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weinerdog73 commented on a post in r/nba
[deleted] 5 points

I've gotten shit on because I'll sometimes post my age here so people can know that I saw so-and-so event live.

Come at my 16-year olds!

Edit: Sorry for the "my vs. me" mistake above, but I'm typing from my Blackberry.

weinerdog73 8 points

age checks out re: blackberry

weinerdog73 commented on a post in r/AcademicBiblical
weinerdog73 4 points

I very very strongly suggest Robert Alter's translations. His work on Job is found in his volume The Wisdom Books, and he goes into how biblical poetry works.. He also has a book called The Art of Biblical Poetry that's probably worth a read for you. I'm just finishing up his earlier one, The Art of Biblical Narrative, right now.

weinerdog73 commented on a post in r/Archaeology
[deleted] -2 points

[deleted]

weinerdog73 6 points

I would understand this if it said "Israel" but the Judean Hills are a geographical region and have nothing to do with politics. You get a downvote.

weinerdog73 commented on a post in r/AskHistorians
weinerdog73 21,668 points

We've learned such a huge amount of things, both large and small, that I'm sure I'm going to forget a number of them. But here goes:

1) On the most macro level, the earliest complete Hebrew manuscripts of the Bible that we have are in the Leningrad Codex of 1008 CE, which was copied closer to us than to the original creation of the Bible. Our closest complete copy in another language (Greek) is in the Codices Sinaiticus and Vaticanus, which are from the around the 4th-5th centuries CE. Questions started popping up regarding the reliability of the Bible––if all our Bibles are using a Hebrew translation that dates to a thousand years ago, and the text was originally written between ~2150-3000 years ago, how are we to know that we're even reading the right thing?

When the Scrolls were discovered and dated (using Paleography, C-14, and Mass Spectrometry) to between the 3rd century BCE and the 1st century CE (some are older, some newer), we were finally able to see if the text we had was relatively reliable. In most cases, on the macro scale, it is. There are a ton of minor textual variants (sentences, words, etc.), but you won't see the copies of Exodus saying that Pharaoh actually killed Moses and led the people out of Israel himself, if you catch my meaning. So on that level, we learned a lot about the transmission of the Bible.

2) We learned a ton about the variants of Second Temple Jews. While there's still scholarly debate on who exactly wrote the Scrolls (another question for another time), the general consensus is that it was the Essenes, of whom Josephus spoke. With the discovery of the Community Rule document, we got the smallest details of the way these people operated, including their initiation rites, their day to day rules, the way they used their money, and the way they interacted with each other.

3) The Scrolls have been a huge discovery in terms of the development of canon. For those who say the canon was closed since its original creation, the Scrolls have both supported some of their claims and muddied up the waters a bit. In terms of supporting the canon, we see that, as far back as the 3rd-2nd century BCE, the general outline of the Hebrew Bible was similar to today. They had the "writings of Moses" (Pentateuch), "The Prophets" (the major and minor prophets of our Bible), and the "Writings" (Wisdom literature and other assorted things like Job). We also have scrolls that contain both Genesis and Exodus, others with Exodus and Leviticus, Leviticus and Numbers, Numbers and Deuteronomy, so we know that they were thought of as a unit at that time. We also know that these books, along with the Psalms, were the most important to this group: there are about 40 copies of Psalms, 35 of Genesis, and similar amounts for the others, followed by a sizeable drop off when it comes to other books. For instance, there's only one of Ezra, none of Esther, and many others in the single digits.

How did it muddy up the canon? Among the most frequently found books are the Book of Jubilees and the Book of Enoch, indicating that these, too, were considered sacred, and more sacred than the majority of non-Pentateuchal books. Their writings frequently invoke ideas from the Book of Enoch and the book of Jubilees, and their calendar seemed to run by that of Jubilees.

4) We discovered a number of methods of biblical interpretation that are extremely interesting, and predate Midrash and Talmud. One method is the Pesher, in which verses from the Bible are laid out and the interpreter writes, one by one, how each verse applies to their modern situation (they were heavy into eschatology, believing there was going to be a massive war between the forces of good and evil). The other was in the form of pseudepigrapha–stories written from the point of view of a famous biblical character, that retell or expand on their story in order to smooth out some issues with the text. For a good example, I'd suggest the Genesis Apocryphon.

5) I don't know quite how to put this next one, except to say that they operated, literarily, in a very bizarre way. Part of the reason that they weren't particularly easy to date was that they never use proper names. They only use code names, and there are a number of characters that show up. Their initial leader, whom they see as something of a prophet, is only known as the Teacher of Righteousness. There's also the Man of the Lie, the Wicked Priest (his enemy), Those Who Speak Smooth Things, and a number of others that I can't recall offhand. The Teacher of Righteousness is thought to have written a number of the nonbiblical scrolls, most notably the Thanksgiving Hymns, which are a collection of really beautiful psalm-style poems. I really suggest reading them.

6) For Christians who are interested in the context that Jesus came out of, the Scrolls set the stage for a lot of things that appear in the New Testament. The New Jerusalem Text and Temple Scroll will remind you of Revelation, and a number of narrative devices ("fount of living water" for one) will look familiar. That's NOT to say that the Dead Sea sect were early Christians, or that Jesus was an Essene (though some people have argued weakly), but it simply shows some context. Personally, given the style and the narrative devices, I do think that Johannine christianity may have come out of a Jewish context that had some kind of influence from this group (for more on that, you can read a number of books and conference proceedings on Qumran and John), though that's as far as I'll go on that matter.

I'm missing a million things here. We learned so many little things from the Dead Sea Scrolls, along with the big things, that it literally takes whole books to explain. The best book, easiest to understand, that I've come across is The Meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls, by Flint and Vanderkam. That's where I got all of this information.

Hope this helps!

Edit: Minor textual changes, just like the Scrolls themselves.

Edit 2: Bonus fun fact: if you're looking for a very specific example of something that we didn't know that we know now, here's one. There's a moment in 1 Samuel 11, in which a character behaves very strangely. Nahash the Ammonite makes peace with the Israelites, and one verse later gouges out everyone's right eye for seemingly no reason. This has puzzled a lot of commentators. However, scroll 4QSam-a (4=Cave 4, Q=Qumran, Sam=Samuel, a=fragment A) has an additional verse that explains Nahash's behaviour (though he still comes off as a horrible tyrant): he liked gouging people's eyes out and the Israelites had escaped and conglomerated in the city that he oppresses in the following verse. Now, the NRSV translation, which is the one used by most academic scholars, includes that verse that was originally missing. So that's a very tangible example of things we learn from the Scrolls for you.

Edit 3: Thanks for the gold! Y'all know how to make a poor grad student feel special!

SapphireEyes 2 points

The bonus fun fact about Na'hash is in 1 Samuel *11!

weinerdog73 3 points

Corrected, thanks!

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weinerdog73 commented on a post in r/Archaeology
silverwarbler 14 points

Is there any place to read a translation of the scrolls found so far?

weinerdog73 10 points

Geza Vermes has a translation of all the non biblical scrolls that is excellent, though it uses a lot of King James English (thou, thy, etc). Here it is on Amazon:

The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English: Seventh Edition https://www.amazon.ca/dp/0141197315/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_Np8MybJRDB3XP

It's a nifty little edition

weinerdog73 commented on a post in r/politics
Melkor_The_Morgoth 9,198 points

His other new tweet is even better:

"I call my own shots, largely based on an accumulation of data, and everyone knows it. Some FAKE NEWS media, in order to marginalize, lies!"

You can tell the "President" Bannon stuff is getting to him

weinerdog73 1 point

you can't rhyme lize with lies, it's shitty poetry

weinerdog73 3 points

Hi Reddit, I don't know if this is the right sub for this (and I hope you'll point me in the right direction if it isn't), but we're making a film by the name of Woodland Grey. The script is ready, and we've filmed a spec trailer because we're going about funding it in an unusual way, by drumming up buzz with facebook "likes" on our page, rather than asking people for money. For a full explanation of the funding concept, you can watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieyTHkFJj7I&feature=youtu.be

Like I said, we don't want your money. If you do want to support us, it would be awesome if you would like our facebook page, which you'll find here: https://www.facebook.com/woodlandgrey/

Thanks for taking the time to watch and read!

The Woodland Grey team

weinerdog73 2 points

Hi Reddit, I don't know if this is the right sub for this (and I hope you'll point me in the right direction if it isn't), but we're making a film by the name of Woodland Grey. The script is ready, and we've filmed a spec trailer because we're going about funding it in an unusual way, by drumming up buzz with facebook "likes" on our page, rather than asking people for money. For a full explanation of the funding concept, you can watch this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieyTHkFJj7I&feature=youtu.be

Like I said, we don't want your money. If you do want to support us, it would be awesome if you would like our facebook page, which you'll find here: https://www.facebook.com/woodlandgrey/

Thanks for taking the time to watch and read!

The Woodland Grey team

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