommend?

I plan to make lots of chicken/salmon,rice and vegetables dishes.

Which one doesn’t consume lots of energy?

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25 comments
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Crossposted by1 day ago

Last weekend I had decided to risk opening a rift in space-time. I made the same dish in my Instant-Pot and CrockPot at the same time.

Ingredients:

4 Lbs Chicken breast

1 Lb Potato medley

1 Lb Baby carrots

1Lb Red split lentils (aprox 4 cups)

3 small Onions

2 cans diced tomatoes, not drained

6 cloves of Garlic

Aji Amarillo Paste

Everything above was split in half for each pot. Start by dicing the onions, which can go into the IP on Saute with a little olive oil. Chop the garlic and add it to the onions, then cut the chicken and the potatoes into 3-4 cm chunks and add the chicken to the onions and garlic. Toss this around until the chicken has whitened on all sides. Meanwhile, warm 2 cups of water, and mix in a heaping tablespoon of the Aji Amarillo Paste. Once the chicken is ready, turn the IP off and add in the potatoes, tomatoes, carrots, and lentils. Stir to mix, then pour in the water and paste. Cooke for 15 minutes on high pressure.

For the CrockPot, Put everything into the pot in the same order, but without the sauteing. Cook this on high for 4 to 6 hours.

Both dishes made 5 servings. The IP turned the split lentils into a semi porridge. The CrockPot mellowed out the heat of the Aji Amarillo Paste, so I think I might add a little more to it next time.

228 points
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18

When bringing your pressure cooker to the required PSI, is doing so as fast as possible the best way to go about it, or should I keep a medium flame and just check it out every few minutes?

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When you remove the weight from your pressure cooker to avoid over-cooking something, what do you use to avoid burning yourself? That steam hurts pretty bad if you pull away at the wrong angles

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4 comments
6

Hi. So I'm using an electric pressure cooker and it can only pressure cook for a maximum of 30mims. Can I pressure cook more than that time by winding the knob back for another 10 to 15 minutes or so before finally releasing the vent? Sometimes my roasts aren't that tender. Thanks.

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I've been looking into getting a pressure cooker for a while, was planning on waiting till the fall since I have a move coming up but then saw some of the sales today for Instant Pot. Normally I would just probably pick up the basic Duo and be done with it, but they're doing a deal of the day where the the Ultra is almost the same price (for the 8qt) at $120 vs $105. Are these kind of price swings common, and is it worth it to go for it now? I might only need the 6qt version, but the extra room doesn't really hurt much I guess so long as its not huge.

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15 comments
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The cooking time table stinks. It's confusing. It does not state if the meats are frozen or thawed or how much meat to use. Is it possible to overcook something? Can you burn something? Does the amount of liquid change the cooking time? Does the size of the piece of meat matter when cooking? Meaning I have a 1lb chunk of ground beef, would it be better if I broke it up into pieces? TIA

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I want to make tempeh and natto. They can be incubated via yogurt mode in the instant pot, but I can also get a great deal on an 8quart fagor lux lcd. Which of these has a better yogurt setting, and would be better for overall cooking?

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My wife and I are expecting in the fall, and it seems like the pressure cooker could be a good way to make baby food. I just wanted to see if anyone has any specific tips/tricks/recipes/methods that have worked well for them in the past. Thanks!

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Caring for someone after surgery. Looking for soft meat and gluten free dishes. I've already made Congee. I'd like to make a roast, but I don't know how to guarantee it'll be soft.

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Never cooked duck before but kind of want to do something fun.

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43

Ziti with Sausage and Peppers

INGREDIENTS

2 TBSP extra virgin olive oil

1 medium yellow onion, chopped fine

1 medium red or green bell pepper, stemmed, seeded, and cut into 3/4-inch pieces

1.5 lbs hot or sweet Italian sausage, casings removed

2 cloves of garlic, minced

2 TBSP dry red wine, perhaps a nice pinot noir (optional)

1 pound ziti pasta

3.5 cups (28 oz) water

1 (25-ounce) jar tomato or pasta sauce

---------------------------------------------------------

**Variable/Optional (see notes)**

1/2 tsp ground black pepper

1/2 tsp dried oregano

1/2 tsp dried basil

1/2 tsp granulated garlic

1/2 tsp granulated onion

1 TBSP tomato paste

1/4 tsp table salt

1/8 tsp red pepper flakes

---------------------------------------------------------

2-3 dozen fresh basil leaves, cut into thin strips, chiffonade style

3-4 oz parmigiano reggiano, grated fine

INSTRUCTIONS

This was inspired by a Cook's Illustrated recipe, however I've made a lot of my own tweaks. It is shockingly easy and shockingly good. You'll thank me in the morning.

Serves 4-6

  1. Add olive oil to pot and set to sauté. When hot add in onion and pepper. Stir every thirty seconds or so until onion go from translucent to just starting to get a little color, about 5-7 minutes.
  2. Add in sausage, garlic, seasonings and wine (if adding). Stir every 30 seconds or so until the pink is gone from the sausage (but it doesn't necessarily have to be thoroughly cooked), about 5-7 minutes
  3. Add ziti pasta and water and stir.
  4. Top with sauce, close/seal lid and set for manual/high pressure for 5 minutes.
  5. When time is up, quick release pressure and open lid after pressure is done releasing.
  6. Ziti should be rather al dente. To complete the cooking set cooker to sauté. Stir every 20-30 seconds until ziti is fully cooked and sauce consistency is as desired, about 7-10 minutes. If the pot gets too hot and cooks too hard, to avoid scorching switch to "less" sauté mode (or simmer, for a unit like a Fagor) after 3-4 minutes.
  7. Turn to warm mode (or off) and let cool for about 5 minutes.
  8. Serve, and sprinkle the fresh basil and grated cheese on top.

NOTES

  1. The sauce you choose will have probably the most impact on the final product. You may go with simple tomato sauce, or a pasta sauce of your liking. The first time I did it was with a Muir Glen pasta sauce, and I don't think I've ever topped that. Experiment.
  2. The sausage will also be a big determinant - hot, sweet, whatever you like. I grind my own meat and make my own sausage, but I know that is impractical for many. Experiment.
  3. The **Variable/Optional (see notes)** tag is there because these ingredients will probably be represented at least in part in the sauce and sausage combination you select, so you will have to work it out - you might want more, less, or none. Experiment.
  4. Salt - there will be saltiness imparted by the sauce, sausage, and cheese. I'd recommend not adding any salt the first time you make it and see how it comes out. Experiment.
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29

Lately, I've noticed the explosion of countertop electric pressure cookers like the Instant Pot and similar have really led to a boom of pressure cooker users, which I totally approve of. The more, the merrier!

But is there anyone who still uses a stovetop? I personally do, as I like the wider range of control I get over the cooking process, and I have a gas stovetop, so it makes it very easy to change temperature quickly. That said, I imagine there must be personal anecdotes to why each person likes one or the other.

Which do you use? Which do you like? Did you ever switch? Why? I'm genuinely curious to know!

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Preface

I have both an Instant Pot (Duo 8 quart) and a Fagor (Lux 8 quart), two of the most popular multicooker/electric pressure cookers on the market today, and I love them both. Most of the information below is applicable across most of the different model types.

While using them both side by side I have discovered many similarities, but also more differences than meet the eye. After spending far more hours researching and reading about this stuff than I would care to admit, I've learned a few surprising things, and found that even though there is a wealth of information out there, some of it is certainly bad or confusing, and on certain topics, there is definitely a lack of information. I wanted to test some of the things I've been figuring out, and I thought I would post my results here.

It turns out a lot of those programmed function buttons on your IP don't work exactly as most people think, often in a surprisingly good way. Prepare to love your IP even more, and I have more tests coming!

White Rice

Going with the basics, white rice seems like a good place to start. Both units have a function button for white rice - "Rice" for the IP and "White Rice" for the Fagor, however they do work slightly differently. NOTE: The "Rice" function button on the IP is only designed for (most) varieties of white rice, and is not suitable for brown or most other rice/grain varieties. I have found, however, that it works perfectly for quinoa!

Fagor - This unit uses low pressure for white rice, and has a default time under pressure of 10 minutes. I live (mostly) at an elevation of 6,000 feet above sea level, and I do find that a number of things don't quite get cooked using standard recipes. Using the rule of thumb to add 5% to the cooking time for each 1,000 of elevation above 2,000 feet seems to work quite well, so for this comparison I am going with 12 minutes (10 minutes plus 20%) using the "White Rice" function button, and then a 10 minute natural pressure release, and fluffed with a fork at the end.

IP - This is where it gets interesting. The IP "Rice" function button also uses low pressure, but it does not use a fixed time. The literature from the Instant Pot folks says: "The cooking time is adjusted automatically depending on the amount of rice." This is true, but not really in the way implied by that sentence, as the IP has no way of measuring weight or volume. Specific to the "Rice" function only, the IP will determine when the rice is done by monitoring the temperature. When most of the liquid has been absorbed the IP will see a temperature spike, and thus it knows to switch itself to the "Keep Warm" mode and alert you that the pressure cooking time is done. I have found that it works out to a time under pressure that averages very closely to the times discussed above for the Fagor, and I also use a 10 minute natural pressure release, with the rice fluffed with a fork at the end.

The Recipe

-2 Cups Long Grain White Rice

-2 Cups Water

-2 TBSP Soy Sauce (low sodium, in this case, because that is what was in the fridge)

-2 TBSP Extra Virgin Olive Oil (also good with an equal amount of butter, instead)

-Rice rinsed under running water for 30-60 seconds, drained for 30-60 seconds (*this is a very important step*)

The Results

Delicious! Seriously, they both turned out wonderful rice. Fluffy, moist, just very slightly sticky, but the individual grains were slightly firm. In other words, about as close to perfect rice (to my preferences, at least) as I am likely to produce (and individual preferences could easily be accommodated by adding/subtracting small intervals to the natural pressure release time). There was virtually no difference between the two - if I could pinpoint any difference at all it would be that the Fagor rice seemed very slightly firmer, but not even enough to call it al dente, and it was so slight that it might be my imagination. If I am not imagining it I would guess that it might be because the IP runs a bit hotter than the Fagor. Low pressure yields 5.8 ~7.2 psi and 110°C ~ 112°C (229 ~ 233°F) for the IP, and 4 ~7 psi and 108°C ~ 110°C (226 ~ 230°F) for the Fagor. Those numbers would be somewhat lower, factoring in elevation. Also, the 5% elevation rule mentioned above is just a rule of thumb, not an exact formula.

If I were blindfolded and being fed random forkfuls of both (which I will not do - not after The Great Blindfold Hot Wings Debacle of 2016), I don't think I could really tell when changing between the two.

And the winner is... The Instant Pot! While I consider it a tie as far as taste/doneness/texture goes (they both did great), I would give the edge to the IP because the automation of the "Rice" function button. I am constantly pressure cooking stuff in different locations (and elevations), and not needing to worry about any calculations, even though a quite small issue, is a big plus to me. Also, should I happen to add more or less liquid (intentionally or otherwise) I think the rice would be more likely to turn out correctly with the IP.

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23

Have an instant pot, mostly use it for black beans once or twice a week. Always get the same beans in bulk from Sprouts market, use the same method, 2 cups beans ~5.5 cups water, set on manual high pressure for 45 mins, slow release until I get around to emptying out (1-3hrs).

This last batch I changed nothing and the beans were still almost crunchy like they hadn't cooked fully. It definitely sealed right, as I've made that mistake before and had all the water boil off. So I put the beans back in, added more water and set for another 25 minutes and a slow release. Beans still weren't right. Not soft/edible like they should be.

Maybe a bad batch of beans? Trying again now.... guess I'll report back.

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Hi, I am in Germany and since there is no Instant Pot here, I need to order it from the UK with added shipping. The Cosori is available here for a lot cheaper. Is the Instant Pot worth the premium?

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hi, wondering if there is any chance to get tatung 3-cups rice cooker 240V (not 120V) directly from taiwan or europe, because there´s a poor distribution of tatung rice cookers, especially in the czech republic. the expected rice cookers from tatung CZECH got cancelled by their company managment:-(

i´ve found and ordered (the only size they have) 6-cups version from uk, but i´d like to buy a smaller one for a friend. therefore, i´d be grateful for any tips or link to reliable shops in europe or taiwan (240V) with reasonable prices and accept paypal . there´s nothing better than a delicious bowl of rice:-) thanks!

note:a question to tatung 3-cups users. which one do you prefer? the old classic TAC-3A-SF or new plastic TAC-03DW ? thanks!

https://i.redd.it/0oj9n2wjki511.jpg

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