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Week 4: Poaching - Poached Pear and Almond Tart by AllyYours in 52weeksofcooking

[–]AllyYours[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I've never poached anything prior to this week! I enjoyed this theme, but I would probably not make this again. It's a lot of work for a dessert that just turned out pretty good. I included the full recipe because Cook's Illustrated is a pay site.

Poached Pear and Almond Tart

From Cook's Illustrated

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS

Since a poached pear and almond tart requires a substantial investment of time, we wanted our pear tart recipe to be worthwhile. During our testing, we determined that ripe yet firm Bosc or Bartlett pears gave our pear tart recipe the best flavor, especially when poached in white wine spiced with a cinnamon stick, black peppercorns, whole cloves, and a vanilla bean. For the frangipane in our pear tart recipe, we processed blanched slivered almonds in a food processor with sugar, so they could be ground superfine without becoming greasy. We made sure to dry the pears before setting them on the frangipane—otherwise, they released moisture, turning the dessert sticky and wet.

INGREDIENTS

Poached Pears

  • 1 bottle white wine (750 ml)
  • ⅔ cup granulated sugar (about 4 1/2 ounces)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice from 1 lemon plus 4 or 5 large strips zest removed with vegetable peeler
  • 3 inch piece cinnamon stick
  • 15 whole black peppercorns
  • 3 whole cloves
  • ⅛ teaspoon table salt
  • ½ vanilla bean, slit in half lengthwise (optional)
  • 4 ripe but firm pears (about 8 ounces each), preferably Bosc or Bartlett

Tart Pastry (Pâte Sucrée)

  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 ½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour (7 1/2 ounces)
  • ¾ cup confectioners' sugar (3 ounces)
  • ¼ teaspoon table salt
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter (1 1/4 sticks), very cold, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

Almond Filling (Frangipane)

  • 4 ounces blanched slivered almonds (1 cup)
  • ½ cup granulated sugar (3 1/2 ounces)
  • ⅛ teaspoon table salt
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 large egg white
  • ½ teaspoon almond extract
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 6 pieces and softened to room temperature

Glaze

  • ¼ cup apple jelly

INSTRUCTIONS

MAKES ONE 11-INCH TART, SERVING 10 TO 12

This tart has several components, but each can be prepared ahead, and the tart is baked several hours before serving. If you cannot find blanched slivered almonds, use whole blanched almonds, but chop them coarsely before processing to make sure they form a fine, even grind. The pears should be ripe but firm, the flesh giving slightly when gently pressed with a finger. Purchase the pears a few days ahead and allow them to ripen at room temperature. If they ripen before you need them, refrigerate them and use them within a day or two, or poach them and hold them in their syrup (they will keep for about 3 days). Many tasters liked the bright, crisp flavor of pears poached in Sauvignon Blanc. Chardonnay-poached pears had deeper, oakier flavors and were also well liked.

1. TO POACH THE PEARS: Combine wine, sugar, lemon juice and zest, cinnamon, peppercorns, cloves, and salt in large, nonreactive saucepan. Scrape seeds from vanilla bean pod (if using), and add seeds and pod to saucepan. Bring mixture to simmer over medium heat, stirring occasionally to dissolve sugar. Meanwhile, halve, core, and peel pears (see illustrations below). Slide pears into simmering wine; increase heat to high and return to simmer; then reduce heat to low and simmer; covered; until pears are tender; toothpick or skewer inserted into pear should slide in and out with very little resistance; and outer edges of pears have turned translucent; about 10 minutes; turning pears in liquid halfway through poaching time using wooden spoon or spatula. Off heat, cool pears in liquid, partially covered, until pears have turned translucent and are cool enough to handle, about 1 hour. (Pears and liquid may be transferred to nonreactive bowl or container, cooled to room temperature, covered, and refrigerated for up to 3 days.)

2. FOR THE TART PASTRY: Whisk together yolk, cream, and vanilla in small bowl. Combine flour, sugar, and salt in food processor with four 1-second pulses. Scatter butter pieces over flour mixture; pulse to cut butter into flour until mixture resembles coarse meal, about twenty 1-second pulses. With machine running, add egg mixture and process until dough comes together, about 12 seconds. Turn dough onto sheet of plastic wrap and press into 6-inch disk; wrap with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 1 hour or up to 48 hours.

  1. Remove dough from refrigerator (if refrigerated longer than 1 hour, let stand at room temperature until malleable). Unwrap and roll out between lightly floured large sheets of parchment paper or plastic wrap (or piece 4 small sheets together to form 2 large sheets) to 15-inch round. (If dough becomes soft and sticky, slip onto baking sheet and refrigerate until workable, about 20 minutes.) Transfer dough to tart pan by rolling dough loosely over rolling pin and unrolling over 11-inch tart pan with removable bottom. Working around circumference of pan, ease dough into pan corners by gently lifting dough with one hand while pressing dough into corners with other hand. Press dough into fluted sides of pan, patching breaks or cracks if necessary. (If some edges are too thin, reinforce sides by folding excess dough back on itself.) Run rolling pin over top of tart pan to remove excess dough. Set dough-lined tart pan on baking sheet or large plate and freeze 30 minutes. (Frozen dough-lined tart pan can be wrapped tightly in plastic wrap and frozen up to 1 month.)

  2. Meanwhile, adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 375 degrees. Set dough-lined tart pan on baking sheet; lightly spray one side of 18-inch square heavy-duty extra-wide foil with nonstick cooking spray. Press foil, greased-side down, inside frozen tart shell, folding excess foil over edge of tart pan; fill with metal or ceramic pie weights. Bake until dry, pale gold, and edges have just begun to color, about 20 minutes, rotating halfway through baking. Remove from oven and carefully remove foil and weights by gathering edges of foil and pulling up and out. Set baking sheet with tart shell on wire rack and cool to room temperature, about 30 minutes.

3. FOR THE ALMOND FILLING: Pulse almonds, sugar, and salt in food processor until finely ground, about 25 two-second pulses; process until as finely ground as possible, about 10 seconds longer. Add egg and egg white, almond and vanilla extracts; process until combined, about 10 seconds. Add butter and process until no lumps remain, about 10 seconds. Scrape bottom and sides of bowl with rubber spatula and process to combine thoroughly, about 10 seconds longer. (Can be refrigerated in airtight container up to 3 days. Before using, let stand at room temperature about 30 minutes to soften, stirring 3 or 4 times.)

4. TO ASSEMBLE, BAKE, AND GLAZE THE TART: Reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees. Remove pears from poaching liquid; set pears cut-side down on triple thickness paper towels and pat dry with additional paper towels. Follow illustrations 1 through 6, below, to spread frangipane in tart shell and slice and arrange pears.

  1. Bake tart on baking sheet until crust is deep golden brown and almond filling is puffed, browned, and firm to the touch, about 45 minutes, rotating baking sheet halfway through baking time. Cool tart on baking sheet on wire rack 10 minutes.

  2. Bring jelly to boil in small saucepan over medium heat, stirring occasionally to smooth out lumps. When boiling and completely melted, brush glaze on pears. Cool tart to room temperature, about 2 hours. (Tart can be kept at room temperature longer but should be served the day it is made.)

  3. Remove outer metal ring of tart pan, slide thin metal spatula between bottom of crust and tart pan bottom to release, then slip tart onto cardboard round or serving platter; cut into wedges and serve.

 

 

STEP-BY-STEP

Assembling the Tart

  1. Spread frangipane evenly into partially baked and cooled tart shell using offset icing spatula.

  2. Cut one pear half crosswise into 3/8-inch slices; do not separate slices, and leave pear half intact on cutting board. Pat dry with paper towels to absorb excess moisture.

  3. Discard first 4 slices from narrow end of sliced pear half. Slide icing spatula under sliced pear and, steadying it with one hand, slide pear to center of tart.

  4. Cut and dry another pear half following step 2. Slide spatula under pear and gently press pear to fan slices toward narrow end.

  5. Slide fanned pear onto frangipane, narrow end toward center, making a flower-petal pattern off the center pear.

  6. Repeat steps 2, 4, and 5 with remaining pear halves, spacing them evenly. If necessary, use spatula to push pears to space them evenly.

STEP-BY-STEP

Preparing the Pears for Poaching

  1. Cut each pear in half through stem and blossom ends. With tip of paring knife, cut out seed core from each pear half.

  2. Remove blossom end of each pear half, then remove thin fibrous core and stem by making V-shaped incision along both sides of the core.

  3. Working quickly to avoid discoloration, peel cored pear halves with vegetable peeler.

[Homemade] Banoffee Pie with homemade dulce de leche by tommen_b in food

[–]AllyYours 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Thank you so much! I'll be trying this later on in the weekend!

Week 3: Portuguese - Arroz de Pato by AllyYours in 52weeksofcooking

[–]AllyYours[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

It wasn't difficult, but it did take a few hours to make. Worth it for sure... especially if you like duck!

Week 3: Portuguese - Arroz de Pato by AllyYours in 52weeksofcooking

[–]AllyYours[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Thank you so much. I usually make it in my rice cooker, so I was concerned I would mess this up. Thankfully, the recipe was spot.

Week 3: Portuguese - Arroz de Pato by AllyYours in 52weeksofcooking

[–]AllyYours[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I used this recipe:

https://food52.com/recipes/1945-jacinta-s-duck-rice-arroz-de-pato-da-jacinta#comments

Time consuming but delicious, and the first dish of the year that I would never have tried without this subreddit.

Week 3: Portuguese - Arroz de Pato by The_Lemon_Is_In_Play in 52weeksofcooking

[–]AllyYours 2 points3 points  (0 children)

How was it? I'm trying this later today. Which recipe did you follow? It surely does look tasty!

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Dark, rimmed and lined with parchment paper.

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Yes, that's why I suggested that, coupled with playing with the bake time. If their edges are getting too crispy, baking for a shorter time at a lower temperature should yield cookies with a more consistent texture throughout. At least that was my line of thought. :)

[A. Lange & Söhne] Flying Up and Down by Parkwaydrive in Watches

[–]AllyYours 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Beautiful. Do you coordinate your wedding band with your watch?

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

How long did you bake them? I baked mine for 12 minutes, and the edges were a nice golden color when I took them out, and then I let them cool completely on the baking sheets.

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Right? They're soooo good. And yours are making me want to make more for myself. Yummm.

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I'd try lowering the temperature to 350 and play with the baking time, checking doneness earlier than later. You're going to want them to cool on the baking sheets if you make them this big, though, so that the centers finish cooking.

That said, these cookies have a really wonderful texture and are not hard on the edges. They're crisp but still soft and easily breakable.

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Yeah, that's my pastry board. :) I can't wait to have nice countertops for rolling, but for now I make do!

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Thank you so much for the compliments. I hope you find the variation worthwhile!

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 11 points12 points  (0 children)

Me, too! The information they provide about how they arrived at their chosen recipes really gives me confidence to modify other recipes I come across, too.

My [22 F] bf [25 M] is a soldier, he wants me to marry him but I don't know if I could handle his potential deployment by [deleted] in relationships

[–]AllyYours 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You'll probably get more helpful replies at /r/usmilitarySO. I haven't been through a deployment yet, so I can't offer any insight into that. If you have strong communication skills and genuinely care about one another, I wouldn't let deployment alone end your relationship, but I wouldn't rush to get married without having experienced one either.

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 5 points6 points  (0 children)

I've tried pretty much every chocolate chip cookie variation I've come across, and these are definitely the best I've made. Perfect texture, perfect size. Definitely worth the extra time/effort to brown the butter and let the sugar/butter/egg mixture rest. The additional sprinkle of salt sounds great, and I'll be sure to try it next time. I hope these don't disappoint!

[homemade] Giant chocolate chip cookies by AllyYours in food

[–]AllyYours[S] 143 points144 points  (0 children)

Perfect Chocolate Chip Cookies From America's Test Kitchen

WHY THIS RECIPE WORKS

Our perfect chocolate chip cookie recipe had to produce a cookie that would be moist and chewy on the inside and crisp at the edges, with deep notes of toffee and butterscotch to balance its sweetness. Melting the butter gave us the chewiness we were looking for. Cutting back on the flour and eliminating an egg white also improved texture and brought the brown sugar flavor to the fore. To give our chocolate chip cookie recipe the crisp edges and toffee flavor we wanted, we let the sugar dissolve in the batter for 10 minutes, then baked the cookies at a high temperature so the edges darkened while the centers stayed soft.

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 ¾ cups unbleached all-purpose flour (8 3/4 ounces)
  • ½ teaspoon baking soda
  • 14 tablespoons unsalted butter (1 3/4 sticks)
  • ½ cup granulated sugar (3 1/2 ounces)
  • ¾ cups packed dark brown sugar (5 1/4 ounces) (see note)
  • 1 teaspoon table salt
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 large egg yolk
  • 1 ¼ cups semisweet chocolate chips or chunks
  • ¾ cup chopped pecans or walnuts, toasted (optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

MAKES 16 COOKIES

Avoid using a nonstick skillet to brown the butter; the dark color of the nonstick coating makes it difficult to gauge when the butter is browned. Use fresh, moist brown sugar instead of hardened brown sugar, which will make the cookies dry. This recipe works with light brown sugar, but the cookies will be less full-flavored.

  1. Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 375 degrees. Line 2 large (18- by 12-inch) baking sheets with parchment paper. Whisk flour and baking soda together in medium bowl; set aside.

  2. Heat 10 tablespoons butter in 10-inch skillet over medium-high heat until melted, about 2 minutes. Continue cooking, swirling pan constantly until butter is dark golden brown and has nutty aroma, 1 to 3 minutes. Remove skillet from heat and, using heatproof spatula, transfer browned butter to large heatproof bowl. Stir remaining 4 tablespoons butter into hot butter until completely melted.

  3. Add both sugars, salt, and vanilla to bowl with butter and whisk until fully incorporated. Add egg and yolk and whisk until mixture is smooth with no sugar lumps remaining, about 30 seconds. Let mixture stand 3 minutes, then whisk for 30 seconds. Repeat process of resting and whisking 2 more times until mixture is thick, smooth, and shiny. Using rubber spatula or wooden spoon, stir in flour mixture until just combined, about 1 minute. Stir in chocolate chips and nuts (if using), giving dough final stir to ensure no flour pockets remain.

  4. Divide dough into 16 portions, each about 3 tablespoons (or use #24 cookie scoop). Arrange 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheets, 8 dough balls per sheet. (Smaller baking sheets can be used, but will require 3 batches.)

  5. Bake cookies 1 tray at a time until cookies are golden brown and still puffy, and edges have begun to set but centers are still soft, 10 to 14 minutes, rotating baking sheet halfway through baking. Transfer baking sheet to wire rack; cool cookies completely before serving.