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I currently work for the DNA lab that helped Russia identify them via mtDNA and nuclear DNA! We have this picture hanging in our hallway.

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Original Poster3 points · 5 hours ago

So cool!

Look at the comments. Dozens of people justifying it.

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Original Poster3 points · 16 hours ago

It is very scary to see how some people do not feel the least empathy.

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Original Poster67 points · 7 days ago

My book in collaboration with historian Dan Jones will be out in just a few weeks, so please consider pre-ordering it if you can. That's the best way to support my work. Thank you!

8 points · 7 days ago

Is it good? And is it going to be available in ebook and audio formats?

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Original Poster13 points · 7 days ago

It’s a fantastic book. :)

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I don't think he'd be wearing multiple layers of the same green. Bad/lazy colorization.

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Original Poster5 points · 12 days ago · edited 12 days ago

You are thinking wrong.

Edit: Call me lazy again....

I love recognizing your work anywhere, Marina! Great stuff, as always.

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Original Poster1 point · 13 days ago

Thanks!

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Those moving the wagon appear to be mostly German POWs

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Original Poster152 points · 14 days ago

They are indeed.

Original Poster169 points · 14 days ago

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The Battle of Vimy Ridge was part of the Battle of Arras, in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais region of France, during the First World War. The main combatants were the four divisions of the Canadian Corps in the First Army, against three divisions of the German 6th Army. The battle took place from 9 to 12 April 1917 at the beginning of the Battle of Arras, the first attack of the Nivelle Offensive, which was intended to attract German reserves from the French, before their attempt at a decisive offensive on the Aisne and the Chemin des Dames ridge further south.

The Canadian Corps was to capture the German-held high ground of Vimy Ridge, an escarpment on the northern flank of the Arras front. This would protect the First Army and the Third Army farther south from German enfilade fire. Supported by a creeping barrage, the Canadian Corps captured most of the ridge during the first day of the attack. The village of Thélus fell during the second day, as did the crest of the ridge, once the Canadian Corps overran a salient against considerable German resistance. The final objective, a fortified knoll located outside the village of Givenchy-en-Gohelle, fell to the Canadians on 12 April. The 6th Army then retreated to the Oppy–Méricourt line.

Historians attribute the success of the Canadian Corps to technical and tactical innovation, meticulous planning, powerful artillery support and extensive training, as well as the failure of the German 6th Army properly to apply the new German defensive doctrine. The battle was the first occasion when all four divisions of the Canadian Expeditionary Force fought together and it was made a symbol of Canadian national achievement and sacrifice. A 100-hectare (250-acre) portion of the former battleground serves as a memorial park and site of the Canadian National Vimy Memorial.

Courtesy of Wellcome Collection.

Original Poster38 points · 17 days ago · edited 17 days ago

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The quality of the original wasn't the best, but I hope you like it.

Nice. I might clean up the aging wear and tear, especially on the left side of the photo.

And I'm going to guess that the canvas cover over the convertible top which ended up blending in with Sophie's dress, was not in fact bright white at all but a beige or brown color which was normal on such cars. White canvas is something I've never seen used on cars. That would substantially improve the photo which is confusing as it is.

Also, how do you know the plumes on the two men were bright green like that? I've never seen that before. I'd guess black, but I'd never think this color unless you have evidence for that.

And why bright baby blue for FF's uniform jacket? Was that an A-H military color? You're not just picking random colors, are you?

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Original Poster2 points · 19 days ago

The colors are based on historical research. Look out for modern photographs of the uniform that is preserved at a museum in Vienna and you’ll see that my choices are accurate.

What kind of car where they driving when he was assassinated? I need to know because it's an extra credit question from a history class 17 years ago...

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Original Poster7 points · 19 days ago

a Gräf & Stift 28/32 PS open sports car. Photo.

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According to my Twitter followers, it could be 8th Indian Infantry

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8th_Infantry_Division_(India)

Awesome! And I learned a new Photoshop trick today (align layers), after years of using the software. This will save me so much time. Thank you!

Why is his sons head so massive and JFKs so tiny?

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Original Poster4 points · 1 month ago

Perspective.

Original Poster41 points · 1 month ago

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Trained as a lawyer, John F. Kennedy Jr. worked as a New York City Assistant District Attorney for almost four years. In 1995, he launched George magazine, using his political and celebrity status to publicize it. He died in a plane crash in 1999. His father was assassinated three days before his third birthday.


Please consider pre-ordering a copy of my forthcoming book, The Colour of Time - also available on Amazon US and other websites. Your support would be much appreciated! Thank you.

  • The book consists of 200 black and white photographs colorized by me, each accompanied by captions written by historian and bestselling author Dan Jones, covering a 100 years of world history.

Preordered! Only 24 and change pounds with shipping to the US

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Original Poster3 points · 1 month ago

Thank you very much.

No, Thank You!! Your work , that you offered for free here has intrigued our family countless times to read and discuss people and parts of history we never had before. It is wonderful:)

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Original Poster1 point · 1 month ago

I'm really happy to know that!

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That's exactly what I was looking for. Thank you!

The skin looks particularly well-done considering it's a first. Nice!

No way this picture is from 1850....

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Original Poster5 points · 1 month ago

It is.

Original Poster401 points · 1 month ago

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The Sami people (also known as the Sámi or the Saami) are a Finno-Ugric people inhabiting Sápmi, which today encompasses large parts of Norway and Sweden, northern parts of Finland, and the Murmansk Oblast of Russia. The Sami have historically been known in English as the Lapps or the Laplanders, but these terms can be perceived as derogatory. Sami ancestral lands are not well-defined. Their traditional languages are the Sami languages and are classified as a branch of the Uralic language family.

Traditionally, the Sami have pursued a variety of livelihoods, including coastal fishing, fur trapping, and sheep herding. Their best-known means of livelihood is semi-nomadic reindeer herding. Currently about 10% of the Sami are connected to reindeer herding, providing them with meat, fur, and transportation. 2,800 Sami people are actively involved in herding on a full-time basis. For traditional, environmental, cultural, and political reasons, reindeer herding is legally reserved for only Sami people in some regions of the Nordic countries.

When you color a photo do you have an idea of what the colors are based on the grey scale or do you just wing it?

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Original Poster2 points · 1 month ago

I always need to research the colors first.

how long does it take to colorize a photo like this?

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Original Poster78 points · 1 month ago

This one took me 3 hours.

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1 point · 1 month ago

What's Winston wearing? It's Full Dress clearly but of what? I know he was an honorary Colonel or Colonel-in-Chief around this time. He might have been a Knight of the Garter but I know this isn't that uniform. Is it a Lord Warden of the Cinque Port dress? I know that is a senior honorary role, but he was PM this time too. Maybe it's a obsolete dress for the First Lord of the Treasury

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Original Poster1 point · 1 month ago

He is in his Knight of the Garter robes.

Any British monarchy experts here can tell me why he’s in such extravagant robes? Is it his title/nobility?

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Original Poster11 points · 1 month ago

He is in his Knight of the Garter robes.

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Do you have an Instagram account? If so what is it so I can follow you.

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Original Poster1 point · 1 month ago

@marinaarts

Would be cool if you cloned out some of the white specs (no, not the baby) to clean it up a bit.

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Original Poster3 points · 1 month ago

I won’t restore the images this time. I want to preserve as much information as I can.

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Original Poster38 points · 1 month ago

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Arthur Schopenhauer (22 February 1788 – 21 September 1860) was a German philosopher. He is best known for his 1818 work The World as Will and Representation (expanded in 1844), wherein he characterizes the phenomenal world as the product of a blind and insatiable metaphysical will. Proceeding from the transcendental idealism of Immanuel Kant, Schopenhauer developed an atheistic metaphysical and ethical system that has been described as an exemplary manifestation of philosophical pessimism, rejecting the contemporaneous post-Kantian philosophies of German idealism. Schopenhauer was among the first thinkers in Western philosophy to share and affirm significant tenets of Eastern philosophy (e.g., asceticism, the world-as-appearance), having initially arrived at similar conclusions as the result of his own philosophical work.

Though his work failed to garner substantial attention during his life, Schopenhauer has had a posthumous impact across various disciplines, including philosophy, literature, and science. His writing on aesthetics, morality, and psychology would exert important influence on thinkers and artists throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. Those who have cited his influence include Friedrich Nietzsche, Richard Wagner, Leo Tolstoy, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Erwin Schrödinger, Karl Heinrich Ulrichs, Otto Rank, Gustav Mahler, Joseph Campbell, Albert Einstein, Carl Jung, Thomas Mann, Émile Zola, George Bernard Shaw, Jorge Luis Borges and Samuel Beckett.

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