×

Achieving a large isosceles trapezoid - trying not to give up by ArrowRobber in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Drawings or pictures would help. If you are trying to do what i think you are trying to do, the answer is cut two sides on the bandsaw, then glue/tape the offcuts back on the block in order to cut the 3rd/4th sides,

Building a corner desk with this design. Looking for some thoughts on type of wood, grain direction, building plans etc. Thinking CA redwood. by LemonStream in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 4 points5 points  (0 children)

Edge banded plywood. Solid wood is almost impossible given the multiple grain directions you would have to have given the layout you have in ths picture.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo -1 points0 points  (0 children)

It's a lot easier to attach legs to an uneven piece of wood (especially with something like a trestle base) than it is to deal with a super thin slab. But again, not that helpful after the fact. I would still leave one side alone at this point, just to preserve as much thickness as possible.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 2 points3 points  (0 children)

If you are talking about a 2 x 2 piece of material, the only difference is looks. There is no structural difference at that point.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

That's a different question than what you asked. Face v edge grain is an esthetic choice for the most part. Face/edge v end grain is a completely different question. End grain is going to be substantially more involved build. Do you have access to a wide belt or drum sander?

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Not much you can do after the fact. That's pretty thin to start. I probably would have surfaced one side and left the other rough. At this point it depends on how much thickness you realistically have left and how dedicated you are to having it be a single piece. If you plane it too thin, you'll have to have an apron on to keep it in place, and that might not be enough. I guess it would depend on how many pieces you had to cut it into in order to get a good, flat section. You don't mention the width.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Do you mean 1 1/2"-2"? once you rip it down, it will only matter for aesthetics. It depends on how wide your walnut is and how the grain is running. As long as you pay attention and don't have flatsawn and riftsawn faces next to each other (which would look weird to a woodworker, but no one else would probably notice), it won't really make a difference.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 2 points3 points  (0 children)

It doesn't mean anything. Technically it means that the "frame", which in this case is the pieces that the legs bolt into, is made of hardwood. They describe it that way so that they don't have to say that the majority of it (the leg panels and the top) are made of some sort of composite with a veneer on top of it.

If you are looking for furniture made of solid wood, this is not it.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Depends on the size of your chainsaw, whether you want to invest in an alaska mill, and how patient you are. General rule is one year per inch of thickness for air drying. And you want to cut oversize, espcially if you are not experienced with a chainsaw mill. So do you have room to store drying lumber for 2-3 years?

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I can't speak to your options (I'm in the US), but the general quality of 9" bandsaws is going to be pretty low overall. They will be able to rip and miter thinner pieces of wood, but will struggle with anything over 1" and I would not count on a ton of accuracy. You are probably not going to get a finish cut off of a benchtop bandsaw.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Protecting them from damage and wear. Water will do bad things to untreated wood. Are you installing actual wood flooring or are you installing "wood flooring"

It cost a lot more than $50, and took a lot longer than 2 hours, but I finished my first project. I present to you the $50, 2-hour workbench. by timshead in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I run a hybrid shop (at least that's what I think it would be considered) and have held off on making a more hand tool focused bench by making some modifications to this bench. I have a thicker top with dog holes, 2 x 12 front apron with dog holes for work-holding, and use a Sjorberg benchtop workstation/bench hooks/shooting board for detail work. It is not a nicholson bench, but with a couple of hundred pounds of tools on it, its close enough to keep a new bench low on my list of priorities.

If I were running a full handtool shop, I would need something beefier, but using power tools for most of my stock breakdown/prep means that I generally don't need to hold work until it is at the detail stage.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Are you trying to maintain the look or just go for maximum protection? Epoxy is the sturdiest finish, but poly is easier to apply. Outdoor is only necessary if you are worrying about UV protection.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I keep 400 and 600 grit around, but don't generally sand between coats unless something has gone wrong. I will do a super light (like lightly drag the sanding block across the surface with no downward pressure) after the last coat just to smooth out any nubs. I will sometimes wax oil finishes, but this tends to be more with maloof style finishes for the look that it gives.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I brush water based poly (and don't get too finicky with it) and thin and wipe on oil based poly.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I recommend a good water based poly if you don't want it to yellow (oil based if you like the yellowing). I would use something better than polycyrlic. Minwax is kind of meh as far as finishes go and is generally harder to apply/get good results. I highly recommend general finishes high performance water based top coat in satin if you want something good and durable that does not yellow.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

You can probably find a formula for hide glue somewhere, which will probably be hide glue pellets and urea (unless you really want to go full organic and grind your own horse bones and pee). Finish is going to be tough unless you have a bunch of lac beetles around.

So you can make your own on both, but will basically be ordering the ingredients from suppliers and mixing them yourself. There are a lot of folks who mix their own hide glue (it has some properties, like being able to be disassembled, that are advantageous in certain builds) and folks who mix their own shellac (to control the cut), but I don't think I have seen anyone make their own from scratch.

It cost a lot more than $50, and took a lot longer than 2 hours, but I finished my first project. I present to you the $50, 2-hour workbench. by timshead in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 6 points7 points  (0 children)

Without getting too deep into federal statutory interpretation and court opinions, no. Simply etching something into a piece of ivory/baleen (like initials or a symbol) is not enough to take it from raw materials to native art/native handicraft. For etching, it needs to be more comprehensive, like the scrimshawed pieces that are pretty common for ivory art.

It cost a lot more than $50, and took a lot longer than 2 hours, but I finished my first project. I present to you the $50, 2-hour workbench. by timshead in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 4 points5 points  (0 children)

My sourcing is pretty direct. If it's not off of walrus I have been involved in hunting, I am buying it from family members who have harvested/beachcombed it themselves. It's pretty heavily restricted (for example I can't sell any raw materials to anyone who is not Alaskan Native), but being native and from a community where it is regularly harvested makes it easier. I come from a family that makes a lot of stuff from it. My grandfather and uncle both have made thousands of ivory handled ulus (which I am learning how to do, but have not yet mastered).

It cost a lot more than $50, and took a lot longer than 2 hours, but I finished my first project. I present to you the $50, 2-hour workbench. by timshead in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 9 points10 points  (0 children)

I'm Alaskan Native and most of my work incorporates some traditional materials. My jewelry has walrus ivory/fossilized walrus ivory/fossilized mastodon/mammoth ivory. My jewelry boxes use the same for pulls. My tables have fairly large bowhead whale baleen inlays. I do make stuff that is just wood, but I try to incorporate traditional materials wherever it makes sense from a design perspective.

It cost a lot more than $50, and took a lot longer than 2 hours, but I finished my first project. I present to you the $50, 2-hour workbench. by timshead in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 6 points7 points  (0 children)

Hit the front apron and (especially) the side aprons. It's pretty good at handling downward force, but any lateral load tends to make it shake side to side (at least mine does).

It cost a lot more than $50, and took a lot longer than 2 hours, but I finished my first project. I present to you the $50, 2-hour workbench. by timshead in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 26 points27 points  (0 children)

If you are going to use it for woodworking, particularly any hand tool woodworking, I reccomend relocating the tools on the pegs somewhere else.

If you want to test why, grab your mallet and give the bench a few good whacks from the front and the sides. Then imagine a project you have spent a few weeks on bring underneath those falling tools.

Video Series Recommendations by tripleduece249 in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 3 points4 points  (0 children)

The hand tool school by Shannon Rogers is very good