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J42S commented on a post in r/science
anonymouse5440 2 points

Probably not relevant to humans as we evolved eating WAY more fat than mice did.

This may not be true.

Meat consumption certainly played a role in human development -- there's no denying that -- but there's evidence that humans may have evolved eating a mostly vegetarian diet. Compared to mice -- some species of mice anyhow -- who regularly eat various species of insects, worms, and the remains of larger species, it's legitimately possible that mice evolved eating significantly more fat (as a percentage of their size) than humans.

J42S 3 points

http://www.scienceschool.usyd.edu.au/history/2009/media/lectures/4-brand-miller-chapter.pdf

See page 34-35

looking at the plant to animal proportion of 229 hunter gatherer societies the mean animal consumption was 68%. And there were 0% vegetarian societies, all were omnivore.

J42S 1 point

Abstract

Because serum magnesium does not reflect intracellular magnesium, the latter making up more than 99% of total body magnesium, most cases of magnesium deficiency are undiagnosed. Furthermore, because of chronic diseases, medications, decreases in food crop magnesium contents, and the availability of refined and processed foods, the vast majority of people in modern societies are at risk for magnesium deficiency. Certain individuals will need to supplement with magnesium in order to prevent suboptimal magnesium deficiency, especially if trying to obtain an optimal magnesium status to prevent chronic disease. Subclinical magnesium deficiency increases the risk of numerous types of cardiovascular disease, costs nations around the world an incalculable amount of healthcare costs and suffering, and should be considered a public health crisis. That an easy, cost-effective strategy exists to prevent and treat subclinical magnesium deficiency should provide an urgent call to action.

Moneybags99 5 points

Is there anything vitamin D doesn't help with?

J42S 2 points
J42S 1 point
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J42S commented on a post in r/AskReddit
Spoon75 2 points

Vit d3 5000 international units as i have really bad fatigue from m.s

J42S 1 point

Have you looked into the coimbra protocol ?

Spoon75 1 point

Not heard of that.

J42S 1 point
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Disturbed83 3 points

I think it is important to not go overboard with the d3 though (yes I feel its benefits aswell), 6months of 5k-10k iu, got me at triple the upper tollerable limit.

To anyone planning on using d3, make sure that if you are in the buildup phase to get blood drawn once every 2-3 months, once your at a good level switch to 500-2000iu daily as a maintenance dose.

J42S 1 point

Agreed. blood test should be used to figure out ones personal optimal dose.

J42S commented on a post in r/Supplements
J42S 2 points

This is the best guide i have found but general advice will always be suboptimal.

There is huge individual variability when it comes to dose response to vitamin-D. General advice on how much to take is going to be suboptimal for most people. One should really use blood tests to calibrate intake. Dose-response-curve

There are no studies that report toxicity at levels below a 25(OH)D serum level of 200 ng/ml (500 nmol/L), and no toxicity was observed in studies reporting a daily vitamin D intake below 30,000 IU. Vitamin-D toxicity

There are studies that suggest higher intake of vitamin-D are associated with better health than what is typically recommended. link

If your curious and want to learn more about Vitamin-D, I highly recommend this lecture:"D is for Debacle - The Crucial Story of Vitamin D and Human Health".

J42S commented on a post in r/Supplements
Skippyilove 8 points

That's very peculiar and you probably have some sort of major deficiency being exacerbated by the vitamin D. Maybe Vitamin A or K2 since they are relevant co-factors involved with Vitamin D. I seriously suspect this to be the case because vitamin D is replete with health benefits and should hold a place of honor in the supplements that you take.

J42S 5 points

In addition to A and K2 I think more Vitamin-D requires more Magnesium and many people are deficiant in magnesium. https://www.vitamindwiki.com/Overview+Magnesium+and+vitamin+D

Magnesium is essential for you to get the benefits of Vitamin D Vitamin D appears to consume Magnesium in at least two ways

1) Increased Vitamin D builds bones, which consumes Magnesium

2) Vitamin D metabolism uses Magnesium in 8 places

J42S commented on a post in r/Supplements
21
J42S 1 point

I have been trying to figure out the optimal intake of the different electrolytes(minerals) for some time but i havent quite figured it out as of yet.

I think Dr. James Dinicolantonio(author of the salt fix) recommends 3-6g Sodium. 4-8g Potassium, 0.4-1g magnesium, . I dont remembers his recommendations for the other electrolytes.

There are some reason to believe that its beneficial to have more potassium than sodium: Here is one study that show reduce heart and kidney disease link. A different study showing that dietary potassium regulates vascular calcification and arterial stiffness link

There are anecdotes of it fixing high blood presure and other benefits from a facebook group Optimal Ketogenic Living where higher intake of Potassium is pushed pretty hard.

Personaly i have tracked my food intake with Cronometer and found out i only got 60% of the daily recomende 4.7g of potassium. increasing it through supplementation of now foods Potassium citrate powder (1-2tsp/day) significantly reduced my salt craving. And decreased my tendency to need to go upp and pee during the night.

There is some pretty interesting critique of James evolutionary argument from Matthew Dalby. There is some Anthropological data suggesting that lower sodium higher potassium might be ideal.

My current take is that if one is low in both potassium and sodium increasing either or both will likely show benefits. But ideal is likley to have more potassium than sodium. Maybe they can perform somewhat similar roles...

GeoGrrrl 1 point

thanks for that! I've been taking a bit of extra potassium every now and then but don't want to take too much as I don't want to overdose as my GP won't test it for me. Thus I can only go with how I feel. 4-8gr potassium is quite a lot though, or do you mean potassium chloride or whatever type you use?

I'd certainly think that taking more salt seems to mean I'm holding more onto water. if this is what prevents peeing at night I don't know. But if uncontrolled excessive peeing every now and then gives me episodes of shortness of breath then this is at least a fix, though no explanation as to what's going on.

J42S 2 points

I think RDI for potassium is 4.7g. Think its not that uncommon for hunter gatherers to consume 10-20g. Check that facebook group if you want a deep dive in potassium. i wouldn't use chloride, we were unlikely to consume large amounts of chloride in the ancestral environment which makes it less likely that we are well adapted to it. citrate is the form which is found in vegetables. citrate supposedly have other benefits apart from the potassium bit. I haven't looked into that very much so take it with a grain of salt. Now foods potassium citrate powder is super cheap. start out with 1/8-1/4 tsp and if you feel like it increase every week to a maximum of 2 tsp. I feel weird if i down 1-2tsp in a single gulp so i put it in a water bottle with some himalayan salt and drink it during the first half of the day.

J42S commented on a post in r/Supplements
J42S 2 points

An interesting comment from a different thread about Vitamin-D: link

There is huge individual variability when it comes to dose response to vitamin-D. General advice on how much to take is going to be suboptimal for most people. One should really use blood tests to calibrate intake. Dose-response-curve: link

There are no studies that report toxicity at levels below a 25(OH)D serum level of 200 ng/ml (500 nmol/L), and no toxicity was observed in studies reporting a daily vitamin D intake below 30,000 IU. link

There are studies that suggest higher intake of vitamin-D are associated with better health than what is typically recommended. link

If your curious and want to learn more about Vitamin-D, I highly recommend this lecture: "D is for Debacle - The Crucial Story of Vitamin D and Human Health". Theres good reason to believe its very important for health and that most people are deficient. link

J42S commented on a post in r/suggestmeabook
J42S -1 points

You migth enjoy Harry potter and the methods of rationality. Its more morally grey, smarter and funnier than the original. and it happens to teach quite a bit of science. Imagine that harry is exceedingly smart like ender wiggins (enders game) but so is voldemort. There's a free ebook & podcast audiotheater version.

J42S commented on a post in r/AdvancedFitness
kaheil6 1 point

Please watch, "What the Health" documentary on Netflix and there is pretty extensive research that shows a plant base diet is far superior to having a ton of meat (chicken,pork,fish, etc). I am not sayin you have to be an all out vegan to be healthy, but making meat a rarity in your diet will keep you around much longer.

J42S 1 point
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