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relic2279 commented on a post in r/space
bobbyfiend 1 point

Non-technical question: does anyone know anything more about why Jeanette Epps has been grounded? There's some speculation on Twitter, which led me to wonder if having "CIA" on her resume might have been seen as an undesirable thing for an international space station. But that's a wild guess. Anyone have the inside scoop?

relic2279 1 point

I honestly think it may have been "personal matters" and has nothing to do with her previous CIA work.

There was an astronaut a few years back (Lisa Nowak) where she was arrested on attempted kidnapping charges and was clearly mentally unstable. They may have become more strict about personal life issues so something like that doesn't happen again. I think part of the job entails being a role model and if they deviate from that (getting busted in a bar parking lot snorting coke or something) they probably have zero tolerance for it.

Chachmaster3000 1 point

Is there one stand out solution to nuclear waste disposal that involves dumping said waste on a moon or planet, ejecting it in to space, or in to the sun? Or would the attempt to get it out in space be too dangerous to consider this as a possible option?

relic2279 1 point

Is there one stand out solution to nuclear waste disposal that involves dumping said waste on a moon or planet, ejecting it in to space, or in to the sun?

In addition to the safety issues, it's ridiculously cost prohibitive. I don't think people realize just how expensive it would be to send a few tons of spent fuel rods into the sun (using current technology).

relic2279 commented on a post in r/space
beefat99 1 point

How do the antennas on space probes work when some of them are near the edge of the solar system? Is there a point where they're large enough that distance won't affect them too badly?

relic2279 1 point

It's less about the antenna size at those distances, and more about how much power is required to send the commands. The more juice we use, the further we can broadcast effectively. Our broadcasts are made with pin-point precision so it's really all about the wattage of the signal to keep it from degrading (inverse square law).

thereisnocenter 1 point

Power isn't everything if you can make higher and higher directivity antennas. New Horizon's has only a 12W transmitter.

relic2279 1 point

On New Horizon's end, the transmitter doesn't have to be super strong since it talks to the deep space network. We can use our massive dishes and arrays to pick up the faintest of signals.

relic2279 commented on a post in r/space
18
relic2279 5 points

For a long time, we thought they were pretty boring planets compared to Jupiter and Saturn, so we couldn't really drum up support for funding for missions to the ice giants. And that's really what it boils down too; precedence of funding, where can we get the most bang for out buck.

Fortunately, we've found out that the ice giants aren't quite as boring as we once thought so missions may materialize.

relic2279 commented on a post in r/videos
77
msiekkinen 2 points

He's 37. I'm sure he went through BBS', prodidy/compuserve/aol, learning the handshake sound of modems then being amazed when getting his first cable modem and it blowing it out of the water from his rich friends ISDN connection.

relic2279 1 point

I'm 38 -- only true geeks and nerds (super early adopters) did the whole BBS thing. I was one of them. People logging onto our local BBSs were people that were into ham radios and so-forth. The internet didn't really expand into normal people's homes until 2000+

msiekkinen 1 point

Remember the dotcom bubble of the 90s? That's because people were using the internet en mass by then.

relic2279 1 point

Not at all. The internet was still 'new', that's when adoption began to exponentially increase, but it wasn't in full swing yet. That's what caused the bubble; people were beginning to use this new fangled thing, and everyone wanted to get in early. Money poured in but there wasn't enough traffic (cashflow) yet to sustain that kind of growth.

This graphic shows that the internet didn't really "grow" until after the dot-com boom which went bust: https://i.imgur.com/arbQPis.png

Also, in 1997, the total global internet traffic was 100 GB per hour. In 2002, 100 GB per second and by 2007, it was 2000 GB per second. Source The internet wasn't really adopted by the masses until after 2000.

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relic2279 commented on a post in r/TheoryOfReddit
relic2279 1 point

I've permanently banned less people in my 10 years on reddit (modding a few of its largest subreddits) than I have fingers. I don't do it because it doesn't work -- Perm-bans don't work for the reasons you state. And hunting down a persons new alt is nigh impossible so any rules which forbid creating a new account to evade a ban are wholly ineffective.

Temporary bans, however, do work somewhat. They work to moderate a person's behavior. Like a slap on the hand.

But sometimes a person is so determined to ruin a community that you need to take more effective measures. This is why I believe IP bans need to be instituted. I've been discussing & thinking about them for nearly a decade and have considered every drawback. Including inadvertently banning an IP for an entire dormitory, business, etc. Also, people can use VPNs to circumvent the bans, but I think the net benefit is still outweighs the drawbacks - it's better than having someone ruining my community. Especially a small community that's struggling. in extreme cases where your ban cuts of access to a country or something, that's when you can have the admins step in and do a meta-data ban or whatever they call it.

relic2279 commented on a post in r/videos
H720 2,566 points

This is really awesome, and as much as people will call HailCorporate on it being all about Amazon, we really need more of this.

I like how he didn't go up to them after expecting thanks. It was just "What can you use" and then sticking around to make sure they got it.

The coolest part was how nice the couriers were to the people too.

Hoping this comes to my city too, I'd love to do something like this for the people I see on the streets too often.

EDIT: WTF, why did the mods flair this as an Ad? He clearly says he's not affiliated with Amazon.

relic2279 [M] 1 point

EDIT: WTF, why did the mods flair this as an Ad? He clearly says he's not affiliated with Amazon.

Mod here. I wasn't the one who flagged it. However, with the way ads can be obfuscated nowadays, better safe than sorry. Intentional ad or not, it still sets out to promote a product. I personally don't care whether amazon paid for it, someone/company did it freelance, or Amazon has zero affiliation with the video, the end-result is the same.

Also, him saying he's not affiliated with Amazon almost makes me laugh. I've been doing this a long, long time. People looking to strike it rich on youtube will literally (not figuratively) say and do anything to get a hot viral video, using every dirty trick, spam technique or technicality that exists in the book. A lot of the shit I've seen people pull over the years is borderline unbelievable, some of it is truly ingenious, some go to such great lengths that there should be some sort of awards given out yearly for their efforts.

Ninja edit just to be more clear: Amazon could have hired a third party company to do the ad work, then that company could have subcontracted out the video work to this guy (could be a freelancer that does occasional work for the company). That would mean he's technically not affiliated with Amazon, despite Amazon paying for the ad. I'm not suggesting this is what's happening because I haven't bothered to look into it, but I am using it as an example to show just how convoluted these things can get -- in truth, that's pretty mild compared to some of the crap we see getting pulled from time to time.

relic2279 commented on a post in r/space
TreChomes 1 point

https://i.imgur.com/mpllRCf_d.jpg

can someone tell me the origin of this photo? its my phone wallpaper, i forget where i got it. i know its taken by an astronaut, and its a picture of earth. reverse image search gives me nada

relic2279 1 point

I'm having a hard time discerning what's what in that photo (my eyes aren't the best these days) Is that earth in the center there, with a little crescent or sliver of light? Because if so, that's not taken by an astronaut. The earth is too small in the photo. That photo would have to be taken at a distance way past the moon for the earth to appear that small.

TreChomes 1 point

good point, i might be wrong on my deets then

relic2279 3 points

Nope, I was wrong & you were correct, SpartanJack just linked to the original. It was taken by Command Module pilot Al Worden on his way back to Earth from the moon:

https://medium.com/learning-for-life/to-see-earth-and-moon-in-a-single-glance-89d094f6d40f

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relic2279 commented on a post in r/worldnews
Rain12913 10 points

Lol what? Not a chance. Criminal organizations don't want publicity with the exception of terrorists. The most powerful crime organization in the US actually deny that they exist. The higher their profile is, the easier it will be for laws to be passed against their interests.

relic2279 5 points

I think it depends on the organization. The Italian mafia used to make hits in public all the time specifically to show that you don't rat them out. You rat, or you betray them, you die. That was the statement they'd make and they needed to make that public.

makemeking706 3 points

People enjoy what they enjoy, so only you can say if it is worth it...but it's worth it.

Try the audiobooks, if you are not into reading them.

relic2279 1 point

WoT always gets flack for the middle; people say it drags out. But I think that's my favorite part of the series. He adds so much depth to his world it's unbelievable. I've yet to discover something remotely as fleshed out as Jordan's WoT world. I'm sure some may exist, but I've yet to stumble onto them.

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relic2279 commented on a post in r/space
humphreyzogart 5 points

If space is a vacuum, then no heat should be lost from the Sun to the Earth. But then why is Mercury hotter than Earth?

relic2279 6 points

There's still loss; distance causes a sort of signal degradation or diffusion. It's known as the inverse square law. Here's a picture showing it:

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Forces/imgfor/isqrr.gif

tom21g 7 points

when a distance is measured in “light years” I understand it’s the distance light travels in a year but what does “year” mean (how is a year measured) in astrophysics?

relic2279 1 point

1 light year = 5.88 trillion miles / 9.5 trillion km

It takes a photon (light) 1 year to travel 5.9 trillion miles or 9.5 trillion kilometers.

relic2279 commented on a post in r/todayilearned
lIlIlIlIlIlII 125 points

South Korea's birth rate is lower , but I don't see people posting it....

relic2279 1 point

Also, South Korea's suicide rate is significantly higher than Japan's.

relic2279 2 points

Japan still gives birth to over 1 million babies per year. So while their birthrate is low relative to a lot of other countries, don't mistake that for the country "dying off". People seem to make that mistake, and I saw someone asking when the Japanese would go extinct the other day.

relic2279 commented on a post in r/todayilearned
relic2279 0 points

Just a PSA: Please don't play on the escalators folks. I've witnessed so many accidents happen on them (around 1 every other week, sometimes more. 2 have resulted in deaths [granted, they were very old people so not in the best shape]). They're not made to be walked up or down contrary to Mitch Hedberg's comedy. They're extremely sharp on the edges, and extremely slippery, so falling is much easier, and cutting your head open on them is a very real possibility. The distance between steps isn't quite the same either, so it's easy to misjudge, especially when you're relying on muscle memory to run up them.

So yeah, believe it or not, they do not become stairs when they're broke. And don't trust them. They have sensors to keep the thing from running if you get caught but do you want to trust it? Trust the repair guy who has been to that location hundreds of times didn't just bypass it at some point? That exact situation happened to a Chinese woman who was literally 'eaten' slowly by the escalator. She had her kid in her arms and handed him off before sucumming to the hungry escalator. I'm sure you can find the video on liveleak or something if you're in a morbid mood.

TL;DR Do not play on escalators. You will get hurt. That I can promise you.

relic2279 commented on a post in r/todayilearned
Uhmerikan 7 points

I wonder how they phrase these questions?

Do they assume they're "fighting for their country" outside of their country? Are they being attacked at home? This would change things drastically for me.

relic2279 2 points

I just commented about that. It looks like they didn't give them any context whatsoever, and left it up to them to assume why they would be fighting. I think this entire survey is more of a study on blind nationalism than patriotism.

relic2279 1 point

As some comments pointed out, people’s willingness to fight can easily sway one way or the other depending on circumstances. Since the WIN Gallup question had no context, it was up to the respondents to assume who and why they would be fighting.

I actually like that. They didn't provide a context so the Japanese are like "Nope." If there's no reason, why should I fight? It shows how low blind nationalism is in Japan - something I'm envious of. I assume the number would be significantly higher if the context was "If aliens invaded ala Independence day style, would you fight for your country?" or "If North Korea tried to invade, would you stand up and fight them off?".

relic2279 commented on a post in r/space
relic2279 1 point

I run an i7 and I'm not having any issues, you sure it isn't some weird plug-in or add on?

svenskainflytta 1 point

Probably you have a different browser…

relic2279 1 point

Which browser are you using? I've tried both Firefox & Chrome, in fact, I have 3 tabs of /r/Space open in each as we speak. No unusual CPU load.

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relic2279 commented on a post in r/todayilearned
potxolo -1 points

Yes, but is that really relevant?

Yes, it's pretty relevant because it rendered you point moot. E-mail had been a known, established, and standardized technology since the 80s.

The general public wouldn't be able to use it,

There were plenty of ISPs by the early/mid 90s. AOL was a thing by then, and it provided e-mail services. My parents, who were not computer literate, were sending e-mails by 94, at least, from their home PC.

Yeah sending mail between BBS is a completely tangential point, since BBS were their own isolated ecosystems. But access to the internet, even if you did not had much idea of computers, really wasn't that big of a deal by the mid 90s, the whole dot com boom was gathering speed then.

relic2279 0 points

t's pretty relevant because it rendered you point moot. E-mail had been a known, established, and standardized technology since the 80s.

No offense man, but [the email you're thinking of] back then was very similar to what the internet was in the 70s. Did the internet technically exist? Sure, I guess. But was limited to just a few institutions that were directly connected. What you're saying is equivalent to telling me Google was around in the 1970s because the internet technically existed. This is the part you're having trouble with, and the part you cannot learn from a wikipedia page. Just because it was invented, doesn't mean it was in widespread use, or more importantly, connected everywhere it is today. That's my point.

As I said, email did exist, I never remotely said such a thing. What I do take issue with is these companies weren't all using the same standard, weren't all interconnected. In the beginning, if you were on prodigy, you couldn't send an email to compuserve, for example. At least not right away.

And Prodigy & Compuserv weren't what you're thinking of either, they were all mostly self-contained & isolated in 1992. They were basically nationalized BBSs. People logged into prodigy and got everything from that one company (games, news, etc), It wasn't until later that they opened it up to other networks, the world wide web, and even then it wasn't free to send a message; they charged per email on top of charging per hour.

Yeah sending mail between BBS is a completely tangential point, since BBS were their own isolated ecosystems.

No, not isolated. Less connected than the internet is now. Their inter-connectivity was larger, significantly than the email you're picturing in your head. Hell, many would just use other avenues instead of email; they'd use Usenet or the IRC. Also BBSs were ISPs back then. I mean, that's what they were, full stop.

potxolo 1 point

No, what I am trying to tell you is that sending an e-mail with a PC using dial up in the mid 90s was not as much of a technological feat as you're trying to make. Sure it was not as pervasive as today, but also not that exotic by then.

relic2279 0 points

I never said mid 90s, I said in 92. In the mid 90s, that's when things changed. Actually, things changed dramatically between 92 and 95.

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relic2279 commented on a post in r/space
wolverinefornasa 1 point

If there was a possibility of teleporting at this moment on the farthest planet the solar system and on that planet we would look with a telescope on our planet,Did I see Terra in the past?

relic2279 2 points

If you immediately teleported to Pluto, and looked back at earth, you'd be seeing what happened around 5 and a half hours ago. It would take just over 5 hours till you saw yourself teleport off Earth. That's how long light takes to reach Pluto so that's the "time lag" you're referring too.

xHomicide24x 1 point

When we look up at the night sky, are any of the points a light galaxies, or are they all just local star systems in the Milky Way?

relic2279 1 point

You can see a few galaxies with the naked eye, like Andromeda. But they're not like "points of light", like stars. See here for a more detailed answer:

https://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question15.html

relic2279 commented on a post in r/todayilearned
Bobsnoggles 105 points

Its actually because they have low wages and manufacturing is subsidized. There is about 10% of the overhead over there for a project start to finish. They could rip a product off, mass produce it, and be on to the next one for the time and money it takes to patent it in the US.

relic2279 1 point

They could rip a product off, mass produce it, and be on to the next one for the time and money it takes to patent it in the US.

Given that innovation builds the foundation for future innovations, that kinda puts China in a rough spot. Sure, that sort of approach allows them to keep pace, but it also means they will never, and can never be #1. They will always be playing catch-up. Then at some point, advances in automation and manufacturing will make cheap human labor moot or reduced significantly and China will be out of the game entirely.

I think people forget; China isn't the only cheap labor country. India's been on the come-up and starting to give China a run for its money.

Sandslinger_Eve -2 points

What is also forgotten is China started out as a third world agrarian society, and since the start of this century has gone from a country where higher education was for a tiny elite to producing twice the number of University Graduates as US does, with a heavy lean on engineering.

At this point anyone arguing that China is going to stay behind for very long is most likely trying to assuage their culture minority complex.

relic2279 1 point

Disclaimer: I'm just some white dude from Ohio, I don't really have any biases against any of the countries I talk about here.

At this point anyone arguing that China is going to stay behind for very long is most likely trying to assuage their culture minority complex.

Actually, I think you might have some sort of complex if you're resorting to an ad hominem in a discussion about technological innovation & future economic policies of foreign countries. I honestly have no idea how you get that I some sort of cultural minority complex from the content of my comment. Unless being critical of another country's economic and domestic policies are somehow taboo now? That's a ridiculous assertion.

culture minority complex.

On the contrary; I'm quite frustrated with the leadership of China because I feel like they're holding their population back from achieving some truly amazing things. I honestly believe there is a lot of untapped potential there. As it is today, I genuinely don't think it gets better for China until something big happens. As I said in my previous comment, I think India is going to become the new China and they have a better foundation to stand on. They're not crippled by an Authoritarian (bordering on Totalitarian) government system. They have their flaws, sure, like the caste system, but those are much easier to move beyond and change than a corrupt government that has been entrenched for decades. The government of India isn't restricting what their culture learns, and they aren't teaching them to hate, they're mostly democratic, etc. They have a lot of work ahead of them, but they're not handicapping themselves like China has decided to do.

Right now, China is almost exclusively an export driven economy. That is simply not sustainable. Everything from advances in robotics/automation, to other countries' tariffs & import laws can put your economy at risk. Hell, the risk can even come from home; if wages get raised (if China wants a robust middle class, which they do, they need to pay better wages), then the cost of manufacturing goes up, and China will no longer have a monopoly on exports since it will be more expensive to buy from China. We're actually already starting to see this. India is becoming a large exporter and a lot of manufacturing is moving back home, or staying the home country in the first place.

What is also forgotten is China started out as a third world agrarian society,

I honestly can't see how this has anything to do with the current leadership of China, and their plans for the future of China. My country started out as rebels & freedom fighters. Australia started out as land filled with banished convicts. I would never bring that up in a discussion about our economic and domestic policies because it has zero relevance today. I also don't want to look back, I want to look forward. The only time I want to look back at our past is only to learn from our mistakes so I don't make them as I look towards & step into the future.

relic2279 commented on a post in r/scifi
reverend_bones 38 points

The Wheel of Time series is complete.

I don't necessarily recommend it, but it's complete.

relic2279 18 points

I don't necessarily recommend it, but it's complete.

I highly recommend it and I'm not sure why reddit can be so down on this series. It's almost a meme at this point. Sure, the middle can drag out a bit, but if you enjoy that kind of writing, it adds a lot of depth to the world. I've still yet to encounter a series with as much depth and as rich (not suggesting one doesn't exist, just that I have yet to discover it).

It's one of my favorite series, if not thee favorite. And as another user commented; the audio books are amazing, done by a husband and wife duo (he reads the male parts, she the female).

relic2279 commented on a post in r/videos
smallbluetext 8 points

Pikachu speaks English (Asian woman voice) which is not normal and weird as fuck. OP was right I regret seeing the original source.

relic2279 5 points

Pikachu's Japanese Voice Actress is a middle-aged woman (and a mother I believe), and she's adorable as hell.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zbBIu7YL9E

MuggyFuzzball 3 points

This isn't the context they're asking about.

Apparently in a new movie, Pikachu speaks English with a male voice, which is the reason for OP's parody.

relic2279 0 points

Ahh, gotcha.

relic2279 commented on a post in r/todayilearned
Bokbreath -11 points

We aren’t talking about Norway. What have they got to do with this ?

relic2279 13 points

Japan and Norway both hunt whales. They're the only countries who hunt whales in any quantity. Give that you talked about the legality of slaughtering whales, Norway being the biggest offender, I think they have everything to do with this.

Bokbreath -11 points

We are talking about Japan. They are the subject of the post. Meat used to be illegal, I commented it’s a pity whaling isn’t as well. It’s a fairly straightforward point that has nothing to do with Norway.

relic2279 12 points

We are talking about Japan.

The article is about Japan, but you brought up whaling. And Norway is the biggest whaling country, it's prudent to point that out. Once you brought up whaling, the doors were opened to talk about Norway, since they're the largest whaling country. Japan doesn't actually hunt that many whales (relative to Norway), it's a misconception that they're the biggest/only whale hunting country. I think it was prudent to make that distinction because Norway's quota is more than 3x higher than Japan's whale quota.

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relic2279 commented on a post in r/TheoryOfReddit
relic2279 15 points

The old admins (Spez, Raldi, Keltranis, Kn0thing) leaned a bit on the libertarian side, but outright anti-corporate/anti-government? No, never got that from them. It was mostly expected too, given their age and location. White college educated 20-somethings in tech, living in san fran? They're basically a walking stereotype. I think a lot of people go through that libertarian-ish phase at that stage in their life.

viborg 3 points

I've here about 11 years now. The perspective from those who have been here longer, since the beginning, is that since the beginning the admins' main priority has been growing the site absolutely as quickly as possible. For them, it's always been about monetizing Reddit.

relic2279 0 points

I don't remember them focusing on monetization until reddit was spun off from Conde Nast. The drawback to that lack of focus was that reddit was literally run by a skeleton crew and given minimal funding to operate. But again, they weren't expected to make much either. Once they were spun off, and stock sold, the focus then became about how to pay for servers, more staff, etc. This is right when gold was introduced. They even had a little thermometer which showed the daily gold goals to pay for operation.

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relic2279

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I'm an old fart

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About relic2279

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