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How do you handle the Wild Magic Sorcerer? by LemonLord7 in dndnext

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

My group is very OP on magic items, so I let him take advantage on any roll to cause a surge the next time he casts a spell. I also use different effects tables, with the d513 table being the groups favorite. It's probably OP, but fits both the personality of the group and the effects of surges have probably driven 20-30% of taking the plot of the story in interesting directions over the campaign.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Do you mean end grain? There is not much difference between face and edge grain.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Depends what tools you have available. Matt Cremona just did a big waterfall table. Look at his instagram if you want to see how he did it.

Pocket hole haters respond by the_howlermonkey in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 11 points12 points  (0 children)

There are four different "nerves" that Ana White projects touch. One is tool/techniques based, one is materials based, one is style based and one is client management based.

1) tool/techniques. Pocket holes range from an ideal tool for certain applications (cranking out cabinets), a quick/easy if less elegant solution (aprons to legs instead of mortise and tenons), or something that causes problems (primarily breadboard ends and table top to apron connection). The objections here is not to their use, but the fact that people who want to use them should understand that they are not a replacement for all woodworking techniques and there are certain applications where they should not be used or they will cause problems.

2)materials. The problem with construction lumber is that it is not dry enough for furniture. All these plans skip the step that says "if you don't want your wood to shrink and cause gaps/problems, you need to let it dry from the 20-25% moisture content to the 8-12% that is ideal for making furniture". Construction and woodworking have different materials requirements. Do you know if any of the studs in your house are warped or cracked? Do you care? It's possible to use construction materials, but they should be properlydried first to prevent problems later. Wood drying after being built into furniture causes problems.

3)style. Rustic chic, especially when it involves some combination of bad technique and some sort of "distressed" finish (especially over actually nice wood) grates on people who really put a lot of thought into design. I often find myself saying things like "I'd never put it in my house, but it is well made" when regarding suck pieces. I think they (along with all the hairpin legs) will look super dated in a few years.

4) client management. You will run into problems anytime you get a pinterest/instagram photo and a client says "I want this" and does not instead say "I like this and need something this size, but properly constructed".

The line between frustration at bad techniques/dislike of a trendy style and hate is thin sometimes.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

No. I had a carvex that bent the first blade to hell upon making a test cut. My festool dealer took it back and gave me another without saying a word. Since they don't allow for lower listed prices on new tools, there is no reason not to buy from a reputable local dealer.

Seeking input & guidance on chuppah (wedding canopy) design by justtoprint in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You have no lateral support whatsoever, so this will only work if the surface you are putting it on is 100% level. If it is uneven at all (like natural ground and not a stage/dance floor/platform) I would not expect the joint to stay together.

That joint is not designed to be a knockdown joint, and I would not use it as such given the design that you are looking at.

Seeking input & guidance on chuppah (wedding canopy) design by justtoprint in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

What's your design? All you have posted is a picture of a joint. Its impossible to tell if the rest of the design is workable without seeing it.

Straight grained properly dried hardwood (so nothing that home depot carries). Making that a knockdown joint is going to require well dried stock.

Maybe? I usually start by using an existing design for projects I have not made before. Starting by trying to recreate the wheel on your own is generally a bad idea if you are not experienced at building stuff.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

If it were me, I would 1) check the moisture content 2) (assuming it was properly dried) rip it in half and remove the pith (probably 2 inches on either side of the pith) 3) surface both halves4) edge joint halves and 5) glue it back together (using dominos).

It sounds like you don't have the tools to undertake any of that, so absent telling you to see if you know someone with more tools, I'm not quite sure what to tell you. Trying to screw this down to a frame is very likely to make the cracks worse (given that it is not flat).

You have a piece of wood that is very far from "just screw it to a frame". I am going to guess that you bought it because it was super cheap compared to other slabs of that size? If so, the reason it was so cheap is because it needs a lot of work to get to ready to be used as a table condition.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Hard to say without knowing the moisture content of the piece, but those cracks go all the way through the piece. Glue won't hold it.

How are you planning on flattening it?

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

You got a piece of lumber that includes the pith, which is the most unstable part of the log. Most pieces that include that would have it cut out or would be discarded. If you really want this to be stable, the best thing you can do is cut the middle of the board out and reglue the two halves back together. There is almost nothing that you can do to stabilize the center of the log.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Everyones first projects are crap. Don't worry if you make something and its crap. Be proud of the fact that you finished! Then make it again. You will never make something perfectly the first time (despite what reddit posts may make you think). Making something and immediately making it again will yield a better result than spending twice as much time to try to make something perfect the first time.

I would recommend starting with making stuff for your shop. Then you can focus on functional, and as long as it is sturdy (even if it is ugly) it is a successfully completed project. As your confidence and you skills build, you can start to focus on more complicated builds.

The thing you rarely see from people who make beautiful things are the protoypes, early attempts, and failed versions of things. But everyone has them, its just that no one posts them/shows them off.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

What are you trying to accomplish by buying a hand plane? It is hard to make tool recommendations without knowing what operation you are trying to perform. General utility work? Smoothing? Surfacing lumber? Shooting end grain?

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 2 points3 points  (0 children)

The thin kerf will help. I run the forrest 40 tooth combo blade as my standard blade in my TS. I have a forrest 30 tooth ripping blade that I use if I am ripping a bunch of wood, but usually keep the combo blade in the saw. If all I was doing is ripping, I might go with the 30 tooth blade, but it is harder to make cross cuts/cutting plywood with the 30 tooth blade.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 2 points3 points  (0 children)

It will continue cracking. Its not outdoor plywood, so it will continue to deteriorate over time.

You can repaint it and accept the cracking, or get better materials if you want it to hold up better against the elements.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I would start over. You have to find a way to get weight on the center of the piece when you glue it up. When I glue up panels like that, I'll put 60-80 pounds of weight on the middle of the sheet (usually bags of rock salt, as thats what I have laying around) on the top.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

These are kind of mutually exclusive goals. The way to cover the screws is to make screw caps/buttons out of wood and glue them over the screw heads. But that will prevent disassembly. Screws are also not great for repeated assembly/disassembly. Something like cam-lock connectors are better suited for knock down furniture.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Either he is just screwing to the studs or he is opening the wall and adding the 2x4s cross members between the studs.

If I were doing this (as a 200ish pound person), I would open the wall and add some horizontal 2x4s between the studs to mount the piece to.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Hard to know without photos/a better description. If it were thin, its not an ideal use for machete.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Sounds like you may have overpromised and undercharged your client. Maybe you can glue some strips to premade doors and that will work, but that depends on 1) the clients expectations of what a "barn door" is and 2) whether a door that is 3/8-1" thicker than a standard door will fit into the door frames in question.

I generally don't sell anything I have not made before (and if I do, I expect to eat it on the cost/time most of the time).

I'm not in construction, so don't know much about residential building. Most doors, to my knowledge, are either solid core or hollow core depending on fire code. Almost all hardwood doors that have to go in a frame are done in the manner of the door I linked to above (frame and panel or rail and stile), because any other type of hardwood door construction does not stay square enough to stay flush to the frame.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You think I could just buy the basic door at Home Depot and add strips of wood to it for design?

Maybe, depends what the client thinks "barn doors" means and will accept.

Do you think I can cut and alter a pre made door?

Maybe, depends on whether you told her they would ride on rails in front of an opening or if you actually promised her that they would fit in the opening of a normal door.

Should I just build a door from scratch?

That's what I would do, but I am a "no half measures" kind of person. I would also refuse to build one from anything besides clear straight grained hardwood and charge appropriately.

I can’t get away with building the door 100% out of construction lumber because of weight and warping right?

I don't think you can build one without a frame without it warping, unless you are going to carefully grain select lumber out of a giant pile and then sit on it for a few months and make sure it does not warp while drying. If you have weight restrictions (because of hardware or something else), you haven't mentioned it so I don't know.

Weekly Quick Questions, Wood ID, and Deal or No Deal /r/Woodworking Megathread by AutoModerator in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Yeah, you can resaw and glue/nail thinner wood to get the look you want. If I were to go that route I would probably shoot for 3/8" or so, which is thick enough to give you edges between the boards but thin enough that wood movement shouldn't be a problem. The X pattern really does not do anything in this case.

The reason that barn doors have cross members is primarily for side hanging doors. The angled support helps keep a square frame that is being held on one side from slowly pulling out of square. That is also why the angled pieces are always symmetrical on a set of doors (since they are hung on opposite sides). If you are top hanging something that lateral force is not really an issue.

Brand new woodworker, my first cutting board by blakavar in woodworking

[–]Juskimo 1 point2 points  (0 children)

They tend to explode. tear out in long grain = a chunk of wood comes out. Tear out in end grain = the board cracks into several different pieces in a spectacular fashion.