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Hi there!

I'm suspecting my Baratza Virtuoso is grinding way too coarse.

I recently got some really stellar Yirgacheffe from Coffee Collective in Copenhagen, and I got them to grind a little coffee for reference. To replicate this grind, I've had to grind as fine as 13. This is for Kalita Wave, by the way.

Normally Kalita Wave is recommended to be ground around setting 18-20, with V60 at 15. I've found that from grind setting 20 and upwards, the particle size becomes more and more inconsistent, and the reference grind for French Press beyond the point of usable grind (28 is basically a mix of everything between fines and half-centimeter sized flakes).

I've checked the excellent calibration videos from Baratza, and it doesn't seem like there's anything wrong with my grinder per se, other than the fact that I can't rely on any external references.

2
10 comments
1 point · 5 days ago

That doesn't sound right. My virtuoso grinds fairly consistently all the way up to setting 40. I use 32 for chemex and it works perfectly well. Check that your upper Burr holder isn't cracked or missing any tabs. You can also try to adjust the calibration of the machine. There's tutorials on YouTube on how to do that.

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Original Poster1 point · 5 days ago

Thank you! I really have a feeling that something is off.

I’ll try to grind some leftover beans in intervals, to show how bad it is.

Could it just be that the reference guide you got was too fine??

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Original Poster1 point · 6 days ago

No, it tastes absolutely wonderful when brewed like that.

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I poured water in my grinder instead of the kettle once.

More recently, I forgot to discard the water I had used to rinse the filter, and got myself almost a liter of very diluted coffee.

I would pay for this just as I would pay for useful software in general.

For me, the lack of commercially backed, stable software was actually what turned me away from Linux on the desktop long ago.

If I have time to do it properly, I’d write requirements and make sure they were thorough and future-proof, then I’d invite every potential vendor and have them do a PoC lab for me. Depending on the outcome, I’d go with my gut feeling (assuming the PoC went well).

Then I’d spend time automating everything from the start, aiming for platform independence in my automation, so this thing doesn’t happen again.

If I’d be in a hurry, seeing as my network burned down and my customers ought to be very angry, I’d have an entirely different problem, and I’d go for whomever could deliver on very short notice.

So I recently moved to the same city as my long-distance partner, but due to uninteresting facts, I had to find my own place.

As an introvert it is so nice being truly alone once in a while. My girlfriend is obviously around quite often, but being completely alone once in a while has done me very well.

This is going to be tricky, I'm sure, but I'm looking for a keyboard I can use on my mac in the office. This, I'm afraid means the following:

  • Silent switches
  • Either a fixed eject key (I need this to lock it with ctrl-shift-eject), or the ability to program a key to do this
  • Small form factor - I don't need a num pad, but I need at least the escape-key and the F-row.
  • I would like to be able to buy it in either Europe or preferably the Nordics.

There are commercially available options, like the Matias Quiet Pro or Das Keyboard Mac edition, but I find those a bit too expensive.

All help is absolutely appreciated.

2 points · 2 months ago · edited 2 months ago

Custom-built KBD75 from KBDFans. Super compact, has all the keys you need and is fully programmable. They assemble it for you too and ship to europe.

Being a custom means any switches are available so you can pick Aliaz (silent tactile) or any other silent variation they might have in stock.

EDIT: The Vortex Race 3 also comes with Silent Reds https://mechanicalkeyboards.com/shop/index.php?l=product_detail&p=3917 but you need to look into if the programmability it has covers you.

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Thank you, I will look in to getting a custom built one.

One thing, and one thing only: An actual balance between imps and reps that can shift in one's favor and affect the world.

By affect I don't mean another in-game currency, but like zones being accessible, gradually as the balance shifts with unique perks for the winning side.

6/4/2018: MSRC responded with a note that the severity of the issue is below the bar for servicing and that the case will be closed.

So, Microsoft introduces a new file format that allows arbitrary execution even when loaded from the internet, and some how don't find this problematic?

I generally don't like QoS for a number of reasons. Let me try to go through them (I work in and talk from a standpoint of a service provider):

1) QoS is often a poor substitute for available bandwidth

You absolutely need QoS if you have a deficit of available bandwidth and that lack of bandwidth causes drops that affect your applications. This works for both connection-oriented and connection-less, as drops in TCP are detrimental to the experience, and drops in real-time packets are often either audible or visible depending on the application.

However, all this is generally solved by having enough bandwidth. If you have 100G of internet capacity, and your links are <100g individually, your microbursts even won't be a problem.

2) QoS is unreasonably complicated, and defaults are bad

One Juniper SE once said to a room full of engineers that JUNOS had pretty good QoS defaults. The room promptly burst out in laughter.

It is not a controversial statement that QoS has a lot of settings, a number of differentiating queuing and dropping strategies and enough knobs to make any implementation really complicated.

This is even further complicated by every single platform having a different level of support for these, a different amount of buffers, and more caveats than platform choices.

3) QoS is hop-by-hop and end-to-end is almost never consistent

If you end up implementing QoS, it needs to be implemented end-to-end, but everything needs to be thought out as per-hop. This sounds easy if you control all links yourself, however that MPLS link you bought from another provider, is that really transparent? Does it behave like your own network, or does it do something completely different with your DiffServ-tagged traffic?

4) QoS is non-trivial to monitor

Have you ever attempted to dynamically graph your QoS queues? If so, you know that it is pretty hard - most vendor MIBs are pretty hard to implement - streaming telemetry promises to solve this, but this remains to be seen.

4) QoS is non-trivial to monitor

Have you ever attempted to dynamically graph your QoS queues? If so, you know that it is pretty hard - most vendor MIBs are pretty hard to implement - streaming telemetry promises to solve this, but this remains to be seen.

This...holy fuck this. "Oh we don't support QoS monitoring in the mib, just run these diagnostic Commands to see live stats"

...Umm...Wtf mate.

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Exactly. It's pretty dangerous to implement something that affects every traffic flow greatly, and not being able to monitor it.

4 points · 2 months ago

Kan du vise til noen konkrete produkter som har slik prisdifferanse mellom Norge og Danmark?

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Vin, øl, sprit. Men det var vist ikke det der blev ment her ;)

2 points · 2 months ago

Dette er ikke produkter nordmenn har adgang til å bestille over nett

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Ja, det er jeg klar over. :)

I can wholeheartedly recommend NIPAP.

It is efficient, has full feature parity between IPv4 and IPv6, and a great API.

Now it doesn’t have many of the good to have features you mentioned, but it is easy to write small scripts to use with the API.

I for example wrote a DNS exporter for it, and that wasn’t terribly hard.

When the children of my friends start showing up on facebook's list of suggested friends.

You can generally anycast anything running statelessly, so I guess it's possible.

So this would work unless you need your collectors to have all the data, and in that case, anycasting is a bad idea.

Oh man. I remember when I arrived in Beijing many years ago and it was a warm summer day.

I went to a local convenience store and wanted an ice cream, and asked the guy behind the desk which one he could recommend. I ended getting one with a green packaging and to my dismay I discovered that it was pea-flavored. Quite a disappointment.

I will try to answer your question a bit on the factual side, and I will obviously miss a lot of nuances and details:

Entering politics is hugely different depending on where you are based, and my gut feeling is that it's much, much easier to enter European politics than say US politics, and this would obviously be much much easier than entering, say Chinese politics.

This comment is written from a European/Scandinavian point of view.

In at least European politics it's all about the party. If you want to have a career in European politics, you need to be an active and contributing member of a party. Obviously, there's more of a career to be had if the party is one that has seats at the governing bodies, but those parties also have a lot of members who are working hard to gain foothold. Smaller parties have fewer members, but also fewer seats to be filled.

You can obviously be politically active in all sorts of other organisations, but that's not so much "entering politics".

In order to gain footing within a party, you would need to be skilled in a number of areas which of course can be taught or learned by doing them:

  • Have a thorough understanding of how state and civil society works.
  • Know how to work with people and make deals. Learning how to compromise and negotiate.
  • Have a sense of vision, e.g. how would your ideal society look, what steps should you take to get there, what's wrong with current policy.
  • Etc.

So, become a party member, go to the meetings, try to be part of the debates and discussions. If you work hard, and people like your work, there's a chance that you can try to position yourself to be put on the list of people up for election eventually.

This will be hard work, but if you like politics, it might also be a lot of fun.

Argh, det der guld-show på toppen irriterer mig, når resten er i blåt/sølv.

Ellers er den rimelig sej.

Having lunch. I'm getting hungry.

Reactos is my favorite OS that I will never run.

I predict that some day ReactOS will be instrumental in saving us from out-of-support legacy maintenance hell.

To be honest, I doubt it. It's easier to virtualize and isolate old Windows and know your software will work, than it'd be testing compatibility with this clone, which is, I'm afraid not getting enough attention by devs as it requires.

By the way there are factories where the machinery still is operated by old PCs running Windows XP. And since they're not networked, they run just fine and will run for as long as the hardware lasts.

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Perhaps now, yes. But imagine being forced to keep a certain application alive and having the choice between unsupported, unpatched legacy Windows, or maintained ReactOS with frequent security updates?

Or imagine having to perform data recovery on old software. Having a modern ReactOS machine that has new tools as well as a solid compatibility layer to old legacy stuff that wouldn't otherwise run would be quite a life saver I imagine.

Perhaps now, yes. But imagine being forced to keep a certain application alive and having the choice between unsupported, unpatched legacy Windows, or maintained ReactOS with frequent security updates?

I already told you what I personally would choose. I'd use Windows. I'd lock it down and isolate it in a VM, and not put it on the open Internet, or if I have to put it on the Internet, I'll isolate it from the infrastructure and try to make it stateless (i.e. where I run a task, obtain results, then reset to original state).

You make a very big assumption that ReactOS will ever be 1:1 to Windows, and it'll be receiving "frequent security updates". What is this hope based on? This project has been around for 20 years and they can't even hit version 1 yet. And this is not just the authors being humble. It's actually full of Windows software that doesn't install, run, or run reliably on ReactOS.

I'm very very impressed by their efforts and I wish them all the luck in the world, but it's blatantly clear this project doesn't have the resources to truly succeed in its mission. And so, no, I wouldn't use it. I'd just use old Windows.

Having a modern ReactOS machine that has new tools as well as a solid compatibility layer to old legacy stuff that wouldn't otherwise run would be quite a life saver I imagine.

Once again, assuming ReactOS will magically support all hardware from new to old, that even Microsoft can't support with its vast resources is just completely unwarranted.

On top of that the entire hardware industry is helping Microsoft write and debug drivers. Are they helping ReactOS? No. So how is that great support of old hardware supposed to happen? It won't.

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I think there's a much bigger chance that an open source project will make efforts towards getting old things to work out of the personal interests of the developers and users, whereas microsoft will do its best to end support of older software and hardware stacks, because that's baggage and technical debt for them.

Yes, I'm making assumptions on a lot of things, and you might be absolutely right. However I do believe that in the future a lot of legacy hardware and software will be kept alive by initiatives such as this.

You make a very big assumption that ReactOS will ever be 1:1 to Windows, and it'll be receiving "frequent security updates". What is this hope based on? This project has been around for 20 years and they can't even hit version 1 yet. And this is not just the authors being humble. It's actually full of Windows software that doesn't install, run, or run reliably on ReactOS.

First of all, reaching version 1.0 might not even be something they are actively looking for - a lot of software projects are like this, working in a perpetual state of being in development. Furthermore, it doesn't need to run every piece of windows software there is. But take Wine as an example - Wine runs a lot of old software very well, but a lot of stuff barely starts, and it reached version 1.0 a good while ago.

Does ReactOS need to be a drop-in Windows replacement to be a success? Absolutely not. However, if it can be installed and that old irreplaceable enterprise software that was last updated 25 years ago runs on it, on that PC I bought only a few years ago, it could actually be quite the success.

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Did Peter Dun forget to close his trousers?

Playing around with the technology but nothing planned as of now. It also might not be implemented in the iPhone, could end up in the iPad. Also 2020 release is not accurate.

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I’m thinking if they did it for the iPad, they could install like a physical keyboard on one half of it, maybe a touchpad too!

Wait, that’s called a laptop...

I got a CD with redhat linux 5.2 from a computer magazine in the late 90's. My PC was lacking at the time, so I got better performance out of it than whatever Windows we ran at that time.

I just open it in a buffer and do M-x eval-buffer. Simple and fast.

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