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ELI5: Is there a proper way to blow your nose? I never feel like I get everything cleared out. by Zpheldin in explainlikeimfive

[–]buried_treasure[M] [score hidden]  (0 children)

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ELI5: Why do older Americans, especially those who are retired, seem to like driving bigger cars like Cadillacs or Continentals? I'm assuming they weren't driving them when they were younger. What takes place? by [deleted] in explainlikeimfive

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ELI5: How does one become a town crier in england? by Imwhite007 in explainlikeimfive

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Dual citizens, how do you fly? by artesen in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure -1 points0 points  (0 children)

And similarly, the UK government requires that you enter and leave the UK on a UK passport if you have one (even if you have another country's passport as well).

Dual citizens, how do you fly? by artesen in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 17 points18 points  (0 children)

No, it's exactly what you MUST do. Both the US and the UK governments require their citizens to use their own country's passports for entry/exit, even if you're a dual citizen. My wife's in exactly the same position.

Look on it as a bonus in that it saves you standing in a mile-long immigration queue at either end!

NHS Immigration Price Increase by Opalineteardrops in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 0 points1 point  (0 children)

You could ask on /r/ukvisa, someone there *might* have a better idea, but the chances are unless someone works high up in the Home Office then the details are just not yet known.

How do local elections work, and what are they for? by wdiwdwml in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 19 points20 points  (0 children)

It has nothing to do with who your local MP is.

The local elections are for your council, which (depending on where you are in the country) may be a Borough council, a Town council, or a County council.

You vote for a councillor or councillors to represent your very local area, known as a ward. This is an area of usually just a few thousand households, so the councillor will be there to sort out local problems.

Much like with MPs, many people vote for a councillor from a specific party that they support, and whichever party has the most councillors on a council gets to set policies. It's perfectly possible (and not that unusual) for the council in an area to be controlled by a different party to that which the local MP belongs to.

Councils are responsble for things like how frequently the rubbish is collected, road repairs and development, where new houses and other developments occur, sometimes they can affect public transport policy, and they also run and regulate schools, social services, care homes, and other work.

Do posh men love wearing bizarrely-coloured clothing? And why? by organonxii in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 20 points21 points  (0 children)

He definitely seems a far happier chappy when he's pottering around the world being the country's highest-paid trainspotter, compared to when he was John Major's Defence Secretary and chanting "Who Dares, Wins" at Tory Party conference!

If the UK was involved in a war with a home front, what would a 21st century home front look like? by pingusbeak in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 0 points1 point  (0 children)

the transition would be hugely challenging

As was the transition from peacetime economy to war footing for civilians in 1939. We have the benefit of hindsight and history and know what conditions during the war were like in the UK and for how long the war and the Blitz and so on would continue.

Imagine suddenly being thrown into that; the majority of men under 40 simply disappearing from their jobs, women (most of whom in those days were expected to be housewives or teachers) suddenly having to be trained to do everything from long-distance lorry drivers to industrial factory workers.

In the 1930s the UK, much like today, imported 60% of its food. Suddenly the ports were closed and shipping was being sunk and we had to find the capacity to produce all of our own food.

The home front during the war was a major, major challenge for both government and civilians. The idea that it was just the same as what people were doing before but with rationing, gas masks, and evacuees, couldn't be further from the truth.

If the UK was involved in a war with a home front, what would a 21st century home front look like? by pingusbeak in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Electrical power stations -- and Coronation Street! -- do pre-date the age of the internet and mobile phones, though. Prior to the 21st century the peak-time demand was communicated to the power station staff using the good old medium of landline phones. And quite frequently by simply having a TV in the power station's control room so they can see for themselves when the adverts start.

If the UK was involved in a war with a home front, what would a 21st century home front look like? by pingusbeak in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 19 points20 points  (0 children)

Every single thing you mention happened in 1939, too. Literally every single one, from gaming ration books to marching against the war to refusing to accept evacuees. The blackout was only widely observed after people started being put into prison for not taking it seriously.

Wars on the scale of the Second World War quickly change a society at quite a fundamental level.

I miss Manchester so much... by AlainBashung in manchester

[–]buried_treasure 12 points13 points  (0 children)

Some are born here

Some are drawn here

But we all call it home

The whole of Longfella's This Is The Place is an amazing ode to Manchester, but your post reminded be of the those lines in particular.

When looking at recently built structures. The bricks are of different type and colour below the Damp proof course. Why? by 5footbanana in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 15 points16 points  (0 children)

They're probably engineering bricks, which are much denser than normal bricks. That gives them extra load-bearing capabilities (useful when they're supporting the entire weight of the house) and better resistance to damp and frost (useful when they're below the DPC).

The reason they don't make the entire house out of engineering bricks is simply cost -- they're considerably more expensive than standard masonry bricks.

Proper way to drink tea? by Greggulator in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Not one of those hot water taps. They’re shit.

At work a few years ago they refurbished the kitchens, took away the kettles, and installed those hot water taps. They are indeed, as you so elegantly put it, shit. There's no way to make a decent cup of tea with water that comes out of them because it's almost-but-not-quite boiling.

ELI5: Why is it necessary to add ingredients (primarily flour) when baking at an altitude of 5,000 feet or more? by tastemyfinger89 in explainlikeimfive

[–]buried_treasure[M] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

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Where in the hell are all these MASSIVE spiders and dotty bugs coming from? by [deleted] in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 9 points10 points  (0 children)

The weather's got warmer, so all the insects are either hatching or scurrying out of whatever little holes they hid in during the winter.

If you think there's a lot of insects in London you don't ever want to live in the countryside.

Canadian married to UK citizen (by ancestry); Can I work at a University in UK? by JamesVirani in ukvisa

[–]buried_treasure 1 point2 points  (0 children)

There is no flexibility. The requirement is to have "cash savings" of that amount.

The intention is that you could amply prove you can support yourself even if something unexpected occurs, which means that money tied up in illiquid assets isn't what they're interested in.

By "gifts" they mean it's fine to show that the origin of the money came from someone else (for example a relative) as a gift, as long as it's clear the money is actually yours permanently, and has not just been temporarily loaned to you.

What are black and white relations like in UK relative to America? by dielawn87 in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 62 points63 points  (0 children)

One of the main differences is why black people came to the countries in the first place.

In the US, obviously, most black Americans' ancestors arrived unwillingly, as slaves. In the UK, although there had been very small black communities here for centuries, the majority of black Britons trace their families' arrival in this country back to the late 1940s and 1950s. This is when Britain, desperate for labour to help rebuild after the Second World War, invited people from Britain's Caribbean islands to come to live and work in the UK to run public services, in particular the newly-formed NHS. And so many tens of thousands of people arrived over a period of 5-10 years, forming the nucleus of today's black populations in the UK.

These people are known as the Windrush generation, based on the name of the first ship bringing them here. And although it would be lying to say they never faced racism or discrimination, it has never been anything like as widespread or systematic as in the US, especially the pre-civil-rights Southern states.

(Of course the reason there were black people in Jamaica, Trinidad, and other British islands in the first place was historically due to slavery, but the levels of indirection involved mean that the valid burning anger that some black Americans have felt hasn't been much in existence in the UK).

Should I refrigerate my eggs? by beboola in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 0 points1 point  (0 children)

That's why they have that chlorinated chicken that they want to sell us after Brexit. Their chickens are so diseased and germ-ridden that unless they're washed in a detergent as powerful as chlorine, they are literally so much of a health hazard that they're unfit for human consumption.

Are there any items from the US that you wish were common in the UK? by The_butt_fox in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Serves the bugger right for just putting the "you were out" card through the letterbox without even ringing the doorbell, if you ask me.

Are there any items from the US that you wish were common in the UK? by The_butt_fox in AskUK

[–]buried_treasure 5 points6 points  (0 children)

Cheap Fender guitars

Assuming you mean actual Fender brand, and not Squier, are they actually significantly cheaper in the US?

ELI5: Why do cars travel in packs on the highway, even when there are no traffic stops to create groups? by DeNooYah in explainlikeimfive

[–]buried_treasure[M] -2 points-1 points  (0 children)

While a link can be a very helpful part of providing a useful explanation, a top-level comment consisting of a link with no other explanatory text is not useful and is against ELI5 rules. So it's been removed.

ELI5: Why do cars travel in packs on the highway, even when there are no traffic stops to create groups? by DeNooYah in explainlikeimfive

[–]buried_treasure[M] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Rule 1 of ELI5, and our most important rule, states "Be nice. Always be respectful, civil, polite, calm, and friendly. ELI5 was established as a forum for people to ask and answer questions without fear of judgment".

Please try to respect this rule above all others in the future.

ELI5: Why do cars travel in packs on the highway, even when there are no traffic stops to create groups? by DeNooYah in explainlikeimfive

[–]buried_treasure[M] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Your comment was removed because it was in breach of Rule 3: "Top-level comments (replies directly to OP) are restricted to explanations or additional on-topic questions. No joke only replies."