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2

Hi all,

I'm trying to make a switch into SWE and I was wondering if it's better for me to do a second bachelor's or a masters in CS. I have a Bachelors and Master's in Aerospace Engineering and have been working for about a year. I have taken a few basic CS classes in my undergrad and have made programs for data analysis (mostly Matlab and some Python). If I go the Master's route I was thinking about taking a DS&A (maybe also architecture) undergrad class then doing OMSCS. However, I know this is more geared for CS students, and I'm afraid that I'll be missing important things and/or it will be incredibly difficult for me. Also, if it helps, I might be transitioning into a SWE/Data job within my company. What are your thoughts? 

2
16 comments

BSE Aerospace here. Just finished my last class in OMSCS - about to graduate. Some stuff was hard in the beginning. I took AI my first semester and I found that challenging, but there was a lot I was comfortable with. You can do it!

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Original Poster1 point · 23 days ago

That gives me a lot of hope! What CS background did you have beforehand (ie classes/experience)?

ME BS here and working on MS in systems engineering along with this program.

Brush up and algo and data structure. If you want to just have it help AE, you would probably focus on embedded controls. If you are interested in career change, you could transition to other things here. What is your plan? Does this degree fit into it?

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Original Poster1 point · 28 days ago

I wanted to make a transition away from AE and go solely into SWE. Looking into becoming a back end developer or doing something in AI/ML

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0

Hi all,

I know this question has been asked a few times before, but I'm trying to make a switch into SWE and I was wondering if it's better for me to do a second bachelor's or a masters in CS. I have a Bachelors and Master's in Aerospace Engineering and have been working for about a year. I have taken a few basic CS classes in my undergrad and have made programs for data analysis (mostly Matlab and some Python). If I go the Master's route I was thinking about taking a DS&A (maybe also architecture) undergrad class then doing OMSCS. However, I know this is more geared for CS students, and I'm afraid that I'll be missing important things and/or it will be incredibly difficult for me. Also, if it helps, I might be transitioning into a SWE/Data job within my company. What are your thoughts? 

0
3 comments

Hey I am in the same position. I did my bachelor's in Materials Engineering and now doing my masters in CS. I chose masters because I didn't want to be in school too long and my program is geared towards people who are making the switch like me. I also took classes in undergrad so it's not like I was coming in with 0 familiarity. I chose my uni based on the career fair and it's networking power

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Original Poster1 point · 28 days ago

If you don't mind me asking, what classes did you take in Undergrad? And what school are you going to now? I know USC had something for Engineers trying to transition, but it's $75,000

1

Hi all,

I accidentally blew out the pilot light for my gas fireplace without knowing what it was. Is this an issue? Will the gas keep coming out or will it stop?

1
3 comments

For me, it was definitely attending a coding bootcamp. Completely changed my life and career. Still wish I’d completed my CS major though.

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What was your career and education like before the boot camp?

7

Hi all,

I hope this is an appropriate question for this subreddit, but I am trying to take an online course in Data Structures and Algorithms that is taught in Java (an undergraduate course at University of Illinois - Springfield, to be more exact). Would you have any feel of how knowledgeable I would have to be in Java to take such a course? Would I be able to take a few MOOCs and be alright? Or would it be recommended to take the pre-reqs in Java courses?

For more background, I graduated my Bachelor's and Master's in Aerospace engineering, and took a couple of CS courses during my time there. I mostly used Matlab while there for my non-CS courses, and have done data analysis in Matlab for my job this past year, but have also used some Python and a little bit C++ in the past. I am trying to apply for the OMSCS program to do a Master's in CS. And recently I have been self-teaching Python.

Any insight would be helpful, thank you!

7
12 comments
2 points · 1 month ago · edited 1 month ago

I graduated from UIS' undergraduate degree program. The two-part MOOC from the University of Helsinki is sufficient Java for the DSA course at UIS. But it would benefit you to have some familiarity with Discrete Math, or some experience with formal proofs.

Some math will hit you pretty quickly. But I think an engineering math background is more than enough. :-p

I also went through the OMSCS program at Georgia Tech. Two Java courses plus a DSA course is not sufficient for Georgia Tech's program. The coursework is significantly more difficult than your average undergraduate CS curriculum.

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Original Poster1 point · 1 month ago

Ok, thank you for your suggestion, I'll have to look into that MOOC!

Yeah, I have taken quite a few courses in math, so I'm pretty confident in that area, although I may have to brush up in some areas.

That has been something I have been thinking about. Do you have any suggestions on how to better prepare for it? I'm assuming experience would be a good way to prepare? I am currently applying for some data analyst positions that seem to heavily use Python and SQL. Do you think a year or two in a position like that might give me the background to do OMSCS?

A year or two in a real job is the best thing you can do.

But to do that i would assume (hope) they will ask you algo/ds questions in the interview so prepare well. Tbh nothing beats (in my opinion) trying to do the algorithm problems on leetcode, and researching the problem as you do them

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Original Poster1 point · 1 month ago

According to Glassdoor reviews the interview questions are more about statistics and probability. I think that's because for data analysts, programming is more of a tool than the objective. I just think this would be a good entry into (relatively) more higher level programming for me, since I have data analytics experience, but it's not the main role at my current job. But I may be wrong about all of that.

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1

Hi all,

I hope this is an appropriate question for this subreddit, but I am trying to take an online course in Data Structures and Algorithms that is taught in Java (an undergraduate course at University of Illinois - Springfield, to be more exact). Would you have any feel of how knowledgeable I would have to be in Java to take such a course? Would I be able to take a few MOOCs and be alright? Or would it be recommended to take the pre-reqs in Java courses?

For more background, I graduated my Bachelor's and Master's in Aerospace engineering, and took a couple of CS courses during my time there. I mostly used Matlab while there for my non-CS courses, and have done data analysis in Matlab for my job this past year, but have also used some Python and a little bit C++ in the past. I am trying to apply for the OMSCS program to do a Master's in CS. And recently I have been self-teaching Python.

Any insight would be helpful, thank you!

1
16 comments
3 points · 1 month ago

Master's degree courses typically don't do a lot of hand-holding. If the course is taught in Java, you should be fairly proficient in Java already. I.E. you should know how to create, compile, and run a simple Java console application, know the Java library to some degree, etc.

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Original Poster2 points · 1 month ago

Sorry, I should have clarified, the data structures and algorithms course is an undergraduate course. I'm trying to take it before applying to a Master's program.

If your course is anything like mine was, it will be fairly simple. Data Structures and Algorithms was a sophomore year course at my school. It started out slow going over the most basic structures, arrays. You will move on to Linked Lists, Stacks, Trees, and the last structure we looked at were Heaps (I don't remember if that is all of them).

This course should also introduce you to Generics, which allows an abstract type to operate on a method or object instance.

As far as CS courses go, I would say difficulty is a 4/10, mild programming knowledge required.

The concepts you will learn here are pretty important though.

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Original Poster1 point · 1 month ago

Ok! Thank you for your input!

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1 point · 2 months ago · edited 2 months ago

Academic Goals: MS in CS, specializing in ML

Career Goals: To develop programs for post processing data or go into Data Science/ML with applications in Engineering, then in the future potentially switch into SWE.

Academic History: BS and MS in Aerospace Engineering with a 3.66 and 3.93/4.00 GPA, respectively, from a Big 10 college.

Math Courses: Calc 1-3, Diff Eq. 1&2, Linear Algrebra, Intro Stats, Grad level math class

CS Courses: 2 intro level CS classes. One used C++, the other was more algorithms and didn't program.

Other Courses: Computational Fluid Dynamics course that was heavy on numerical methods. Also, I have taken an optimization course.

Professional Experience: Have been working at a Aerospace company for a year as a Development Engineer. Part of my task has been developing a post processing program in Matlab for high frequency pressure data. I have also used Python in a previous company for a similar purpose, but with a smaller scope.

I'm also looking to switch into a data analyst position soon, but probably after applying.

Programming Languages: Matlab (4/5), Python (2/5), C++ (1/5)

Personal Projects: Currently taking a MOOC in python. Have done small web scraping programs in Python.

Volunteer Work: Not related to programming, but tutoring under privileged children (don't know if this helps at all)

Awards: None

Additional Comments: How will my experience in Matlab be seen? I know it's not a "real" programming language but will it help at all? I am also taking a MOOC in python to try to become proficient at it.

In addition, I have not taken a strict Data Structures & Algorithms course. How much will this hurt me? If so, does anyone know a good place I can take this online? Would it be enough to self study?

You're pretty well qualified. Matlab programming is legit programming, especially in ML world. You're going to need to get proficient in Python, C, or similar as well though.

To the extent you haven't taken Data Structures/Algorithms, I'd say your MS in Engineering kind of makes up for it, at least in terms of admissions. I'll repeat advice I gave to someone else on this thread: Borrow a copy of Algorithms by Dasgupta, Papadimitriou, and Vazirani, which is the text for the required GA course. Skim through it. You'll probably go, "Hey, this is easy compared to Computational Fluid Dynamics." But maybe not, in which case some studying up is in order.

BTW: look into taking Intro to High Performance Computing as one of your electives. If you like optimization and numerical methods, imagine getting graded on how fast your program runs :-)

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Thank you for your input and advice! I'm going to apply for Spring 2019, and then study DSA this fall, and will take a look at the book you recommended!

Hi all,

I have a question about data analyst positions.

My end goal is to get into a data science/ML position. Currently, I am in the Aerospace Industry as a Development Engineer after having done a Bachelor and Master's in Aerospace Engineering. Recently, I've been considering going into a data analyst position before going into data science. My main fear is that a data analyst position won't be technically challenging enough and that I'll be doing repetitive tasks for the majority of my job. Does anyone have experience with this? Would this be a good idea, or should I try going directly into data science after self studying?

Thanks in advance!

Hi all,

I was wondering if I could get your opinion on my plan.

Goal: - Data science job in the Aerospace industry in a year/year and a half

Background:

  • BS & MS in Aerospace Engineering
  • Currently have a job in the Aerospace Industry (for about a year now)
  • Math courses: Calc 1-3, Diff Eq 1&2, Linear Algebra, Intro Statistics Class, Optimization course
  • Proficient in Matlab and familiar with Python and C (trying to focus on learning python right now)
  • 2 intro level computer science courses

Plan:

  • 1) Stanford Lagunita Statistical Learning & edX Intro to CS and Programming using Python
  • 2) Read through Elements of Statistical Learning & Review Linear Algebra
  • 3) Udemy Python for Data Science and Machine Learning & Data Structures and Algorithms
  • 4) SQL class & Personal Projects
  • 5) Digging deeper into ML and Statistics

Questions:

  • Are there any additional steps that I need to take, or steps that are unnecessary (such as reading Elements of Statistical learning or doing a class in DSA)?
  • Is there a good place to take a DSA online course? I've looked into Oregon State Bacc and UI Springfield, but they seem to be in Java and require pre reqs. I was thinking just watching MIT videos?
  • Is my timeline too ambitious?
  • Would it be more worth it to go back to school? (I was thinking maybe Georgia Tech online CS masters)
  • Any other notes/comments?

Thanks in advance!

Just out of curiosity... what sort of DS position are you hoping to get in the aerospace industry? I am in a position very similar to yours (BS/MS, currently working in aerospace, seeking a move to data science) but from what I can tell there aren't really many DS-related positions in the industry.

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Honestly, I'm not to sure about the type of data/analysis I would be doing at an aerospace company, but I know that I've seen a few openings at some aerospace companies, such as Northrop Grumman or Raytheon. For example the Northrop Grumman one was to look at military personnel data. I just figured that it would be easier to switch within the industry regardless of the actual work, even if it's not dealing with engineering. If there aren't enough openings in the aerospace sector, I'm going to look into the engineering sector, and after that, just data science positions in general.

0

Hi all,

If I have a data set and I am trying to create a logistic regression for an output Y = 0 or 1, where the predictor X is a continuous variable, how do I calculate the value P(Y=1 | X=x)?

I know that if X is categorical, then for each category, I take the number of points where Y = 1, and divide it by the total points of that category, but is there a way to do this for a continuous X?

Thank you in advance!

0
15 comments

You mean once you have the coefficients?

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Original Poster1 point · 3 months ago

I guess what I was asking how the coefficients are calculated.

So that's a different question than what you previously asked:

How did you calculate the probability for each point in the dataset?

I guess maybe I don't understand what you mean by "probability" here.

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Original Poster1 point · 3 months ago

My understanding was that you needed to the probability of each point in the data set to be able to calculate the coefficients, since ln ( P(Y=1 | X=x) / ( 1- P(Y=1 | X=x) ) = B0 + B1 * X. But I guess that's not true and that the parameters are estimated based on maximum likelihood?

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1 point · 3 months ago · edited 3 months ago

Hi all,

What are your/employer's opinions on Harvard Extension online classes? I'm currently trying to find a way to take an online course in Data Structures and Algorithms. I've looked at UIS and Oregon State Bacc and I may not be able to take them, as UIS requires two semesters of Java, and OSU doesn't offer the class to non-degree students. Are there any other options?

I was thinking I could study Java in the summer (as I really only know Matlab and am self teaching python) or just reading a book about Data Structures and Algorithms since I heard it's independent of programming language.

Thanks in advance!

SoW is great! They work so so hard to provide assistance to the kids. I couldn't recommend them more. Allison, one of the instructors, is amazing.

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Original Poster1 point · 4 months ago

Have you volunteered with them before?

I am currently an aerospace engineer and am quickly finding out that I do not like a lot of parts about being an engineer. I'm starting to realize that my favorite part about engineering has been coding, looking at data, whether analytical or experimental, and analyzing trends and finding the cause of these trends, so I'm looking to make a switch into data science.

As a background on myself, I have a Bachelor's and Master's in Aerospace Engineering and have been working at an Aerospace company for a year since I've graduated. Because of this I was thinking about making the switch to data science within the industry. I would say that I am intermediate/proficient in Matlab, and I am familiar with python and C++, with a solid background in calculus/differential equations, but only 1 class in linear algebra and and 1 class for stats (which, as I understand, are major parts of data science), and have also taken a class in optimization. I have used Matlab in the past to reduce, calculate, and graph post test data in various ways.

Now my actual question: is it worth going back to school to get a Master's in data science/data analytics/computer science/statistics? My plan was to teach myself python and statistics, doing personal/side projects, and hopefully be able to land a job in data science within the Aerospace Industry. But, in your opinion, would this be enough to make myself a desirable candidate? I'm assuming that the college route would be a more sure-fire way of getting into the field, but I am trying to see how much of an advantage it gives me to see if it is worth it.

If you think it's possible for me to self teach, is 1 to 1.5 years too optimistic of a timeline? If you feel that it is worth going back to school, which degree would you recommend? What I've heard is that a data analytics/science major is a relatively new degree, and so employers may be hesitant to hire candidates with that degree. I was also looking into computer science or statistics, but it seems that data science is a combination of these two, so I was unsure which I would choose, although I think I would lean more towards statistics.

Thanks in advance!

I don't mind at all. I was in computational fluid dynamics in my past life, so I have always been heavy in computer science and algorithms. As I learned about data science, I became enamored and decided I wanted to make the change. I went through a couple online certificate programs (data mining at UCSD and the data science career track program through Springboard) to learn the required skills. I went through the Springboard program because it was focused on practical applications, an area the UCSD program was lacking.

I recommend building up a portfolio of projects to display your skills. That is always recommended, but I imagine it's even more important for those like us that take unusual routes to data science. I hope that helps. Let me know if I can answer any additional questions.

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Ah I see. Yeah, I haven't really gotten into CFD unfortunately, I stayed more on the analysishttps://www.reddit.com/design side, and I'm currently at my first job as a production engineer and I don't really like it. However, I've done post test processing of large data and am pretty proficient in matlab, so I'm hoping that helps a bit. My current plan was to self teach python/statistics/data science, build a portfolio and then start applying to jobs within the Aerospace industry since I figure that would be the easiest way to make the transition. Thank you for those sites/programs, I'm going to look into them!

A couple more questions that I had: What was your education background(e.g BS, MS, Ph.D)? And when you made the switch, did you stay in the Aerospace industry or move to another industry?

You're welcome. The UCSD program looks slightly different than when I took it, but I found them both rewarding. I have a MS in aerospace engineering and switched from a private defense company to a government defense job.

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Ok, thank you so much for your help and replies!

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2

Hi all,

This is probably a really simple question, but I was having trouble finding the answer. In some of the examples I have been seeing, there are "%" symbols in the function inputs and I can't find out what they are used for.

Ex1.

regex = re.compile('[%s]' % re.escape(string.punctuation))

Ex2.

quizFile = open('capitalsquiz%s.txt' % (quizNum + 1), 'w')

Purpose of Example 1 is to use regex to get rid of all punctuation in a string, and the purpose of Example 2 is to create different files for various quiz numbers.

Thanks in advance!

2
6 comments
Original Poster1 point · 4 months ago

Oh ok, I see how it works now. Thank you!!

1

Hi all,

I am having issues getting the reversed cards to appear. I downloaded a deck ("Korean Vocabulary by Evita"), which only has the Korean-to-English cards; however, I would also like the reverse. I went to "Manage Note Types" then to "Korean Vocab" then "Edit Cards" and added a second card type which had English-to-Korean. When I go to "Card Browser" I can see that the English-to-Korean cards exists for all cards. And in the "Deck Options" I unchecked the "Bury Related Cards" for both "New Cards" and "Reviews". However, I still have not seen an English-to-Korean Card even after going through ~75 cards.

Is there a way to make the English-to-Korean cards appear more often? I would like to have them appear relatively close to their Korean-to-English counter part.

1
6 comments

AnkiDroid won't display the required information. Use the desktop version.


AnkiDroid: Sidebar - Card Browser - Select Deck in DropDown - Search

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Original Poster1 point · 5 months ago

Oh ok, if I do it on the desktop version, will it also change the cards on AnkiDroid?

It will, assuming you have an AnkiWeb account set up and sync both sides.

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Original Poster1 point · 5 months ago

Ok, thank you so much!! I also found this youtube video about it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DnbKwHEQ1mA&yt%3Acc=on

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Re manned: You're right, that's an important upcoming hurdle, but it's not like the stuff is vaporware. Dragon has flown a number of times and the rocket has flown dozens of times. There's little reason to think they'll hit a brick wall.

Re cargo size: They just demoed their Falcon Heavy, which is largely the same tech as the rest of their fleet. Again, I'm sure there'll be some kinks, but no reason to think they'll hit a brick wall.

Re decades: Who cares? This isn't some pissing contest about whose engineers are better. We get to use 21st century tech and we're better off for it. Yay!

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In regards to manned flight, the rocket and dragon have flown multiple times, but it still has to be human rated which may mean additional inspection and maintenance after each launch. And also, like u/helix400 said, there are significantly more quality checks and controls when it comes to hunan rated flight. It's definitely not a brick wall, but it may slow down production, and the amount of launchs. Also, don't forget about the two recent failures the rocket has had. I still believe that they will have a higher manned launch rate than the space shuttle, though, and will be significantly cheaper.

Original Poster3 points · 6 months ago

Our relationship is still pretty new and we like to see each other during the week. Switching to a weekend-only mode is what worries me.

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It is worrying, but if you work together doing a long distance relationship, I'm sure you guys can make it work. Also, jobs aren't permanent, you could take this job and if things start to get really serious about your relationship (not saying it isn't now), then you can always move back, or find a compromise in a year or so. From the sounds of it, it sounds like you might regret not giving the move a shot. And again it is worrying but, in my opinion and experience, things in the future are more worrying and scary then they actually are when you actually get there.

But this is just my opinion from the information I know and there is no right or wrong answer when it comes to these decisions, just what you think is best for you.

Original Poster2 points · 6 months ago

You bring a good amount of wisdom in this conversation.. I think I made up my mind to go up north but don't have the balls to actually do it. Fear of the unknown bla bla bla..

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Thank you, I appreciate it! Yeah, it's understandable to be afraid, especially at this point in your life. The way I see it, make what you feel is the best choice and do your best, and then the rest is out of your control, and there is no point in worrying over what you can't control. And mistakes might happen, but that's just part of life, you made the choice that you thought was best, and all we can do is to move on, learn from them and not to dwell on them and beat yourself up over it. I hope that made sense/made things better instead of worse haha.

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1

Hi all!

I'm sure that this has probably been answered, but I couldn't find the solution for my issue. I downloaded a card set (Korean Vocabulary by Evita) on my Android phone, but it only came with cards in one direction (Front: Korean; Back: English). I want to add the reverse to the deck. The posts that I have read before said to change the cards type from "Basic" to "Basic (and reversed)", but I can't find how to do that on Android. In addition, will I lose the progress that I have already made? Also, does Anki usually keep the basic and reversed cards together? Like if I learn the basic card, will it show me the reversed around the same time?

Thanks in advance!

1
3 comments
2 points · 6 months ago

Edit the note type. Add the second card type. It should automatically be reversed. If it isn't, reversing it is pretty straightforward. You won't lose progress, but you will have to learn a bunch of the reversed cards for the words you already leant.

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Original Poster1 point · 6 months ago

I got it to work!! Thank you! Also, is there a way to just focus on the second card type so that I can catch up to the first?

2

Hi guys!

I am looking for a new 2-in-1 laptop, I have attached the questionnaire below in case you would rather read that. I am in college, looking for a new laptop. I currently have a Lenovo Y500, but it's a little to heavy for me (almost 6 lbs). I am looking for a 2-in-1 laptop because I want to start taking notes on it, as well as my usual schoolwork (Matlab) and play League of Legends in my downtime (Low Settings minimum, Medium preferable, 60fps).

I have been looking at the HP Spectre x360 as well as the Lenovo Thinkpad Yoga series, but I wanted to get your guys' opinions on those two (such as if they can run LoL, I heard the Spectre overheats playing it, and the Yoga might not be able to play it) and any other options that you might think are better, or if there are going to be any releases in the near future. Thanks in advance!

LAPTOP QUESTIONNAIRE

  • Country of purchase: United States

  • Budget range: Preferably under $1000, but willing to go to $1600

  • Purpose (netbook, ultraportable, mainstream, gaming, desktop replacement, etc.): 2-in-1 laptop to take notes, schoolwork, and light gaming

  • Screen size preference: anything between 12-15"

  • OS preference (Windows/Mac/Linux): Windows

  • Gaming requirements (list example games and desired fps/settings): League of Legends at a low to medium level at 60fps

  • Other performance requirements (video editing, CAD, etc.): Matlab, Potentially some use of CAD

  • Portability requirements (constantly carried, frequently moved, mostly stationary, etc.): I am in college, so I would like to be able to carry it without too much difficulty. Under 4 pounds is preferable.

Which of the following qualities would you prefer? (Choose one or two)

  • Long battery life -vs- Low weight -vs- High performance: Low weight, then long battery life

  • Build quality -vs- Low price: Not really sure

List any critical features: Touchscreen

2
9 comments

Depends on how intense of CAD you will be doing.

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Original Poster1 point · 2 years ago

I'm not actually sure if I will be using my laptop for CAD, I might end up using a school desktop. So if I take out the CAD requirement, then an i5 should be able to run LoL smoothly?

Yes, it will run League easily.

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Original Poster1 point · 2 years ago

Ok, thank you!

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Are you going to college? Because if you are then it's a fresh start for you and you can learn from all of your high school mistakes! If not, you're still moving on to a new part of your life and the same thing applies, you can still learn from your mistakes!

Original Poster1 point · 3 years ago

Exactly what I'm thinking but it just makes me sad that high school wasn't what I imagined it would be. Making friends is easy but I took that too literally and did nothing.

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Hindsight is 20/20, we look back at things and think that it could have been so much better, but sometimes we over think it to the point where it's more fantasy than alternate reality. Not saying that it couldn't have been better, I'm just saying that if you're anything like me, you think that everything would have been perfect if it would have turned out differently.

Score hidden · 3 years ago

I don't need any advice but only well wishes. I'm starting to study for my drivers permit test. My anxiety has prevented me from driving until now and I think I'm ready.

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Good Luck!!!! :)

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