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ArchivedStickied postModerator of r/TheoryOfReddit

Meta events often create quite a few posts here on ToR. The most recent events have been the firing of Reddit employees, blackout of subreddits, and banning of harassing subreddits. These events often have a handful or more removed posts because of their content. Let's just go over what us moderators usually remove during these meta events:

  • Theory-less, general meta content: general meta news or drama that is more appropriate for /r/metahub, /r/SubredditDrama, or other meta subreddits.

  • Drama-inducing posts. This can be intentional or unintentional. Sometimes, like the recent FPH banning, certain posts can bait unwanted, uncivil discussions/users/communities into ToR. You should generally stick to the affected communities if you want to engage in drama or make a post that might invite it, or if they don't allow it, consider posting to /r/self.

  • Witch hunts. Not appropriate anywhere and we will report your actions to the admins.

  • Complaining. While posts with adequate theory that complain a bit are okay, general whining or complaining posts are better suited for /r/circlebroke. If they don't allow it, consider /r/self. Complaining about moderator abuse should probably go to /r/subredditcancer or /r/self.

  • Reddit features. This should go to /r/ideasfortheadmins. From the sidebar: "This subreddit should focus on data, issues, solutions, or strategies that could be reasonably addressed or implemented by users and moderators, not admins."

Please also take a moment to review our On-Topic Statement:

Theory of Reddit is a mildly navel-gazing space for inquiring into what makes Reddit communities work and what we in a community can do to help make it better.

This is a moderated/curated subreddit. Submissions determined to fall outside of the stated topic will be removed by the moderators.

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As l peruse the comments here on Reddit, I've become increasingly aware of a seemingly unpopular activity called karma whoring, in which users post... content that they somehow know will be highly upvoted?

So ok, I can see why that would be obnoxious if they're just reposting stuff that's already been popular in the past, or worse, copy-paste-ing some other user's original comments into other threads. What I don't understand is

Why do it?

Simply, I don't understand what the perceived value is in having a Reddit account with lots of karma.

Thanks for your input.

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I’ve seen it around different subs, people seem to freak out when the get it. Can someone tell me how it works? Thanks.

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114

I stumbled upon an account thats fresh, pushes a specific political viewpoint with basically identical phrasing across multiple subs, talks about one candidate and identifies themselves as a former/retired [position of authority].

https://www.reddithelp.com/en/categories/rules-reporting/account-and-community-restrictions/what-should-i-do-if-i-see-something-i

Is the link for if you go to a user's page and click "Report User".

Is reddit even attempting to combat astroturfing? Have they published how many users have been banned as a result of astroturfing?

It really doesn't seem like they take it very seriously at all considering recent events, but to literally not be able to report a user page seems strange.

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It's about propaganda and how I really hate it on Reddit.

Basically the reason behind the downvote can be many things. But for me it's because of propaganda.

Quite a few political subs from both extremes use interesting memes and jokes to gain upvotes and a following. The memes themselves can be funny. I remember I used to upvote a lot of the t_d posts as I found them funny and considered the sub just a meme sub. Later I found out it was a political sub and stopped considering the posts funny. Now I consider them political. But I don't downvote them either unless they spam my frontpage.

The same has happened to me with a socialist joke subreddit. I used to upvote the jokes on the frontpage and smile at them. Then I started going to the comment section and was flabbergasted by how much hate mongering went on there. I did not want to support hate and appeal to violence. Now I sometimes upvote the posts from that sub when they make me smile but as soon as I read the name of the sub itself I downvote them. I know the memes are propaganda and I know what the sub is used for. It has disguised itself as a joke sub but in reality that's just an appeal to reel in followers.

But now I'm wondering. How do other people feel about downvoting posts just because they are from a sub you know spreads hate and violence in this world? I only do it when I spot such a post on a frontpage but it still makes me think.

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It’s no secret that reddit can be considered “liberal,” whether you are considering the nature of popular content, the political views of the users, etc.

The way I see it, reddit is always showing you what is popular among their users, so it’s no surprise that a left-leaning user base will make left-leaning posts and comments popular, which is the way it should be. it would be wrong to censor a certain amount of posts or comments to try to make the whole landscape seem more politically equal.

But my question is, is reddit inherently liberal, where it will always attract a liberal population, or is reddit (like the rest of the world) on a political pendulum that has just yet to swing to the right? It’s subjective, but I want your opinions.

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139

Most of the posts in r/aww are cute dogs and cats, the occasional monkey. If a cute baby is posted, the natives will tend to attack, downvoting both the post and anyone who comments positively. The result is that cute babies are being spat on by people who mostly comment in baby-talk: "He a good boi!" "Snoot snoot!" It's a little odd.

No harm is done, but people posting pictures of their own kids can be taken by surprise.

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309

The introduction of comments on Reddit in December 2005 was a momentous occasion that changed the website forever. However the traditional story behind the first ever Reddit comment turns out to be wrong and there is still a mystery over what the first comment was and who wrote it.

In this post we will try to solve that mystery.

On December 12th 2005, at 10:47:49 UTC, /u/Nutshapio made a post called 'Reddit now supports comments'.

Roughly two hours later, at 12:46:44 UTC, /u/charlieb made the first comment on that post:

http://goedhartvoordieren.nl/?page=r/reddit.com/comments/17913/reddit_now_supports_comments/c51/

There's nothing like simplicity and not following the crowd. I for one welcome our new comment spam overlords. Oh and by the way; 1) Come up with a great simple idea 2) Wait for a degree of popularity and media attention 3) Add unnecessary features 4) Profit. Is this what you want?

This comment became semi-famous on Reddit as the first ever Reddit comment. It was a humorous factoid that the first comment was complaining about Reddit going downhill. The comment was the subject of a bestof post, a TIL post, was duly installed in the Museum of Reddit, and noted by an Admin in an Announcements post about the history of Reddit:

They launched commenting. (The first comment, fittingly, was about how comments are going to ruin Reddit.)

But it was not the first Reddit comment.

The post by /u/Nutshapio mentioned above (Reddit now supports comments) originally linked to another post that contained an even earlier comment, this time made by /u/bugbear on the same day at 10:41:59 UTC (two hours before /u/charlieb's comment):

http://goedhartvoordieren.nl/?page=r/reddit.com/comments/17844/illegal_immoral_and_pointless_the_new_york_times/c26/

Note that /u/charlieb's comment link ends in "c51".

/u/bugbear's earlier comment link ends in "c26".

"c" presumably stands for "comment", so I am searching for the comment ending in "c1" - the first ever Reddit comment. Or, if that doesn't exist, "c2" etc. I am looking for the lowest number that exists.

I am hoping that some of you Redditors might be able to find it with Github (or perhaps even an Admin with their advanced search functions) and help me clear up this mystery.

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I've been tracking bot/spam accounts and saw a bunch of them posting to http://goedhartvoordieren.nl/?page=r/FreeKarma4You/

How is this allowed? Section 4 of Reddit's content policy explicitly says asking for upvotes/karma is prohibited (https://www.redditinc.com/policies/content-policy)

Would love to get some input and perhaps past examples of why this is allowed. AFAIK, there is no way to report an account or a subreddit for abusing Reddit's content policy.

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I'm new to Reddit but have heard a bit about social media's tendency (Reddit) to be information greedy to say the least.

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I'm thinking of an automod function where reposts are hidden at first. The automod would post a comment indicating that it is a repost and then explain the following: the original poster must reply with why they think it deserves to stay. After they reply the post is restored but if that comment reaches negative 10 karma then it is deleted.

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Like some subreddits seem harmless but just imagine if you, your child, a friend or a loved one ended up on it.

I’d be fucking pissed. Like on /r/13or30 seems like a joke and is satire but if someone used a picture of me or my family and memed it like that I’d be mad.

It’s not just that sub though. A lot of subreddits seem harmless but in reality it’s just a bunch of people making fun of someone.

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If culture flows from the way people interact with and within the physical environment, then the tools we provide within the physical environment of reddit will be the only way to affect cultural change. Right now we have up and down votes, which are blunt instruments of judgement. But, they're used in so many ways, because the bluntness begs refinement. An up vote can mean, "I support", "I approve", "I agree", "That's funny", "Nice ass" and "I'm so sorry for your loss". Down votes have equal range. Comments allow us to refine the message of our vote and now flair allows us to position our status, votes, comments and selves within the community. All of these tools are available within subs, and used to make subs effective in their missions. A further set of culture shapers are the mods. These members have tools that I am just learning, and they are powerful. But regardless of the sub, or mods, Haters hate, Laughers laugh and Admirers admire all using the same tools.

In the past few years I've noticed that the tools are becoming complex enough to change the overall tone of Reddit. I've lived on Reddit under one username or another since just before the day's of Narwals and the great Orangered/Perrywinkle war. I've abandoned Reddit several times because of massive downward collective spirals around Ellen Pao and during US elections. But, now there seems to be a bit of a ballast to the boat and sites like r/happy and r/CasualConversation seem to be able to survive without being crushed by the blunter tools and cabals.

A few weeks ago after lurking on these gentler sites I got thinking about the natural connection reddit has to the news and political cycles. Infrastructure type sites have been built to instantly link us to and drive us into real-time conversations in these larger issues. But, I'm wondering if reddit can be used to create culture around our daily events such as sleep and bowel movements.

For example, what if there was an easy way to let reddit know you were going to bed. And, those online, or within digital earshot could receive the message and say then "tuck you in". Would this humanize the site? Would a tool like this let shift workers in Australia better connect with office workers in California? What would happen if all the people going to bed at 18:00 GMT just knew where to go to offer a kind word to a fellow human just before they drift off to sleep. Would this softening tool lead to a softer reddit? Could such a tool even exist?

We all know that everyone sleeps and we all like to be tucked in, so how can we create a cultural connection to the physical reality that one part or another of reddit is ALWAYS GOING TO SLEEP and, in the same way one part or another of reddit is ALWAYS EVACUATING THEIR BOWELS.

These are things I'm going to play with. If you have thoughts or want to help reddit tuck each other in or track bowel movements, let me know. The subs are very basic but are being built now. r/nitenite and r/1or2 .

Edit: spelling and grammar

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I seldom upvote, and really never downvote. Way to often fantastic posts are very long and nuanced, and I immediately begin to read peoples reactions to it. Scrolling back to the beginning, (especialy on phones) is a bit annoying.

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All posts in www.reddit.com/r/politics/rising appear to be more than 2 hours old. F5oclock.com is unable to load any posts from /r/politics/rising though, I'm not sure how it interacts with the Reddit API in order to deliver content.

Is anyone else experiencing this?

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why did they do this to us? the only thing i ever wanted was for the page to not spontaneously skip around on mobile causing me to lose my place. Also, for the mobile to stop pushing the reddit app. Also for mobile commenting to be faster, but that's probably just my phone.

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Mine is surprisingly low - around 15 seconds. If a gif is longer than that, no matter how many upvotes or gildings, I'll just skip it.
Long gifs are like multipart tweet threads; it's the wrong medium.

[Yes, only certain moving image formats on certain hosts show this number.]

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We know we can't comment/vote on posts that are older than 5 months.

Is there a cut off for karma prior to that? Someone told me 7 days, someone said a month.

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It is likely that If a person disagrees with a post it is likely that they will down vote it and extremely unlikely that they will up vote that idea. Another thing everyone knows is that typically Reddit shows the most popular posts by default. HOWEVER topics that are disagreed with are unlikely to get high ratings thus possibly preventing the opinions to reach the people who would agree and be interested in these opinions. So what solution did Reddit come up with. The controversial feed that shows you unpopular, constantly changing opinions. So, if you're looking to hear some opinions you agree with it might be worth trying the controversial feed

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Do redditors downvote or upvote less accounts with a minority sounding account name ?

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It used to be, if you wanted to make an incisive and cutting sarcastic joke, you just made it. Obviously, text is a different format than conversation, so maybe something got lost in translation, but if you are a person who is good at making jokes - ie, the sort of person whose jokes anyone else wants to read in the first place - then you could take that in stride and maybe reword your joke for the medium you're actually operating in.

But then some people didn't like that, and decided that written discourse needed an equivalent to the snide condescending Chandler Bing tone of voice, as to say "Yes, this is something I took the time and effort and bandwidth to write, and post, but I in no way advocate for it".

The percentage of hilarious sarcastic "jokes" ending with a /s I've ever actually laughed at is insanely small (~3-5%, maybe?), and those comments were all readily understood as jokes without the markdown...

The only people the /s tag benefits are people who are bad at comedy, or too lazy to actually make a point of their own.

"But without the /s, I'll get downvotes from people who Don't Get It".

Fuck you, kid. That's comedy.

Edit: As many people have pointed out, it seems that the /s predates Reddit. I'd never seen it before here, but everything comes from somewhere. Really doesn't have much bearing on my actual point.

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I don't get it. Google and Facebook most likely have to do complicated natural language parsing based on search queries and statuses/comments respectively to determine what your interests, but on Reddit, user's literally tell you what they are into with what subs they are subscribed to. Shouldn't it be very easy to offer high intent advertisements like Google does and make but loads of cash? What do you all think?

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I’ve seen a lot of people do this for simple typos. Why is it so important?

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Are there really that many hot women on reddit willing to share that much? Or are there web cam and scort services involved?

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What does Reddit gain by hiding this information from us? I think they did so to make consensus appear much easier. More concensus equals less fights equals easier to prove to ad-men what's "hitting" with so and so demographic.

for instance you can see someone with 103 votes and a new user assumes "wow! popular! without knowing they have a huge amount of downvotes.

You can't actually measure how controversial a statement is anymore because Reddit insists on hiding vote counts. Anyone have any better, more supported ideas as to why it's like this?

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**Theory of Reddit** is a mildly navel-gazing space for inquiring into what makes Reddit communities work and what we in a community can do to help make it better. This subreddit should focus on data, issues, solutions, or strategies that could be reasonably addressed or implemented **by users and moderators**, not admins.

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