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Does the wage gap actually exist? What is the argument that is made? by DrGubbies in Ask_Politics

[–]Yosarian2 5 points6 points  (0 children)

It's worth mentioning though that even if you remove all lifestyle and career effects and just compare people in the same field with the same experience and education working in the same field, there is still a wage gap between male and female employees, although it is smaller.

2020 CLP Democratic Primary Poll Round 2 by EverySingleImage in centerleftpolitics

[–]Yosarian2 3 points4 points  (0 children)

The Rock, Mark Cuban, and Oprah all need to get off that list first. No more celebrities.

TIL that Students at John Hopkins University collaboratively decided to opt out of their final since the professor set his curve based on the highest score grading it as 100%. They chose to receive a score of zero making it the highest grade, thereby getting 100% by [deleted] in todayilearned

[–]Yosarian2 0 points1 point  (0 children)

It's a prisoner's dillema, though. Those are really hard to solve in game theory. If no one defects, then everyone wins, but if someone else defects, then you'd better defect too.

It worked here because they could wait and observe that no one else was defecting, but if you didn't have any way to monitory the other students (say, he told everyone to take the test on their computers sometime in the next 24 hours) there's no way it would have worked.

This week, Microsoft founder Bill Gates announced the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation would invest $1 billion in the fight against malaria. by mvea in Health

[–]Yosarian2 19 points20 points  (0 children)

What happened with them? This happened:

http://www.who.int/malaria/media/world-malaria-report-2016/en/

Between 2010 and 2015, malaria incidence rates (new malaria cases) fell by 21% globally and in the African Region. During this same period, malaria mortality rates fell by an estimated 29% globally and by 31% in the African Region.

And, according to that report, the biggest reason that they've had so much success is because:

ITNs are the cornerstone of malaria prevention efforts, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Over the last 5 years, the use of treated nets in the region has increased significantly: in 2015, an estimated 53% of the population at risk slept under a treated net compared to 30% in 2010. Other regions have achieved impressive reductions in their malaria burden. Since 2010, the malaria mortality rate declined by 58% in the Western Pacific Region, by 46% in the South-East Asia Region, by 37% in the Region of the Americas and by 6% in the Eastern Mediterranean Region. In 2015, the European Region was malaria-free: all 53 countries in the region reported at least 1 year of zero locally-acquired cases of malaria.

What is the importance of the Nunes memos? by 376820 in Ask_Politics

[–]Yosarian2 7 points8 points  (0 children)

especially without disclosing the source to the court.

They did, actually; that was just another factually untrue claim in the Nunes memo. In reality the FBI did disclose the that the the Steele dossier was partly paid for by a political entity when they made the application to the FISA court.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/justice-dept-told-court-of-sources-political-bias-in-request-to-wiretap-ex-trump-campaign-aide-officials-say/2018/02/02/caecfa86-0852-11e8-8777-2a059f168dd2_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.1d6862b6bb27

Senate confirms a homophobic climate change denier with no scientific credentials to lead NASA by Philo1927 in progressive

[–]Yosarian2 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I think you're assuming the pattern of the last 20 years will repeat forever, but it doesn't have to. It's not always true that the two parties are almost exactly balanced; Democrats dominated all three branches of govnerment almost nonstop for basically the entire 40 year period from FDR through Nixon. (The only exception was Ike and he was basically a liberal anyway). If we play our cards right, keep together a successful governing coalition that gets things done after the clusterfuck of Trump, and undo the gerrymandering and voting ID BS, we might be able to do the same thing again.

Trump is /our guy/ by AnimeJanetYellen in dirtbagcenter

[–]Yosarian2 2 points3 points  (0 children)

By the same logic, we could nuke Russia, or we could nuke China, so let's just take the centrist point of view and nuke Mongolia because that's in the middle.

Don't Rush Fragile States Toward Democracy - Western countries think they know how to make fragile states work better. They mostly get it wrong. by Monkey_Paralysed in neoliberal

[–]Yosarian2 2 points3 points  (0 children)

China has a lot of unusual features to be sure; it's just that the example of China makes me a lot less confident then I used to be that just improving stability and legitimacy and building institutions inevitably leads to democracy.

Don't Rush Fragile States Toward Democracy - Western countries think they know how to make fragile states work better. They mostly get it wrong. by Monkey_Paralysed in neoliberal

[–]Yosarian2 4 points5 points  (0 children)

But what if you help root out corruption, build institutions, make the state more stable and legitimate, and then democracy just never happens? What if you just create another China-type stable authoritarian state? Plus once that happens you might not be able to ever push them towards democracy, once they become a stable authoritarian state.

[Serious] What is the most disrespectful thing a guest ever did in your home? by Yellow-B in AskReddit

[–]Yosarian2 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Gave my dog a piece of chocolate. And then argued with me when I told them to not do that.

The direction that common core math is taking by coreynj in mildlyinfuriating

[–]Yosarian2 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Another problem, honestly, is that if history is any guide, they'll get rid of this and put something completely different in 5 years from now. Education fads come and go too quickly, imho, and usually they seem to get thrown away just as teachers start to get decent at teaching that way.

The Disappearing Right to Earn a Living: Want to become a florist in Louisiana? A home-entertainment installer in Connecticut? Or a barber anywhere? You’re going to need a license for that—and it’s going to cost you. by hitbyacar1 in neoliberal

[–]Yosarian2 5 points6 points  (0 children)

In health care I agree with you. Maybe in child care as well you could make a case for government subsidies.

But what I'm talking about isn't so much a market failure, it's cases where regulation sets a floor price of something to a level where a lot of poor people simply can't afford it. That's not a market failure because it's caused by government policy which sets minimum standards for how good a service can be (licensing for barbershops is a good example of this).

So in a case like that, would poor people be better off if they could choose a cheaper (but probably substandard) less regulated option for whatever service then if they had no options at all? I'm honestly not sure.

The Disappearing Right to Earn a Living: Want to become a florist in Louisiana? A home-entertainment installer in Connecticut? Or a barber anywhere? You’re going to need a license for that—and it’s going to cost you. by hitbyacar1 in neoliberal

[–]Yosarian2 5 points6 points  (0 children)

The closest thing I've seen to that was an argument that, any time regulation pushes the price of something up to a point where poor people can't afford a necessary service anymore, then it should be legal for poor people who can't afford that service to buy a less regulated or unregulated version. The idea being that maybe regulation is good for middle class people if it ensures safe products, but if it makes daycare or medicine or whatever totally unavailable for the poor then it's actually hurting the poor.

Not 100% sure I buy that idea, it's easy to see ways it can go wrong, but you can at least make an argument for something like that.

Russian Disinformation on Reddit is Underway. by Spiralyst in esist

[–]Yosarian2 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Ok, what votes did he make that you disagree with?

Russian Disinformation on Reddit is Underway. by Spiralyst in esist

[–]Yosarian2 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Doug Jones actually took progressive positions; surprisingly so for Alabama. I can't see how you could possibly call him anti-LGBQ for example, this was his position:

Jones has criticized the Trump administration for withdrawing guidelines for schools on the treatment of transgender students and for banning transgender people from serving in the military.

"Doug Jones supports equality, unlike Roy Moore, who believes it is perfectly acceptable to discriminate against people, which would destroy businesses and opportunities for the people of this state. Roy Moore's extreme and controversial views backfired in North Carolina and cost that state and its businesses tens of millions of dollars. That's why business leaders disagree with Moore's extreme views, which are outside of the mainstream," Jones' campaign said in a statement when attacked by Moore for supporting transgender rights.

Source: https://www.cnn.com/2017/11/27/politics/doug-jones-on-the-issues/index.html

I really can't imagine where you're getting this from.

SB-827 failed in California, but there’s still no good alternative to building more housing by DanFromBurgerKing in neoliberal

[–]Yosarian2 0 points1 point  (0 children)

That makes it more complicated but shouldn't change the overall effect, I think. Maybe Michigan will trade with Ohio and Ohio will trade with California, doesn't really matter in the end.

SB-827 failed in California, but there’s still no good alternative to building more housing by DanFromBurgerKing in neoliberal

[–]Yosarian2 1 point2 points  (0 children)

There is basically always some kind of comparative advantage even if there isn't an absolute advantage. It's unlikely that California is just 30% better at EVERYTHING in an exactly proportional way compared to Michigan, instead of, say, 40% better at one thing while only being 20% better at something else.

Donald "Unprotected Sex with Porn Stars" Trump announces abstinence-focused overhaul of teen pregnancy program. by imagepoem in esist

[–]Yosarian2 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Yeah, Republican policies like this were always stupid, but it's especially laughable when it's Trump pushing it. At least someone else might be able to say "people should just only have sex within the bounds of marriage" and at least we might think that he believes it.

Russian Disinformation on Reddit is Underway. by Spiralyst in esist

[–]Yosarian2 2 points3 points  (0 children)

That's fair. Every time I've gone there though, I've seen focus on inter-party fights, primary elections, attacks on other democrats for being insufficiently pure, attacks on the DNC, ect. That's not even necessarily always an inherently bad thing but I really feel like it's the wrong focus right now.

New evidence found in the Cohen raid by Motiv81 in PoliticalHumor

[–]Yosarian2 0 points1 point  (0 children)

And now Rudi Giuliani is going to be one of Trump's defense lawyers on the Russia case.

Is any of this making sense to anyone else?

The End of the Democratic Century by 1amathrowaway in neoliberal

[–]Yosarian2 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Sure, it has positive effects like that, but I still think that we could spend significantly less and still have the level of power to protect allies and deter serious threats. And in the long run, what really is the basis for military power (especially long-term power in times of relative peace) is your economic base and your technology. Any time in history a great power feels like it starts to fall behind in economics and technology and then tries to compensate by building a larger military, it's just the first step of a slow downwards spiral.

Not that I think the US is there right now, we still do have an economy large enough to support the level of military spending we're doing, but in the longer run if the US keeps putting a higher percentage of GDP into defense then any of the nations it economically competes against I think it will tend to fall behind.

Poll: white evangelical support for Trump is at an all-time high by DanFromBurgerKing in neoliberal

[–]Yosarian2 12 points13 points  (0 children)

I think my favorite meme about this was something like:

"A few years ago I never would have believed that my president would be having sex with porn stars and would want to create a Space Force, and that despite that I would STILL hate him!"

Southern Poverty Law Center Deletes List of 'Anti-Muslim' Extremists by Sir-Matilda in neoliberal

[–]Yosarian2 3 points4 points  (0 children)

I'm fine with criticizing Islamic ideas and trying to convince people to question some of the harmful beliefs they've basically taken on faith. But I think there's a hard line between that and actually criticizing Muslims as people, or generalizing certain harmful behaviors as "something that all Muslims do" even when it's generally not true.

It's especially dangerous right now. And a lot of the Muslim stereotypes, even those that have some truth in Islamic countries, simply do not apply to most Muslims who choose to live in a country like the US.

Plus, anything that increases tribalism or pushes a "us-against-them" mindset tends to just make people more extreme in their beliefs and less likely to do question anything in a way that "goes against their tribe".