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EDIT: Guys thanks so much! Two quick things 1- do check out National Geographic Explorers Festival this week #NatGeoFest. It is full of the most incredible folk you could ever dream of - imagine Nat Geo once a year bringing their explorers together- like the guy that found the Titanic is here! As are the next generation of badasses like Jess Cramp, the most incredible shark conservationist- check out her last expedition it was incredible @jessaddwater 2- Check out my last expedition (2 months ago) to the BREATHTAKING isolated island of Socotra - it took us 3 days on a cockroach infested cement cargo ship through pirate waters to get there and it was completely worth it. Flick back through my instagram feed but especially through my team mates Leon McCarron and Martin Edstrom's feeds and insta-stories. Those guys know how to take pics! We hope to go back there in a few months for a much bigger expedition... Thanks so much for your questions! I had a lot of fun answering them, but I’ve gotta run now, got explorers to play with!

I'm a National Geographic Explorer, an archaeologist (technically a palaeoanthropologist—think really REALLY old humans) who specializes in fossil hunting in caves in unstable/hostile places... and I'm also a stand-up comic. Catch me in a cave, a library, on TV, on stage and for a limited time only on REDDIT.

Questions about exploration, caves, Neanderthals, unstable places, how important exploration and science is in unstable places, neocolonialism, English weather, women in exploration and comedy are especially welcome. Also, any statements about how Hershey’s isn't chocolate will be especially welcome by this English girl.

I’ll also be speaking at the National Geographic Explorers Festival this week. Check out the schedule and where/when you can watch it live here: https://www.nationalgeographic.org/festival

Proof: https://twitter.com/NatGeo/status/1006931675585110018

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Original Poster75 points · 7 days ago

Guys thanks so much! Two quick things 1- do check out National Geographic Explorers Festival this week #NatGeoFest. It is full of the most incredible folk you could ever dream of - imagine Nat Geo once a year bringing their explorers together- like the guy that found the Titanic is here! As are the next generation of badasses like Jess Cramp, the most incredible shark conservationist- check out her last expedition it was incredible @jessaddwater 2- Check out my last expedition (2 months ago) to the BREATHTAKING isolated island of Socotra - it took us 3 days on a cockroach infested cement cargo ship through pirate waters to get there and it was completely worth it. Flick back through my instagram feed but especially through my team mates Leon McCarron and Martin Edstrom's feeds and insta-stories. Those guys know how to take pics! WE hope to go back there in a few months for a much bigger expedition... Thanks so much for your questions! I had a lot of fun answering them, but I’ve gotta run now, got explorers to play with!

is there such thing as poop fossils?

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Original Poster27 points · 7 days ago

Yes they are called coprolites! Also to the person that asked which Palaeolithic caves they should look up and might be of interest - you deleted your question and I couldn't find it again so here's my answer:

Oh there are so so many! I'm all about Neanderthals so I would suggest you look up the changing interpretations of the Shanidar material but also there are so, so many goodies!! I'm getting really excited just trying to think of which caves to direct you to- well I suppose the Gibraltar caves are interesting but lots are. Look at the sites run by Maria Soressi and some of the Italian Neanderthal sites too. Also Ewen Callaway at Nature often has great write ups on Neanderthals - check him out.

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There are actually 10 bludgeoned baby seals used in the making of every issue.

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Shhhhh.

But seriously, a lot of research was done to be sure this is the most environmentally friendly choice. We're in the midst of an internal audit at HQ to decrease our plastic use across the board.

Yeah, I really enjoyed them as a kid too! My folks couldnt afford them but I'd go over to my friends house to read them, lol - this is why I've always perceived them to be expensive but really, only 19/40 a year huh? I just might subscribe then, thanks.

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Bless your hearts. Reddit > any other platform

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u/nationalgeographic replied on the original thread with an explanation.

Hi all, appreciate your concern! The US, UK, and India editions have already switched to paper wrapping and global editions will follow suit. As we are a global company, it will take a few more months to finalize these plans in all the regions, including in Latin America.

Also

Here's a little more info! We're in the midst of an internal audit at HQ, trying to decrease our plastic-use across the board. Correct in assuming we don't have all that info handy, but the decision was in the works for quite a while and a lot of research was done to make sure that the switch actually was environmentally beneficial. https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2018/06/editor-letter-plastic-planet-waste-pollution-crisis/

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Thanks for sharing the explanation!

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Thank you so much for your questions and Happy Ocean Day! I had a lot of fun answering your questions but I've gotta run now- off to National Geographic Encounter to celebrate our Blue Planet! Hope to see you there - Sylvia

Hi, I’m Sylvia Earle, oceanographer, explorer, author, and lecturer. I’ve led more than 100 expeditions—including the first team of women aquanauts in 1970—and logged 7,000 hours underwater. My research concerns marine ecosystems with a focus on exploration, conservation, and the development of new technologies.

Learn more about my foundation, Mission Blue: https://mission-blue.org/about/

My work as a National Geographic Explorer in Residence: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/11/star-talk-sylvia-earle-neil-degrasse-tyson/

And today’s World Oceans Day event at Encounter in Times Square: https://www.natgeoencountertimessquare.com/

Proof: https://twitter.com/NatGeo/status/1005051368846045184

134

Do coral reef ecosystems have a chance of surviving? What research/initiatives are most exciting, that could potentially give us the knowledge/tools to help them survive?

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Original Poster30 points · 12 days ago

About half of the coral reefs are still in good shape and there is cause for hope that recovery of those that have been destroyed can recover if we have the will to do what it takes to reverse the outpouring of carbon dioxide, methane and other substances into the atmosphere that drive planetary warming. Healthy, intact coral reefs are more resilient than those that have been damaged by the extraction of grouper, snappers, parrotfish, lobsters and other wildlife that are as important to the existence of coral reefs as the corals themselves.

Fully protecting intact systems and giving them a break from fishing and other human-induced pressures, gives coral reefs, the ocean and ourselves insurance against the other impacts, whether natural or imposed by humans.

There is a promising trend toward establing "blue parks" in the sea that will help safeguard not only coral reefs but the ocean overall, and therefore benefit all of life on Earth, including humankind. The heart of the ocean, the High Seas, beyond national jurisdictional claims, occupy about half of the world. Imagine the benefits if people in nations around the world would agree to safeguard this vast, deep, wide and critically important part of the planet as a fully protected, fully respected global public trust -- the cornerstone of Earth's life support system.

Hello! You are inspiring! Have you ever witnessed something unexplainable? How did it make you feel?

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Original Poster21 points · 12 days ago

Every day I reflect on the miracle that life on Earth exists at all. And everyday I wonder about the perverse actions of humankind that are unravelling the natural systems that make our lives possible. I have no explanation for why, with our eyes wide open, we continue to clear cut forests, focus on fossil fuels for energy, pour toxic wastes into the world's rivers and ocean, consume ocean wildlife with little thought about their value other than as commodities,and otherwise think that no matter what we do to the natural world, humankind will prosper!

But as never before there is awareness that our prosperity is totally dependent on maintaining the integrity of the natural systems that sustain us -- air, ;and, water and the diverse fabric of life that has shaped a hospitable planet in a solar system and in an otherwise hostile universe. As never again, armed with this knowledge, we have the power to choose the future we want. This means exploring,learning, and caring for the ocean and the rest of nature as if our lives depend on it -- because they do.

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This is looking at plastic bag usage per individual though, right? It shouldn't matter if it's per capita.

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Original Poster13 points · 14 days ago

correct!

Original Poster18 points · 14 days ago

For more alarming infographics about plastic waste: https://on.natgeo.com/2JrIbsD

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