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I love Jazz, can I get some recommendations? by Symbolic_Plague in Jazz

[–]jardeon 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Art Blakey's Moanin', from the Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers album; in particular, listen to how Lee Morgan passes the solo to Benny Golson; Golson picks up Morgan's ending pattern and repeats it to begin his own solo. That's the kind of communication and collaboration between combo members that really exemplifies the art form.

Tips for cropping before printing? by Bankster88 in fujix

[–]jardeon 1 point2 points  (0 children)

5x7 will preserve more of the image relative to the original, compared to 4x5 (8x10). You can always pre-check the crop yourself in Lightroom, Photoshop, or any other image editing program, just set the marquee selection tool to either 5x7 or 4x5 to see what areas of the photo would be excluded in a print.

I haven't used Mpix directly, but they're just the consumer arm of Miller's Professional Imaging. I've been very happy with what I've received from Miller's in the past.

Records concerning the NROL-76 logo • MuckRock by thisguyeric in spacex

[–]jardeon 3 points4 points  (0 children)

The followup comes on page 64: "For question 1, the short answer is that SpaceX can declare a successful launch after we have verified the vehicle is in its proper orbit. I believe this should come as a joint discussion between the program office and OSL/NOPS.

I'm hesitant to give SpaceX an exact time, but we could coordinate with you two on day of launch and let you know that we're in a nominal flight path and have achieved first contact with the SV."

Records concerning the NROL-76 logo • MuckRock by thisguyeric in spacex

[–]jardeon 5 points6 points  (0 children)

Around page 41, could be my favorite part: "At what time after liftoff can SpaceX (and then NRO public affairs declare a "successful launch" of NROL-76? This will be the time when we issue press releases. The standard practice for ULA launches is to choose a time that appears random or arbitrary, but is after payload separation. The OSL mission director usually approves the proposed time (This is because OSL does not consider a launch a success until the payload reaches orbit. However, NROL-76 is different, being a commercial launch, with delivery on orbit, so I don't know what OSL would determine or approve the time."

SpaceX Zuma launch & landing captured on film with a 40-year-old SLR in a single image. by Mseeley1 in spacex

[–]jardeon 2 points3 points  (0 children)

The shuttle pictures aren't mine (sadly) but were taken by Carleton Bailie, who has shot for Boeing, NASA, and others. He had shared those photos a few years ago, which was what ignited my interest in trying to field a film camera for remote shots.

I need to restock my film supplies anyhow, I might pick up a couple of rolls of Cinestill 50Daylight and see how it does. I'm also (like you) waiting to see what happens with Ektachrome.

SpaceX Zuma launch & landing captured on film with a 40-year-old SLR in a single image. by Mseeley1 in spacex

[–]jardeon 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I don't want to start really enjoying a stock to have it only get discontinued (thanks a lot, Fuji...). Acros, for example.

I still miss Fuji NPC160. It's like a hole in my heart.

I had it in my head that Cinestill was prohibitively expensive, but maybe I'm thinking of something different. I'm also still gun shy about motion picture filmstock from back in the Seattle Filmworks days (yes, I'm that old).

I haven't yet tried shooting launches on slide film, mostly because the guys I'm emulating were shooting Shuttle launches on reversal film, and I want to see if I can match that style before moving on to something different.

SpaceX Zuma launch & landing captured on film with a 40-year-old SLR in a single image. by Mseeley1 in spacex

[–]jardeon 2 points3 points  (0 children)

Granted, Mike's use case is different than mine; he's shooting long exposures from farther away; the film cameras I've fielded have been placed a few hundred feet from the rocket, so I generally need to expose for 1/500 or faster shutter speed to avoid the rocket's exhaust from shaking the camera to the point that the image is blurred.

I was using Portra 400 for my nighttime shots (and some daytime, when it was the only thing in my bag), it wasn't terrible, but on the whole I just felt like it wasn't suited for the crazy colors and exposures that go with a launch.

Portra 400, day launch

Ektar 100, day launch

Portra 400, night launch

Portra 400, night launch

SpaceX Zuma launch & landing captured on film with a 40-year-old SLR in a single image. by Mseeley1 in spacex

[–]jardeon 1 point2 points  (0 children)

I've used Ektar for most of my daytime launches and I've been very happy with the results.

I'm a little more shy about using it for nighttime because I generally want higher ISO at the launchpad for those, to ensure I avoid camera motion shake.

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launches and lands in this 472-second single frame photo from Michael Seeley / We Report Space [1280x1920] by jardeon in ExposurePorn

[–]jardeon[S] 0 points1 point  (0 children)

The photo was taken by a friend and colleague of mine, but I can answer most of your questions, as he gave me the details when he sent me the file to post.

The camera and lens were a Canon 7Dmk2, and a 10mm wide angle. The exposure was ISO100, f/18 and 472 seconds. No ND filter was needed, at night, an 8 minute exposure at f/18 would be almost completely blacked out, so the rocket and any directly visible light source (such as the lights along the shore) would be the only things that show up.

Mike has shot a Falcon 9 launch and landing from this location three times: Orbcomm OG2-M2 in 2015 (two photo composite); SpaceX CRS-9 in 2016 (single frame 483 second exposure) and the above photo from 2018.

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launches and lands in this 472-second single frame photo from Michael Seeley / We Report Space [1280x1920] by jardeon in ExposurePorn

[–]jardeon[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Mostly; the blue streaks in the upper right are star trails, not the exhaust from the rocket. I think the first stage follows a "loopier" path on boostback, without the hard turn at the top of the arc.

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launches and lands in this 472-second single frame photo from Michael Seeley / We Report Space [1280x1920] by jardeon in ExposurePorn

[–]jardeon[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

If you zoom in on the second stage burn, the arc continues downrange to the right, the boostback is the "hook" shape lifting upwards and left from the second stage.

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launches and lands in this 472-second single frame photo from Michael Seeley / We Report Space [1280x1920] by jardeon in ExposurePorn

[–]jardeon[S] 1 point2 points  (0 children)

The first stage booster doesn't perform a full orbit; the second stage and payload separate from it after 2.5 minutes. The first stage boosts back to an altitude of 250km, and lands back at the launch site (well, a few miles down the road on the same property) about 8 minutes after liftoff.

NROL-47 on fire before launch? Is that normal? by APX808 in spaceflight

[–]jardeon 1 point2 points  (0 children)

While they're firing, it's unlikely; but prior to their being ignited, the tanks are kept topped off, and there could be some leakage then.

NROL-47 on fire before launch? Is that normal? by APX808 in spaceflight

[–]jardeon 0 points1 point  (0 children)

As absurd as it looks, yes :)

Hydrogen-fueled engines were and continue to be a huge concern for human-rated spacecraft; if the Space Shuttle did not have the sparklers, the excess hydrogen could accumulate around the rocket and ignite around the astronauts in the event they had to evacuate the spacecraft. While they're incredibly efficient, they carry a unique set of challenges not faced by rockets that use RP-1 (refined kerosene) and liquid oxygen.

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket launches and lands in this 472-second single frame photo from Michael Seeley / We Report Space [1280x1920] by jardeon in ExposurePorn

[–]jardeon[S] 15 points16 points  (0 children)

You've basically got it!

The arc on the left is liftoff, the first stage of the rocket carrying the payload off the ground.

That arc ends about 2.5 minutes in flight, as the main engine shuts down (the transition from yellow to red to blue). The second stage of the rocket separates and ignites, while the first stage pitches around and relights its engines to put it on a trajectory back towards Cape Canaveral (the bluish hook near the top of the arc).

The second stage is using just one engine, while the first stage uses nine, plus it's farther away, so its streak appears fainter.

That "boostback" by the first stage is the first of three burns that ultimately end with the landing.

The vertical pillar near the top is the second burn, the "re-entry" burn, which slows the rocket down from supersonic speeds to ensure it doesn't break apart when re-entering the thicker portions of the Earth's atmosphere. In this picture, you can actually see the transition points where the rocket was using one, then three, then finally one engine again, note on that vertical pillar where it gets thicker near the middle and thinner at the ends. The rocket is traveling "top to bottom" in the photo.

The pillar on the right is the landing burn, the third and final time the engines are re-lit on the first stage, as the rocket touches down gently at LZ-1, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

And yes, the other, fainter lines are star trails, recorded for nearly eight minutes while the shutter was open.

Please divert your course 15 degrees to the North to avoid a collision by Anakeen in CitiesSkylines

[–]jardeon 5 points6 points  (0 children)

Exactly right :)

For posterity, here's the version that appears in Sled Driver:

I'll always remember a certain radio exchange that occurred one day as Walt and I were screaming across southern California 13 miles high. We were monitoring various radio transmissions from other aircraft as we entered Los Angeles Center's airspace. Though they didn't really control us, they did monitor our movement across their scope. I heard a Cessna ask for a readout of its groundspeed. "90 knots," Center replied. Moments later a Twin Beech required the same. "120 knots," Center answered. We weren't the only one proud of our speed that day as almost instantly an F-18 smugly transmitted, "Ah, Center, Dusty 52 requests groundspeed readout." There was a slight pause. "525 knots on the ground, Dusty." Another silent pause. As I was thinking to myself how ripe a situation this was, I heard the familiar click of a radio transmission coming from my back-seater. It was at that precise moment I realized Walt and I had become a real crew, for we were both thinking in unison. "Center, Aspen 20, you got a ground speed readout for us?" There was a longer than normal pause. "Aspen, I show one thousand seven hundred and forty-two knots." No further inquiries were heard on that frequency.

And here's the longer, oral version: http://goedhartvoordieren.nl/?page=r/SR71/comments/2dpmw7/the_sr71_speed_check_story/

NROL-47 on fire before launch? Is that normal? by APX808 in spaceflight

[–]jardeon 19 points20 points  (0 children)

You're welcome!

I should have included this photo I shot of the WGS-8 launch -- you can see the big fireball wrapping around the base of the Delta IV as the engine starts up.

NROL-47 on fire before launch? Is that normal? by APX808 in spaceflight

[–]jardeon 103 points104 points  (0 children)

It's normal; the design of the Delta IV's engine allows for a small amount of hydrogen gas to escape during the countdown, which is then ignited by a combination of the sparklers at the base of the rocket, and the engines themselves.

The startup sequence on the Delta IV Heavy was modified to allow one engine to set off the fireball ahead of the other two igniting, to lessen some of this charring effect on the body of the rocket.

That style of hydrogen burnoff is part of the reason that the RS-68A isn't getting rated for human spaceflight, and why the Delta IV can't carry a crewed spacecraft.

Delta IV M+ (5,2), NROL-47 launch updates and discussion thread by ULA_Mods in ula

[–]jardeon 3 points4 points  (0 children)

The Delta IV Medium has flown without solids in the past. With the Lockheed/Boeing merger into ULA, there's not really a need for it to do so any longer; any payload that would fit that configuration can now fly cheaper on an Atlas V.

The addition of the SRBs is what converts a Delta IV Medium to a Delta IV Medium+

Please divert your course 15 degrees to the North to avoid a collision by Anakeen in CitiesSkylines

[–]jardeon 7 points8 points  (0 children)

The thing I love most about this story is seeing how much it's grown in the telling. Brain Shul's original version published in Sled Driver is a short anecdote, pretty straight forward and to the point. But the more times he's told this story (mostly in public speaking engagements) it's picked up a ton of extra detail and color.