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Boson NetSim vs Packet Tracer vs pearson network simulator by STEM_FTW in ccna

[–]0ut1awed 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I never actually used Pearson's. I took a glance at the light version and it looked comprable to most PT labs, maybe even more basic but I'll let someone else her can comment on it.

I've use multiple sources for PT assignments. Netacad, Lammel's, and David Bombals are just a few that come to mind. None of them come close to getting as in-depth as NetSim. It has tons of labs and a very thought provoking way of taking you deep into the concepts while doing it. Also the simulator is much more robust in the commands it supports and it feels a lot closer to the real thing.

I've used GNS3 a lot too which is essentially the real thing and it has it's place. What GNS3 doesn't have are those very structured labs, it's just a sandbox.

Live Artist of the Day: Bonobo by HazenThorne in ElectricForest

[–]0ut1awed 2 points3 points  (0 children)

North Borders ties for one of two albums that are my favorite of all time. Yet I've never gotten a chance to see him, especially not with his full live crew. I shed a few tears when I saw him on the lineup.

Filtering different machines with different list by 0ut1awed in pihole

[–]0ut1awed[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Hmm okay. The location I'm looking into needs something to block out certain websites for low level employees, possibly redirecting them to a password protected bypass although that part isn't 100% necessary.

I've actually never dealt with such site blocking on networks but I've had a lot of experince and happy customers with the PiHole. It's a small customer so it's not like they need any enterprise software with 3rd party manged lists. I was hoping PiHole could handle their requirements but I guess it's on to something else.

Thanks

Question about ccnp by Zorbes in ccna

[–]0ut1awed 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Yup. I'm not waiting a year or anything to start my CCNP studies but I'm going to spend some time diversifying beforehand. I've jumped into a bunch of Udemy courses for Wireshark, Python for networking, Linux for networking, SDN, etc

These exams seem to do more than test your knowledge by 0ut1awed in ccna

[–]0ut1awed[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

That's true. It's defiantly not a surefire thing to test on but I'm still suspect that the weighting has some correlation to what I mentioned.

These exams seem to do more than test your knowledge by 0ut1awed in ccna

[–]0ut1awed[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Some of it is defiantly the weighting though. My ICND2 break down numbers were 81%, 82%, 50%, 63%, and 78% and yet I still got a 904 which would translate to a 90 in the traditional grading system.

Are these books still relevant? by prophetmonarch in ccna

[–]0ut1awed 0 points1 point  (0 children)

And while we're on the subject of text books and their prices, it's going to be one of the cheapest text books you ever buy (at least given my time in school) at only $40 for the 200-125 OCG. It comes with tons of extra digital content too including hundreds of practice questions.

I just find it so laughable now to look back on all the text books that cost me hundreds of dollars and yet the most critical ones to my career were just a few bucks.

CCNA 2 NetAcad College Exam by [deleted] in ccna

[–]0ut1awed 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I took the Netacad 1 and 2 courses under my university a couple years back. I can tell you that the solutions for everything in the class are out there and pretty easy to find, even the final.

That said, it's still cheating. You're not going to learn anything from it compared to actually studying the material so it really comes comes down to your morals and what you want to get out of the course.

How did you guys study SNMP? by 0ut1awed in ccna

[–]0ut1awed[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Yeah I've had no issues running Win 7 in the VM other than the LAN assets over the virtual NIC. I'm sure even this can be mitigated with a bit of research as admittely I haven't spent a lot of time looking into it. Overall I've had a pleasant experience in the past year having Linux as my native OS. It seems to be a bit more resource friendly than Windows. I look forward to digging deeper into Linux administration once I get my solid foot in the network world.

Oh and Cacti actually has been rather easy to interface with as well. I threw it on a Pi that I had laying around and dropped it into my lab. It's been a fun little project and not nearly as time consuming as I originally thought.

How did you guys study SNMP? by 0ut1awed in ccna

[–]0ut1awed[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

This is something I have noticed on my time here as well and why I'm trying not to make the same mistakes. Thanks and thanks for the NMS suggestions below. As I said, my OS solution is kinda screwing me given my time frame but I think I'm gonna dip into a Cacti this weekend.

How did you guys study SNMP? by 0ut1awed in ccna

[–]0ut1awed[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Yeah that was my first approach but I think I've made this process even harder for myself. I've been taking the swim or sink approach to Linux for a while now and therefore my system is running Ubuntu nativley. I do have a Win 7 VM on it for anything I need which will usually suffice in a situation like this. However I haven't had much luck with the VM to play nicely with other LAN assets, be it via a virtual NAT or a bridged connection.

I found Cacti and I might try it out. However again I am a week away from the ICND2 so learning my way around a whole SNMP manger isn't an ideal use of my time over other things I could be studying. It is ultimately a situation I put myself in so I can't really complain.

OSPFv3 vs v2. Why set OSPF on interface for v3? by arhombus in ccna

[–]0ut1awed 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Oh man, here I am about to take the ICND2 and you're getting me excited for the CCIE. XD

Thanks.

OSPFv3 vs v2. Why set OSPF on interface for v3? by arhombus in ccna

[–]0ut1awed 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Ahh gotcha. I won't stress about that distinction then. Thanks!

OSPFv3 vs v2. Why set OSPF on interface for v3? by arhombus in ccna

[–]0ut1awed 0 points1 point  (0 children)

OSPFv3 just uses interface commands because it is primarily a ipv6 routing protocol.

This brings up a similar question I've been meaning to ask. OSPFv3 =/= only IPv6 right? The OCG refers to families making it possible for OSPFv3 to handle both IPv4 and IPv6 without the need for OPSFv2. However in most of the study material I run into (even with the rest of the OCG), it's implied that OSPFv3 is referring to IPv6. For example I've run into a few questions that include both OSPFv2 & 3 and use OSPFv2/IPv4 and OSPFv3/IPv6 pretty much synonymously within the scope of the question.

Is Orbi the best system for large distances/walls between nodes? by graeme_b in orbi

[–]0ut1awed 0 points1 point  (0 children)

If I'm reading your post right then you're not sure what a switch or access point is (even though you mention an access point in the OP)?

These point-to-point devices are relatively simple to setup but they are a step beyond what's required of an Orbi setup, which might be a problem if I'm gauging your technical level right. This video gives you an idea of what you need to go through on both devices. Again they're designed to be outside with line of site, setup like this. When you said courtyard it sounded like something like this might be possible. You should be able to get through a couple of walls with that material no problem at that distance. You will want to at least mount them to a wall in a manor that they point directly at each other. I can't say this enough but be aware that these are designed for line of site and YMMV if you're shooting them through walls. However I'd be willing to bet you're going to get exceptionally better throughput than 20/20 like you currently have and it should be consistent.

If you do go that route, you could just use the Orbi system you already have. With recent firmware, Orbi satellites now support Ethernet backhaul meaning you could just simply use two of these point-to-point devices and plug the Ethernet coming out of them directly into the Orbi router and Orbi satellite on either side.

Alternatives to book study by lellife in ccna

[–]0ut1awed 3 points4 points  (0 children)

Take this with a grain of salt but maybe a networking centric role isn't your best suit (if that's your outcome)?

There hasn't been a single textbook in my life that I've been able to really enjoy or get through without having the same response you said about Lammle's. This includes curriculum that I did have some interest in when getting my BS in IT. That all changed with networking and CCNA material. I have thoroughly enjoyed reading through Odom's book which is generally considered much drier than Lammle's.

Don't get me wrong, if I didn't mix any labbing in with it then I'd defiantly tire of just reading the concepts. However if you're only on Chapter 2 of Lammle's book and saying it's very dry... I just don't know how far you'll be able to professionally progress in the networking field. Again take this at face value, maybe I'm totally wrong in my thought process. Just something to think about.

Edit: I don't want to be all doom and gloom so I will play the devil's advocate here as well. Chapters 1 through 5 in Lammle's ICND1 are really the true foundational theory groundwork to everything that will follow. Chapter 4 and 5 are centered around subnetting so even they get into more stuff you can kind of quantify with hands on practice. Chapter 6 is where you start to get into the IOS and really hit the fun hands on stuff. So maybe try and stick it out through a few more chapters? Lammle is really going to be your best bet in terms of least dryness and while you technically can use just videos, it's defiantly not advised as you're going to miss a lot of the small things.

Is Orbi the best system for large distances/walls between nodes? by graeme_b in orbi

[–]0ut1awed 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I'm having trouble fully understanding your environment based on your description but it sounds like a point-to-point setup might be a good solution. You would need two devices at around $100 each plus a switch and access point on the other side.

They are meant for line of site which is why the 50' courtyard made it pop into mind. However these bad boys are designed to go miles so at that short of a distance a wall or two shouldn't be that detrimental, depending on what the walls are made out of. You'll defiantly get better than the current reduction from 300Mbps to 20Mpbs down you have and it will be consistent.

What is your IT career goal? by SilverXCIV in computertechs

[–]0ut1awed 0 points1 point  (0 children)

The only thing I'm really sure about is what I want to obtain knowledge wise. I want to eventually get my CCIE along with some knowledge in Juniper, Palo Alto, Python for network automation, and Linux. I'm hoping to have all this under the belt in at least 5 years.

I have no idea what my ideal job will be but obviously it will be some kind of networking engineering role relative to all of that. I have absolute zero desire to be in a management position or a position where I don't get any hands on, but that's just me.

Has anyone tried this? Frank Brewing Co Honey Habanero Ale by handsome666 in spicy

[–]0ut1awed 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I was gonna say the same thing until I saw your comment.

That was the first spicy beer I had and it was fantastic. A lot spicier than I expected and great flavor. I've tried numerous spicy beers since then, be it big name, small batch, or even local breweries. Some of them aren't bad beers but on the spice level it seems like the equivalent of 1/20th of a jalapeno goes into each beer.

Somber reminder to take care of yourselves by Tobias_Z in networking

[–]0ut1awed 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Fitness Blender has been a really awesome find. Lets you select all sorts of variables to work with like difficulty and interval times, not to mention it's free.

Orbi AC3000 system is one of The Worst Routers I have ever owned. by oridjinn in orbi

[–]0ut1awed 8 points9 points  (0 children)

I guess there are some bad apples out there for everything?

Seriously though, I manage tons of residential and small office networks for my job. I'm in the process of moving on to a strictly network engineering role.

I've installed close to 15 AC3000s at various sites over the past year. Not one single call back about issues. There were indeed some fleeting issues with firmware upgrade during the installation process at the start of the installs. I haven't run into that in a while though and those issues were always solved before I left the site during the initial install.

I see these posts and really wonder what is happening. A product of the environment? User? End devices? The funny thing is that Netgear is pretty unanimously considered garbage in the networking world, much more on the enterprise side. I've personally never seen any of their residential produtcs live up to their price tag (looking directly at you, Nighthawks). That is until the Orbi came along.

I'd seriously try and swap your equipment because the only explanation I have is it being faulty. That or give some serious consideration into where you're placing the units and all the environmental factors that could effect both the backhaul and client wireless. I've been at a client's house that had interior tin insulation with absolute garbage wifi with every solution that came his way. I dropped the Orbi and tested ~100' from the satellite where the satellite was ~100' from the base station. 115Mbps where the hardwired test was from the base was 117Mbps.

These bad boys definitely have done nothing but made me nerd out so hard during every install. I'd consider what I just mentioned before moving on to another product.